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SoulMonster

1991.12.09 - Madison Square Garden, New York, USA

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1991.12.09 - Madison Square Garden, New York, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Tue Aug 21, 2012 2:49 am

Date:
December 9, 1991.

Venue:
Madison Square Garden.

Location:
New York, NY, USA.

Setlist:
01. Nightrain
02. Mr. Brownstone
03. Live And Let Die
04. Attitude
05. Bad Obsession
06. Double Talkin' Jive
07. Civil War
08. Patience
09. You Could Be Mine
10. So Fine
11. It's So Easy
12. Don't Cry [w/ Shannon Hoon]
Godfather Theme
13. Sweet Child O' Mine
14. Move To The City
15. Rocket Queen [w/ It Tastes Good, Don't It?]
16. November Rain
17. Welcome To The Jungle
18. Knockin' On Heaven's Door
19. Estranged
20. Paradise City

Line-up:
Axl Rose (vocals), Gilby Clarke (rhythm guitarist), Slash (lead guitarist), Duff McKagan (bass), Dizzy Reed (keyboards) and Matt Sorum (drums).

Next concert: 1991.12.10.
Previous concert: 1991.12.06.
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Re: 1991.12.09 - Madison Square Garden, New York, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Tue May 06, 2014 1:23 am

Review of one of the MSG shows in late 1991, from New Strait Times, January 7, 1992:

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Re: 1991.12.09 - Madison Square Garden, New York, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Tue May 13, 2014 7:22 am

Review in New York Times, December 11, 1991:

Review/Rock; Guns 'n' Roses Brings New Lineup to the Garden
By JON PARELES
Published: December 11, 1991

Guns 'n' Roses has staked its reputation on its volatility. W. Axl Rose, its lead singer, is famous for his temper, his onstage tirades and his conviction that self-indulgence plus self-importance equals integrity. The band's songs, which veer from raging hard-rock to wistful ballads, are a secondary draw. Yet when Guns 'n' Roses came to Madison Square Garden on Monday night for the first of three sold-out shows -- the final show is Friday night -- the most surprising part of its set was how routine it seemed.

The band has a new lineup for this part of its tour. Izzy Stradlin, the rhythm guitarist who co-wrote many of the songs on "Use Your Illusion" I and II (Geffen), the band's current best-selling albums, has quit, replaced for the tour by Gilbey Clarke. The band has also added two backup singers and three horn players, all women dressed in black lingerie. It's a horn section valued primarily for its G-strings. The women pouted and posed like Motley Crue's backup singers; also like Motley Crue, Guns 'n' Roses had an electronic display to flash its name between the set and encores, like an "Applause" sign.

As usual, the band went on late, nearly 90 minutes after the opening act, Soundgarden, had finished. As usual, the audience amused itself mightily between sets, aided by lighting and video crews who spotlighted girls who took off their shirts. As usual, the band worked hard once it appeared, playing for nearly 2 hours 45 minutes, with Mr. Rose and the other band members running and leaping around the stage as they knocked out one riff-and-screech song after another. (Near the end of the show, Mr. Rose announced that overtime would cost the band $24,000.)

And as usual, Mr. Rose stopped the show for his obligatory rant against the press. He excoriated Circus magazine, threatened lawsuits and asserted that someone had been hired to shoot him as revenge for nasty things he said in "Get in the Ring," the anti-press diatribe on "Use Your Illusion II." "I'm not really worried about what opening my mouth will do to my record sales," he announced, knowing he'd draw cheers. Lest anyone misunderstand his role in current rock, during "Civil War" he was dressed in a jacket with the word "rebel" above a Confederate flag.

Guns 'n' Roses' song choices vary from show to show, and Monday's set had a wildly uneven pace. Rockers like "Double Talkin' Jive," "Mr. Brownstone" or "You Could Be Mine" chomped down hard on the music, creating the perfect tension between muscular riffs and Mr. Rose's snarling or howling voice. Some ballads, like "Don't Cry," had terse, telling lead-guitar solos by Slash; others, like "Sweet Child o' Mine" or "November Rain," sounded mechanical as they shifted from a slow main section to a fast finale. It's hard to maintain momentum in such a long set, but at times Guns 'n' Roses seemed to be deliberately dragging the songs out, or just noodling through unaccompanied drum and guitar solos.

Hard-rock bands that sell millions of albums can usually count on their fans to shout and sing along, but Monday's audience was oddly restrained. Beyond the front rows, many people simply stood and watched as Mr. Rose raced around the stage, shimmying his shoulders or twirling his microphone stand and changing his costume every song or two; although the band played its ballad "Patience" quietly, as if expecting a sing-along, the audience didn't oblige. Only when Guns 'n' Roses played its MTV-promoted singles, or the house lights went on, did concertgoers make a show of enthusiasm. Partway through the set, Slash jokingly called the band "the No. 1 rock-and-roll cabaret act," but that's how its fans treated it.
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Re: 1991.12.09 - Madison Square Garden, New York, USA

Post by Blackstar on Sun Apr 22, 2018 8:18 am

Review from Rolling Stone:

David Fricke wrote:For once, Axl Rose had a good excuse for coming on an hour and a half late: He was sick, bitten by a demon flu that left him throwing up backstage between songs. Rose's illness accounted for both his extended absences from the stage and the rocky pacing of the show. Slash - looking, in his top hat and Cousin It curls, like the cover of T. Rex's Sliver come to life - covered for Rose with overlong guitar solos, and bassist Duff McKagan stepped in with a couple of lead vocals of his own. Rose also kept his stage oratory to a minimum, indulging in a brief anti-rock press rant "so the parasites looking for a meal ticket have something to write about" and making only a passing reference to departed guitarist Izzy Stradlin when he introduced new boy Gilby Clarke ("We got somebody who felt a little more like touring and hanging out with us").

But in spite of Rose's handicap, the Gunners didn't cheat on show time - nearly three hours - or shake appeal. When they were good, they rose to the heights of feral hysteria from Appetite For Destruction and the best parts of the Use Your Illusion twins. Once they hit the boards (to a tape of Leonard Cohen singing "Everybody Knows" - "Everybody knows that the dice are loaded … Everybody knows the good guys lost"), they ripped straight into "Nightrain" and "Mr. Brownstone," Rose racing all over the multitiered stage and hurling his mike stand javelin-style into the air, usually in a dangerous proximity to another Gunner. "Civil War," arguably the band's finest seven minutes on record, was a fierce, intensely focused serving of slow-burn agit-slam, sandwiched by Slash's burbling wah-wah quotations from Jimi Hendrix's "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)."

Even when they stumbled, the band members showed flashes of inspiration. "Don't Cry" was unwisely shoehorned between a storming "It's So Easy" and a long, unremarkable drum solo by Matt Sorum, but this rendition packed a greater anthemlike wallop than in the two Illusion versions. A formulaic reading of "Sweet Child O' Mine" was prefaced by Rose's soulful a cappella crooning of Grand Funk Railroad's "Bad Time" just as Slash hit the piercing signature riff of "Sweet Child."

The main downer of Guns N' Roses extramusical reputation and Axl Rose's loose-cannon antics is that they obscure the band's real rock & roll worth. Tonight, they ran the gamut from the sublime (a ravishing twin-guitar snippet of the Rolling Stones' "Wild Horses" by Slash and Clarke) to the seething (a ferocious "Double Talkin' Jive") to the silly (a female brass section and backup singers decked out in heavy-metal harlot lingerie). As for their aversion to punctuality, it's become a kind of ritualized anarchy, which is a contradiction in terms. Besides, the best rock & roll - and rock & roll spirit - is about not wasting time: it's about seizing the moment and jump-starting the vibe, not just waiting for it to hit. If Guns N' Roses really want to be unpredictable, they should try a surprise attack: Get the opening band offstage pronto, plug in straightaway and whip into "Nightrain" or, better yet, "Don't Damn Me" (alas, not in tonight's set) before the fans know what hit 'em.

Time and the next album (whenever that comes) will tell how they recover from the loss of Stradlin, who was a formidable rhythm guitarist and a key songwriter. But the primal GN'R snarl of "You Could Be Mine" - delivered tonight with vehement enthusiasm - was vivid proof that there is still a lot more here than makes the headlines. "That was gun," Rose announced with a smile afterward. Amen to that.
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Re: 1991.12.09 - Madison Square Garden, New York, USA

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