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SoulMonster

1989.10.18 - Los Angeles Coliseum, Los Angeles, USA

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1989.10.18 - Los Angeles Coliseum, Los Angeles, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Thu Dec 08, 2011 1:02 am

Date:
October 18, 1989.

Venue:
Los Angeles Coliseum.

Location:
Los Angeles, USA.

Setlist:
01. It's So Easy
02. Mr. Brownstone
03. Out Ta Get Me
04. Move to the City
05. Patience
06. My Michelle
07. Rocket Queen
08. Sweet Child O'Mine
09. Welcome to the Jungle
10. Knockin' On Heaven's Door
11. Paradise City

Line-up:
Axl Rose (vocals), Izzy Stradlin (rhythm guitarist), Slash (lead guitarist), Duff McKagan (bass) and Steven Adler (drums).

Notes:
Opening for Rolling Stones.

Quotes:
I was watching my band mentally and physically fall apart. It was a harsh move [talking about it] onstage, but we had tried everything else, and nobody would stop. It just kept getting worse and worse and worse. [...] I remember bumping into [Geffen Records head] David Geffen when I walked onstage and he was all excited about us playing with the Stones and all the people there. I just looked at him and said, 'Well, then enjoy (the show) because it's the last (damn) one.' [Run N' Gun, Los Angeles Times, July 1991]
[...]I got the call that Axl wasn't going to do the gigs. His reasoning was that Steven and I were on smack. We were...but that's beside the point; we were opening for The Stones. Somehow we coerced him into doing the first show and it was a disaster. "Enjoy the show," Axl said when we took the stage, "because it's going to be our last one. There are too many of us dancing with Mr. Brownstone." I was so pissed off about that and he was so pissed at me for being a junkie that I spent the better half of the show facing my amps. Nothing was together that night, the band sounded horrible [Slash's autobiograohy, p 277-278]
As showtime approached, Axl wasn't there and everyone - us, the Stones' people - was sweating and frantic. But he made it at the last minute, the first concert went off without a hitch, and I didn't slip on the metal stage [wearing his usual boots]. Sure, the guys were smacked out of their minds, but I had family and good friends around me, and I didn't really pay much attention to what was going on with those guys backstage [Duff's autobiography, "It's So Easy", 2011, p. 157][
As I neared the stage I could hear the fas. As I rounded the corner, I could see the multitudes screaming their heads off. The sound of that crowd was so powerful that it actually gave me an incredible buzz. When the audience caught sight of us, they all bolted upright. It was like one giant wave of energy, intensely stimulating. We were the proud prodigy, the bastard sons of the Rolling Stones, and we killed that night. We were there to show the world that rock was alive and bigger than ever, and we succeeded in every way.

But at a time when we should have been rejoicing beyond all measure, Axl instead chose to wag his finger. He had become aware of the out-of-control partying that was happening within the band and he made a long rambling statement during the show. "I some people in this organization don't get their shit together and stop dancing with Mr. Brownstone, this is going to be the last Guns N' Roses show. Ever!"

Axl went on and on, threatening to shut us down if the runaway abuse continued. Maybe it was done for publicity, maybe out of genuine concern, I don't know, but it was way over the top. Disbanding GNR for drug abuse was like grounding a bird for flying
[Steven's autobiography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, p. 199-200]
Then came the second night [This really happened on the first night, on October 18, Duff seems to be mistaken here]. Before we played our first note, Axl suddenly announced to the 80,000 people in attendance that "if certain people in Guns N' Roses didn't stop dancing with Mr. Brownstone," this would be our last show. The crowd became absolutely quiet. People in the audience looked at one another; they seemed confused as we were. They really had no idea what Axl was talking about. I shrank. I felt so fucking embarrassed. And I was so fucking mad that Axl felt he could do this to me. I would have been supportive if he was sufficiently pissed off at certain guys to want to confront them for what was going on - I was with him., the situation was bad. But he needed to talk about that shit in private! Not out here. Never out here. Once Axl took his concerns public, the times of being a gang - us against the world - were over. We played the rest of the show, but it was a halfhearted effort at best. Afterward, and really for the remainder of our career, we just went our separate ways. That night officially rang the bell for the end of an era of GN'R [Duff's autobiography, "It's So Easy", 2011, p. 158]
Next concert: 1989.10.19.
Previous concert: 1989.10.13.


Last edited by Soulmonster on Wed May 07, 2014 5:23 am; edited 4 times in total
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Re: 1989.10.18 - Los Angeles Coliseum, Los Angeles, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Thu Jan 19, 2012 8:35 am

Interesting how much weight Duff puts on Axl's Mr. Brownstone rant when it comes to the gradual dissolution of GN'R. I wasn't aware how much it affected the band long-term, or at least affected Duff.
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Re: 1989.10.18 - Los Angeles Coliseum, Los Angeles, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Wed May 07, 2014 4:50 am

Preview to the four Coliseum dates with Rolling Stones in Los Angeles Times, October 15, 1989:

SHOWDOWN AT THE COLISEUM : Guns N' Roses Take on the Rolling Stones : For years, there was only one choice as 'The World's Greatest Rock 'n' Roll Band'--but it's all over now
October 15, 1989|ROBERT HILBURN

Lots of people think the world's greatest rock band will be on stage this week when the Rolling Stones and Guns N' Roses appear at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, but don't assume they're all referring to the Stones.

The Stones have been called the world's greatest band for so long now that no one even considered the possibility on past tours of another group actually upstaging the masters.

But the Stones' seven-year absence from touring has made the once-invincible band seem vulnerable, and rock observers and fans have began wondering if it isn't time to nominate another group as the world's greatest.

Guns N' Roses is just one of several contenders, but it is the only one of the potential rivals that will be on the same bill with the Stones during the tour.

There is such a sense of drama surrounding the Stones/Roses match-up that you can imagine a ring announcer stepping up to the microphone and introducing the contestants at the Coliseum, the only place on the Stones' 3 1/2-month tour where Roses will be appearing.

"In this corner," he might say, "from Los Angeles, California . . . a band that was formed just four years ago, but which has already sold more than 12 million records, including such mega-hits as 'Sweet Child o' Mine,' 'Welcome to the Jungle' and 'Patience' . . .

"A group whose lead singer Axl Rose conveys the charisma and mystery of such rock immortals as Jim Morrison . . . a band whose image and music live up to the sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll attitude so fully that it has been called the bastard offspring of the Rolling Stones themselves.

"L.A.'s own . . . GUNS N' ROSES."

When the cheering wanes, the announcer continues:

"And now the defending champions . . . from London, England, a band that has helped shape rock 'n' roll for more than 25 years . . . a band with more than three dozen Top 40 singles, including such masterworks as 'Satisfaction,' 'Honky Tonk Women' and 'Tumbling Dice' . . .

"A band whose lead singer, Mick Jagger, was outraging parents before Jim Morrison was even cutting classes at UCLA . . . a band that returned to live shows this summer after a seven-year layoff and is still able to pack stadiums around the country.

"Ladies and gentlemen . . . THE ROLLING STONES."

Start your amps.

"I don't see the Coliseum concerts as a contest at all," a 17-year-old rock fan said shortly after the Stones/Roses package was announced in August.

A 20-year-old fan who overheard the remarks in a West Hollywood record store, also balked at the idea of the concert's being a true battle of the bands.

"Showdown? It's going to be a wipe-out," he said condescendingly.

The noteworthy thing is that the two Southern California fans were supporting different groups.

Gerald Macy, 17, said he thinks the Stones' reputation and great backlog of material make it impossible for Guns N' Roses to upstage them. "Everybody my age has been listening to the Stones and waiting to see them all our lives. I like Guns N' Roses, but there would be no Guns N' Roses without the Stones."

But Bill Hardin, 20, said he thinks time is against the Stones. "I'm interested in seeing them, but they don't mean anything to me," he said.

"Guns N' Roses are like the Stones were 20 years ago, and who wouldn't rather have seen the Stones then than now? It's like Muhammad Ali getting into the ring with Mike Tyson or something. You respect the Stones, but Guns N' Roses are today ."

There's no way--short of an exit poll--to know precisely what role Guns N' Roses played in convincing more than 275,000 fans to pay from $35 (the Ticketmaster charge) to $500 (the broker charge for choice seats) to see Wednesday's Coliseum match-up, which will be repeated Thursday, Saturday and next Sunday. Industry observers, however, believe the L.A.-based quintet may have been responsible for as much as 20 to 40% of the sales.

"The Who's failure to sell out even a single show in August at the Coliseum demonstrated the value of having some insurance, which a hot new band like Guns N' Roses provides," said a concert producer who is not involved with the local Stones dates and asked that his name not be used.

"I believe the Stones are much a stronger draw in Southern California than the Who and that they would have been able to sell out at least two Coliseum shows, maybe even a third on their own, but Guns N' Roses guaranteed a third date and enabled the promoters to add a fourth."

Joseph Rascoff, business manager for the Stones and producer of the tour, said the sluggish Who sales in Los Angeles and San Diego didn't worry him.

"The Rolling Stones had planned from the begining to have a current album out and (work toward) being meaningful in the 1989 music environment," he said. "This gave their tour a whole different dimension and momentum than the Who tour, which had a lot of nostalgic overtones."
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Re: 1989.10.18 - Los Angeles Coliseum, Los Angeles, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Wed May 07, 2014 5:24 am

I believe this is the first show where I have quotes from the entire lineup.
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Re: 1989.10.18 - Los Angeles Coliseum, Los Angeles, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Sun Nov 23, 2014 8:13 pm

And now also from Alan Niven:

The day of the first show , Brian Ahern [the Stones’ production manager] comes to me and he goes: “Your guy’s [Axl] not here. Tell me what I’m supposed to do.” I said: “Do you have a contact in the LAPD who is an absolutely no-questions-asked guy?” And he said: “I do.” So the guy came in and I told him: “I’m going to give you an address.” And it was Axl’s apartment. I said: “I want you to immediately send two no-questions-asked uniforms to this address, get the occupants out of that condominium in any which way they can, and bring them right here – in handcuffs if necessary.”

"They went and got him, and the band arrived on stage a mere twenty minutes late. I’m standing in the backstage feeling pretty damn clever. And that’s right at the moment that Axl announces this is going to be the last show and he’s going to retire.
Source: http://metalhammer.teamrock.com/features/2014-05-30/the-night-axl-had-to-be-arrested-to-get-him-to-the-gig-on-time
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