APPETITE FOR DISCUSSION
Welcome to Appetite for Discussion -- a Guns N' Roses fan forum!

Please feel free to look around the forum as a guest, I hope you will find something of interest. If you want to join the discussions or contribute in other ways then you need to become a member. We especially welcome anyone who wants to share documents for our archive or would be interested in translating or transcribing articles and interviews.

Registering is free and easy.

Cheers!
SoulMonster
APPETITE FOR DISCUSSION
Welcome to Appetite for Discussion -- a Guns N' Roses fan forum!

Please feel free to look around the forum as a guest, I hope you will find something of interest. If you want to join the discussions or contribute in other ways then you need to become a member. We especially welcome anyone who wants to share documents for our archive or would be interested in translating or transcribing articles and interviews.

Registering is free and easy.

Cheers!
SoulMonster

2011.10.18 - Citypages - Duff McKagan Talks Drugs, Books, And The Minnesota Music Scene

Go down

2011.10.18 - Citypages - Duff McKagan Talks Drugs, Books, And The Minnesota Music Scene Empty 2011.10.18 - Citypages - Duff McKagan Talks Drugs, Books, And The Minnesota Music Scene

Post by Blackstar Sat Dec 18, 2021 6:45 pm

Duff McKagan, former Guns N' Roses bassist, talks drugs, books, and the Minnesota music scene

By Nicole Crosbie

Duff McKagan, former bassist for Guns N' Roses, knows that his rock 'n' roll lifestyle almost killed him. At the pinnacle of band's success McKagan's drug and alcohol problem began to spiral out of control. In 1994, his pancreas burst as a result of substance abuse. Doctors told him that if he didn't get clean, he would die.

"Nobody dreams of being in a band, writing great songs, and being addicted," he says. "You never hear of anyone say, 'Yeah, I want to be in a band and I want to be strung out.' But there I was."

McKagan's book, It's so Easy (and other lies), chronicles that journey, from a difficult childhood, to the formation of Guns N' Roses, to his struggle with drugs and alcohol, to his decision to get clean. Today, McKagan is sober, happily married to supermodel Susan Holmes McKagan, and is the proud father of two girls, Grace (14) and Mae (11). He also went back to school to study business at Seattle University, and currently writes for Seattle Weekly and Playboy.

McKagan's book tour took him to Mall of America this weekend, where he hosted a Q&A with fans, signed autographs, and talked with City Pages.

How did you decide to write a book?

Having two columns [as a writer for Playboy and Seattle Weekly] and two deadlines, I discovered that I can articulate myself better in written word. It was kind of an 'a-ha!' revelation for me. My writing lead to self-discoveries, and I started writing these side stories about me that were not appropriate in column form. People would ask, 'How much did you drink? How much drugs did you do?' I started to write how I got there; the descent into insanity basically. I wrote about how I got out: through martial arts, meeting my wife, and having my first child.

I saw where I took responsibility for my own life. All that bad shit that happened? Maybe it wasn't everyone else's fault. Maybe I had something to do with it. And all that good stuff? I probably didn't have everything to do with all the good stuff. It was really really interesting, sad, exhilarating to write about this stuff.

Do you have a favorite artist that you have played with?

Iggy [Pop] is number one. I got to play on Iggy's record. For a guy like me, that's it.

I also got to play with Brian James, I got to be in a band with Steve Jones from the [Sex] Pistols. There are so many people... I can't even name everyone. Wayne Kramer from MC5. Brian May and Dave Grohl. Lots of Seattle people. Elton John's guys and Pearl Jam's guys. I've been really pretty lucky.

What are your thoughts on Guns N' Roses and that time in your life?

We did it our own way, and kind of against all odds. We didn't care what other people were doing. We just put our ear muffs on, pinned our ears back, and went for it. At some point, a bunch of other people saw it our way. It was really an amazing and beautiful ride.

Do you have any regrets?

I wouldn't be talking to you right now about my book if it weren't for the things I did while I was young. I wouldn't change my life and my past for anything, because I wouldn't have met my wife. I wouldn't have been at that place to get her phone number, and therefore be with my kids. So my past is my past and I'm trying now to learn from different things, instead of just being like, 'Oh fuck it.' Maybe there's a lesson.

Do you have any thoughts on the Minneapolis music scene?

Prince is my all-time guy. I think I make that pretty clear in the book. Hüsker Dü and the Replacements -- the whole SST scene -- was a big deal when I was a kid. Black Flag saw Hüsker Dü, signed them to their SST label, and suddenly Hüsker Dü was in the van and spreading their gospel. With the Replacements, they're kind of like a punk rock, Rolling Stones type of thing. Really cool, different music has come out of Minneapolis.

Any thoughts on Tommy Stinson (founding member of the Replacements and current bass player for Guns N' Roses)?

He's my replacement -- that's our ongoing joke. We're good buddies. I was in the band that opened for The Replacements in 1983, so I've known Tommy since then. He's a fine gentlemen. We have a lot of things in common besides rock music. I think he's a fine fellow and a righteous dude. I like him.

Where are you at with your current band, Loaded?

They [Guns N' Roses and Velvet Revolver] both play really honest music. We never tried to write a commercial hit. Loaded is the same in that respect; the lyrics and everything about the music are just the truth. In some ways Loaded is a very modern band and in some ways we're different and punk rock.

How is fatherhood working out for you?

I can't articulate how many ways that it has changed me; just being there and really watching the things you say and following through because you have the responsibility of the development of two girls. It keeps you really current and really sort of young. I get a lot of good jokes from the whole thing, and a lot of times the joke's on me. It's fucking wonderful.

What is the most important life lesson you've learned so far?

Not to take life so goddamn seriously, and to step outside of yourself for a minute because it's not all about you. Take responsibility for your shit, and stay true to your goddamn truth no matter what. I'm not perfect -- I know that -- though maybe at one point in my life I thought, 'Yeah, I'm fucking perfect, man. I'm right all the time.' That's just not the truth. That's not how life works. I've learned some of those things along the way, which is good.

https://web.archive.org/web/20111018210215/http://blogs.citypages.com/dressingroom/2011/10/duff_mckagan_guns_n_roses_drugs_books_minnesota.php
Blackstar
Blackstar
ADMIN

Posts : 7397
Plectra : 50801
Reputation : 93
Join date : 2018-03-17

Back to top Go down

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum