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APPETITE FOR DISCUSSION
Welcome to Appetite for Discussion -- a Guns N' Roses fan forum!

Please feel free to look around the forum as a guest, I hope you will find something of interest. If you want to join the discussions or contribute in other ways then you need to become a member. We especially welcome anyone who wants to share documents for our archive or would be interested in translating or transcribing articles and interviews.

Registering is free and easy.

Cheers!
SoulMonster

2018.10.15 - Appetite for Distortion - Interview with Teddy Andreadis & Roberta Freeman

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2018.10.15 - Appetite for Distortion - Interview with Teddy Andreadis & Roberta Freeman Empty 2018.10.15 - Appetite for Distortion - Interview with Teddy Andreadis & Roberta Freeman

Post by Blackstar Tue Oct 16, 2018 1:29 am



Transcript of selected parts:

Brando: How long did you guys go back? I mean, did it start with Guns N' Roses or did you kind of know each other before?

Teddy Andreadis: Roberta came from Cinderella, I believe, right?

Roberta Freeman: Yeah, I was on the road with Cinderella and Fred [Coury] was friends with Slash and that's how it all began. And then we became really good friends on the road and we remained in touch with each other.

Brando: I love that, it's kind of like when you watch a sitcom and you find out that, you know, Courtney Cox and Jennifer Aniston are really friends, you know, it's like you enjoy that the band that you love that you're actually friends outside which has been a unique thing to balance with the world of Guns N' Roses. But that's just was a minor part of Roberta's story and her minor part of Teddy's story. So to go back, I know Roberta comes from growing up with, you know, around my tribe, the Jews, in New York. But Teddy, I was just telling Roberta that my best friend is Mike [?] and it took so long to pronounce his last name-

TA: Well, that's exactly why I became Teddy Zigzag Big Bag Andreadis.

[laughs]

TA: Nobody could pronounce my last name.

[...]

RF: How did Axl say your name?

TA: [laughs] Well, he actually just said anything Tom Mayhue told him to say. He would sa, "That's Teddy Angry Anus," that's what Tom called me and Axl heard that. he is and that's what people-

RF: I don't remember him saying that. Oh my god.

Brando: Did you have like some sort of like a hemorrhoid problem? Why did he call it-

TA: No, no, no, no, it's because, it's Andreadis. And I had a suitcase that was really, really... a real big suitcase, it was a giant [?] and the crew guys hated it because I stuffed everything in it, you know, we were on a road for two years, so this was a giant, and that's where the "Big Bag" came from, because of the big suitcase, this massive-

RF: "Teddy Big Bag."

TA: "Zigzag" came from the rehearsal when I first joined the band. I kind of looked like that guy on the pack and Axl I think asked Tom again, "Who's the new guy? He looks like the guy in the Zig-Zag pack."

[...]

TA: I think I was hired because I was a a good... What do you call it? Utility guy, originally. It was actually Slash, Duff and Matt that kind of, you know, blew the charge for me to be in the band. And that's when the band went from no keyboard players to two keyboard players. You know, Axl had hired Dizzy and then those three guys said, "Well, we want Ted because he can play the harmonica part on Bad Obsession, you know, he does keys, he can sing." You know, so they went from having no keyboard players to two.

RF: And how did they find you?

TA: Through McBob. Because the Mayhues... Well, McBob worked for Carol King when I was playing keyboards with Carol King and then he said, you know, "There's this new band that kind of been around for a little bit but they got some, they're putting some keyboards on this new record and would you be interested in kind of helping out?" I said, "Yeah, sure." And the first thing I heard ever was, we used to go over to Mike's house and kind of party a little bit, and I heard Live And Let Die for the first time and I went, "Whoa! Holy smokes, who is this?" And I didn't really know anything about Guns N' Roses except Music Connection Magazine, they would be on that magazine. I'm going, "Ah, another glammy type band," but boy was I wrong.

[...]

TA: We were playing at the Roxy for Rich Bartles and Mayhue brought in Slash and Duff and I remember because they were standing behind the amps and that's the first time I met Renee, his first wife. He was with Renee, he hadn't married her yet. And they came to see me play, to see if i would work. And Slash was always into the blues and stuff, so he says, "Yeah, this guy's cool man, let's try it." You know, and because there was never auditions, nobody really auditioned for Guns and that was it.

[...]

TA: So that's how the Guns thing came about, because of the crew guys, really, of Mike Mayhue. And I always say that in any interview that Mike Mayhue was really the guy that, you know, started it all for me. And that's how most people get their big breaks, you know, it's a word of mouth, you try this guy out. I've done a couple auditions and I usually never get them because I'm goofy and I don't know what to do and I'm nervous. It's better for me to just get hired and let me do my job.

[...]

TA: When I joined Guns I didn't know much about the music and at the time they didn't really have a lot of keyboards in the songs. I didn't really play on all the songs and that was a real, I gotta say, it was a real personal... not a sore spot but it was a real eye-opener for those guys because when they asked what I charged I said, "Well, this is what Carol [King] paid me and the first thing out of Slash's mouth is, "Well, you're not going to be playing on all the songs," I said, "Dude, you're not paying me for that, you're paying me for the time I leave my front door and I come back home." They were young, they weren't aware-

Brando: They thought it was like, you know, per diem or something? Or just purchase-

TA: Well, you get per diem anyway. But because... I think I only played on, oh, I would say maybe eight of the songs, you know, in the set eight or nine of the songs, I mean, I did some sound effects and stuff like on November Rain and stuff like that, and play piano. But yeah, Dizzy was the main piano player and I played all the other secondary keyboard parts. But then those guys all had me playing on their solo records so I played on everything, any of the solos guys did. The only record I didn't play on was Izzy's, I played on Gilby's, Slash's, Duff's. I played on Matt's stuff too, I think.

[...]

TA: You know, Roberta will tell you, we had a good time on that tour. And, you know, I'd seen the world, you know. It's like you got the opportunity to see... Do you remember our first gig? I think it was Madison Square Garden, do you remember?

RF: That wasn't the first gig.

TA: It wasn't?

RF: Was it the first gig?

TA: Well, but do you remember what happened at Madison Square Garden? It was one of the first gigs that we did, it was Madison Square Garden and I'll never forget it cuz I tell the story all the time. They forgot to pick us up and we had to take cabs to the gig and we walked right into the front door with the audience. And then I went right to Opie and went, "Man, this is bullshit! We're in the band, goddammit!" Opie was not having it at that moment because, "Listen, I'll tell you, okay, we forgot you but don't you ever..." Like, "Oh."

RF: You know what, that wasn't the first time they forgot us. I remember going to Paris and we had to buy tickets to get on the plane because they left us in Paris. They left the girls in Paris and it was just like, "Are you kidding me, man?" [laughs]

TA: That kind of stuff you don't forget, you know, and it's because they weren't used to having extra members. It was those five guys at the time, well, six with Dizzy. And even Dizzy-

RF: It wasn't just that they were used to it, I think that we were a second thought, like it didn't matter, like they didn't really give it too much thought.

Brando: When you say "them" do you think to the band or to the management? Because you seem to have a good relationship with the band or is that another loaded question?

RF: [laughs]

TA: No, the band would have just gone, "Where's Ted? Where's Roberta?" No, I think it was more tour managing, you know, with that kind of stuff.

Brando: Got it.

RF: Yeah, it was Big Time-

TA: I don't even think it went up as high as Doug, I think it just went whoever the tour... I don't even remember who the tour manager was.

RF: It was John Reese. How could you forget?

TA: Oh yeah.

Brando: That was not a pleasant sound.

RF: John Reese. I think it was it was both of them, you know, because they care less, you know. But they treated you a lot better than they treated the girls, that's for sure. You know, you got-

TA: I know and I hated that. I hated that. You know, they would always say to me, "Ted, they're your responsibility, you take care of them, you make sure they're dressed right." And I'm like-

RF: What? Are you kidding me? That's the first time I've heard that.

TA: No, no, no, you know, because they didn't want to deal with singers, you know, they didn't want to deal with the background singers, you know. But little did they realize, "Wow, they're a real big part of our show." In the beginning it was like, you know, "You keep them in line, Ted," like, "I'm not gonna keep those girls in line, they're gonna do what they want, what are you talking about?"

Brando: That's insane. They're just trying to delegate for you to be the chaperone of the-

TA: I don't know if they'll ever hear this but they used to make me go out front after the show was over to the meet and greets, to meet like all the hierarchy, because they were saying, "Ted, you go out there," you know, "you go out and talk to Versace and Tyra Banks and them because we're going to stay here for a little while," I said, "Dude, they don't want to talk to me, they want you guys, you guys get out there," "Oh man, we're too tired, blah blah blah, you go out there," "Now, I'm telling you, they don't want to talk to me, they don't care about me, all they want to know is, 'Where's Slash and Axl,' you know, 'are they coming out? Are they coming out?' 'Yeah they're coming out, they're coming out, hold on'." It would always be like that, the whole time. But again, everybody was young, everybody was drinking and partying, you know, it's a whole different world now with Guns, they're all, you know, big boys, they all have management and nobody drinks, it's very professional. And, you know, they were the biggest band in the world so we could do no wrong. You know, we would sit around in our dressing rooms for hours just waiting for him to show up.

Brando: You know what, this might lead into and that's going to be part of some good fan questions, I think. And I guess, obviously, Roberta, if any of them apply to you can respond as well.

[...]

Brando: "Did you guys go out much with Slash and Duff during the tour?" Did you guys like hang out?

TA: Roberta will tell you what a pain in the ass it was to go out with those two guys.

RF: Yeah, it was a little bit crazy, it was a little crazy. But I do remember on several occasions going out with them. I remember like when we were in Paris, after that show with Lenny Kravitz, we went out to the club and it was like we were ushered to the VIP section, you know, the special section. So it was always like a big huge deal. But I thought it was fun when we did that, I don't think I did it that often but we did it, we did it.

TA: We went out. The problem was going out with those guys because they were the biggest band in the world, wherever you went there was always people chasing the cars, chasing your vehicle. Like Roberta said, if you went to a VIP section they put you in a VIP section and they roped it off right so it was just you and Slash.. And we'd be in this little VIP section but then outside of the VIP section would be all these people just staring at us, just staring at us. Like, "Can we just get out of here and just walk around a little?" And god forbid you ever go out to dinner. It's like in South America we used to have decoy cars, they would have these cars with curtains on them and we'd go out, the decoy cars would go out through the front of the hotel because the kids would camp out in front of the hotel and then we would go out to the back. And then, you know, sure enough they would find out where we were eating or something like that and they would have to pull the car up right up on the sidewalk, right to the front door of the restaurant so that there was no gap between the car and the building so you walked right into the car. And they would run after the car, they would beat on the cars and stuff. It was very scary. I mean, for, you know, I played with Carol King for god's sakes, they didn't do that.

[...]

TA: We saw [the armed guards] as protection, I mean, because nothing is going to happen with us. But after a while you got to say to yourself, "Man, I got to get out of this hotel." And it goes, "You can't go anywhere," you know, "you can't leave." And for me, because I was close friends with Slash, if he wanted to go out to a strip club or something and it was just me or Ronnie Stallnaker and Ronnie would say, "Come with us so that we can keep an eye on him," because he would get lost. He would... you know, "I'm going to the bathroom," and one of us would inevitably have to follow him because he would just... Because he, you know, he was a young kid, he wanted to hang out a little bit. And, you know, there's things that happen, you know, when you're not careful.

RF: I remember being in like Argentina and being told, "Don't wear like baseball caps or anything that looked American," you know, "hoodies and like," you know, "American attire," you know, "you'll stick out and then they'll realize that we're with Guns N' Roses." And we did. You know, like I remember, you know, just going outside wearing the clothes I wore and people being able to figure out that we were with Guns N' Roses because of the fact that we were Americans and we were in town and we were in a specific part of town and, you know, they would figure it out so it was it was really weird, you know.

TA: Especially in South America. In South America those guys are gods, even to this day. Even when solo guys go down, like Gilby, Matt and stuff like that or Duff, they pack the places because Guns N' Roses in South America are just massive. Almost to the point of being scary. When they would get up in the first song and they would jump and you could feel the whole stadium shaking. There was one [?] in Colombia that apparently was a burial ground so the ground was real soft and, you know, when they would jump they would jump in a wave because of the sound, we didn't have delay, we had one delay tower, so that they tried to keep the sound frequency steady. When we played Eastern Creek in Australia they had two sets of delay towers which meant the first set of delay towers were about a quarter of a mile back, the second set was another quarter of a mile back, that's so that the audience that was half a mile away could hear exactly what was going on on stage. And that kind of stuff you don't think about but that was how big this is.

[...]

Brando: "Ask him about the first South American show of the 1992 tour in Venezuela. I know there was a military coup and they were barely able to get out before the government got to them. I know they lost some equipment and it was part of the reason they only played one show instead of the schedule two in Colombia a few days later. That's my main question, lol."

TA: That's absolutely true. The Colombia show, we did November Rain and it rained on us. The ceiling was just a cloth covering on the grating. They have video of it so it's a really amazing to see. But the the rains were so torrential that it destroyed everything, so they opted not to play the second show, though I don't know what happened. I mean, I've heard stories but something happened and we went to the airport and they said that they were holding up a coup until we got out of the country because they didn't want the Americans in the country when it happened.

RF: I remember when we first got there that we were greeted with like these teenagers carrying Uzis, you know, like at the airport and I remember it was really like, "Oh my god, this is where we're going in?"

TA: Yeah, they so wanted to catch us bringing in drugs and stuff that they would unload the truck right on the tarmac. And then there were times where we'd have to actually have to take apart our stereos. I didn't have one but guys like Matt and Slash and Duff had these [?] cases that had stereos built into them and they would be rolled into their rooms and I remember Matt having to take his apart. They literally unscrewed the speakers to look for drugs.

RF: Yeah, they looked into like our lipstick cases and the shoes.

TA: They were just looking to want to really bring the band down because they just thought the band was not good and, you know, not a good representation of rock and roll and just were trouble makers and, "They'll bring drugs," and we were just, you know, nobody. Nobody even dared, you know.

RF: Yeah, we weren't that stupid [laughs].

[...]

Brando: "How fun are riots?"

RF: Oh my god.

Brando: I mean, we're talking about all the craziness, [...] "What is it like when your hours..." oh, that's another part of it. Does the tension or nerves build like when that's happening during the riots or-

TA: Roberta and I were at the Montreal riot, we weren't at the St. Louis riot. We joined and then when we went to Montreal and did the thing with Metallica where James Hetfield walked into the flashpot and burned his face. The story is, it's like... you know, it's not even a story, it's true, but Axl was kind of losing his voice at the time because he couldn't hear himself correctly, so he went out there to try to save the day, and again he couldn't hear himself, so he opted to leave and therein started, you know, them lifting the seats up and stuff. And I'll never forget, we were down in the dressing rooms, I was sitting there with Slash, just in an empty room, and you could hear them just going crazy upstairs.

RF: I was so scared.

TA: A really scary sound. And in walks Axl into this room that me and Slash we just found was sitting, and we're sitting there and I said, "Should I...", you know, "Stay, stay, say." And Axl you could see he was visibly shaken, saying that, you know, "They're gonna blame this on me now," you know, "All I wanted to do was... I couldn't hear myself because..." like, "I can't fucking hear myself," he kept saying, "I can't fucking," "They're going to blame me for this," and I said, "Well..." and that's when I got up and left because, you know-

RF: But Teddy, you don't remember what happened, we ended up, the girls, the horn section and the girls, ended up, we got left behind and we-

Brando: At the riot, you got left behind?

RF: The limos got you, Slash and Axl and Duff and Matt out, and Dizzy out, and the girls were left behind. And we had to wait it out because we-

TA: I didn't know.

RF: Yeah, we got left behind and I thought that they were gonna... It just sounded like they were gonna beat the doors down and get backstage and kill us. And I've never been more afraid in my life and, yeah, we were-

TA: I didn't know that, I didn't know that. Which again, which is a bad, you know, a thing on a tour, they should have had enough limousines on call, they could have been able to call to get these people out of here. But maybe they felt that it was safer to be just locked downstairs or something, who knows? I don't know. I didn't know that.

RF: I didn't think so [laughs]. I was like, those doors didn't seem to be safe. I mean. you were hearing the banging and the stuff that was going on in, you know, the stadium, it was like it really felt like Armageddon, it was so scary. And I remember just sitting backstage going, "What the hell are we gonna do?" We thought they were coming for us and then we found out that Opie and all those guys were gone and there was no way that we were gonna go through the crowd, you know. So we had to wait it out. We were back there for hours, for hours.

[...]

Being asked why they didn't leave the band after such incidents:

TA: They were the biggest band in the world so you knew you were part of something. You just had to constantly watch your back, you know, because when you're playing and there was something going on on the left side of the stage you just kind of kept your eye on it but you kept performing and just... We had enough security, I mean, we had enough security but, you know, sometimes things got out... The things that got out of hand were not so much at the gig, it was when you were at the hotel. That's when... you know, because they knew where you were staying and you didn't have all that protection. So the South America things were really scary because they could sneak into the hotels and get up to the floors and stuff.

RF: The hotels were surrounded and you would hear them singing like at all hours and-

TA: Yeah, all hours of the night.

RF: "Olé, olé!" you know, all that stuff.

TA: I have a newspaper article because she's on the front cover from an Argentinian magazine, newspaper, and... I don't know if you remember her, but she was a rabid fan of Guns, right? And she would sit out there and sing and sing and sing. Well, her father told her that he wasn't going to allow her to go to the show because he just thought it was going to be too much trouble,
"These guys are going to be too crazy," and that, "I don't want my daughter going in there, you can go to the hotel and you can chant all you want but you're not going to go to the show." She was so overwhelmed by that and not to be able to go, that she killed herself. She committed suicide. And they put her on the front page of the paper and I still have the the article with her picture. I mean, how crazy is that? That you're so into a band and that you're so into a band? Guys that write songs? Basically they're guys that write rock and roll songs. And you're not going to be able to see them that I'm going to kill myself.

[...]

Brando: What made you keep that that article then? You said you still have that newspaper.

TA: I just have a box of Guns N' Roses stuff from back then. You know, articles like that, I've got belt buckles, you know, that were collected.

Brando: Well, I guess that stuff... I mean, all trinkets and stuff makes sense but that is something, you know, I guess maybe somebody wants to forget, not forget but-

TA: No, you know, you look at that, you go, "Wow, they were a big band, they were really..." I mean, what, Roberta, what? Almost 30 years now, 25 years ago?

RF: Uhm, yeah [laughs]. Somewhere around there.

[...]

Talking about Billy Bob Thornton being nervous to sing on stage:

RF: That's why Axl would wait to go on stage because of stage fright.

TA: That's right. A lot of people don't know that. Yeah, there were certain gigs he didn't want to do because it reminded of either of his hometown or, you know, something that had to do with his life.

Brando: Really?

TA: My problem with that was like, "Well, why don't you say before we get here?" "Why don't you cancel the gig before we set all this shit up?" [laughs]

RF: "Before we set the stage up, man?"

TA: Roberta, remember, was it in London where we did that that soccer stadium and then he had a fight with Stephanie or something and canceled the gig and they called us to come down and eat the food that was all set up for him? We eventually did the gig but something happened and the gig got cancelled. Yeah, they had actually upturned the soil with bulldozers to put the stage in.

RF: Oh my god.

TA: It was that stadium in Manchester that boarded along the city, a bunch of homes, so we had to be out [?] time because they closed the gates and we wouldn't be able to get out. There was a lot of stuff like that in Europe. We were told that we had to we had to get off stage at a certain time because the transit system will stop and all these thousands of kids won't be able to get home.

RF: Kids will be stuck, right. And that's something that he didn't take into consideration when he went on late, that a lot of the parents who were taking the kids, you know, were waiting for their kids to get out of the concert, that, you know, the public transit stops at certain hours, so, like, if Axl was three hours late getting on stage these kids had a hard time getting home. And, you know, he just he didn't take that into consideration because nobody told him.

TA: Maybe they were afraid to tell him for fear that he'd go, "You know what? You know, I'll go down when I'm ready." Well, that wasn't always the case if you just told him and be upfront with him.

Brando: Like a lot of miscommunication that he just wasn't informed, not like he wanted to leave, you know, certain people behind during a riot or any of these things, he just don't know, there's too many handlers-

TA: I guarantee you he didn't know about that. If he would have known about that people would have been fired for that. No, he always looked after the girls, he always enjoyed having the girls around and I know that he would even have done anything for them. Yeah, he was really good with the girls. He always liked coming up there and dancing with them.

RF: He was always very respectful of us. I don't even remember him ever cussing in front of me. Like, in front of the audience  was one thing but like when he spoke with me he was always so utterly respectful and sweet.

TA: Yeah, yeah. I remember one time I wore a red jacket, I'll never forget this, and Robert John, the photographer, was saying, "You're gonna wear that tonight?" I'm going, "Yeah, what's wrong, what's the problem with the red jacket?" He goes, "Oh, okaaay." Well, we're getting ready to go on stage and Axl, you know, walks by me in a red jacket and red hot pants, that outfit that he used to wear, you know, with the little running shorts. During... was it Bad Obsession? When I played the harmonica he comes up and he dances next to me while i'm playing harmonica and he whispers into my ear, and he goes, "Nice jacket."

[laughs]

Brando: You must have looked like a wrestling tag team or something.

TA: Yeah, we're both in red. Robert, please tell me you got a picture of that, you got a picture of that somewhere. Because I'd love to see us both in red jackets. You know, we're tough guys, we're real tough guys.

[...]

Brando: This could be a last question, and maybe to both of you, do you either maybe together, I don't know if it's a joint memory that really sticks out from those Use Your Illusion shows, like a positive, "Hey, this is a really funny story that happened"?

RF: [laughs] Well, one does to me but I don't know if I can say it on the air.

Brando: Oh, that's up to you [laughs] Your laugh is enough.

TA: I don't know if I remember together funny but you, Roberta, would have to jog my memory, but i'm trying to think of one of the fun shows that we did was when whenever we had stars in like Brian May or Lenny Kravitz and Steven Tyler and Joe Perry. Those are always fun because-

RF: The Freddie Mercury Tribute was pretty amazing.

TA: Yeah, the Freddie Mercury was just...  I remember the funny thing was Spinal Tap came to the rehearsals in character. Yeah, they came in character at the rehearsal. And I'll never forget, I went over to look at... I don't even know what Michael Guests', his guitar-

Brando: His name was... Is it Michael McKean or Christopher Guest you mean?

TA: No, no. Christopher Guest was the blonde one, right?

Brando: Nigel.

TA: No, no, Michael McKean, yes. He had a guitar and it had eight pickups on it and instead of a whammy bar he had a big giant stick shift on it. And I went, "That's cool," and then when they finally did the show they came out as the beefeaters, you know, the beefeaters guy on the bottle, whiskey bottle, it was just like that.

[...]

TA: We thought that our incarnation of the Guns band was the best, you know, I mean we had the singers, we had the horns, and everything was done live, you know. I thought we had the best band. There's all these different incarnations of the
Guns N' Roses now but, and you know, it's fine, but ours was something special. I mean, there was a lot going on on that stage, man. And you know what, no matter how much of a butt head he was sometimes, Axl, when he was on there was nobody in the world that could touch Axl Rose. He was unbelievable, unbelievable, unbelievable singer, front man, and, you know, just in amazing shape. You know, he could do that, I mean, I couldn't do that. But so, you know, when people dog him and stuff like that, I go, "Man, you have no idea how great that guy is. But, you know, with that comes some other stuff, you know. But he was the best. Roberta will tell you, man, when he started, when he would start running up and down those ramps-

RF: Oh my god, yeah.

TA: It was really amazing to watch.

RF: I got tired of watching him.

TA: Yeah, it's like, "Jesus! Really, dude?"

Brando: Are you still friends with any of the guys? Because you've worked on obviously a lot of the different records and I know, you know, when you talk about Axl he's his own special person-

TA: Axl was the one guy that never reached out to me after the tour was over. Never to say, "Hey, thanks for..." I never talked to him again, I never saw him again. I mean, I saw him at it, you know, pictures and stuff but Axl... Duff I see, I see Matt. I just saw Matt two weeks ago or something like that. We got together, he wanted me to do the Billy Gibbons thing. I saw him then. And Slash of course, I talk to Slash all the time. But Dizzy I see... As a matter of fact I think I'm playing with Dizzy on New Year's Eve up at the up at a winery, we got-

Brando: With Hookers & Blow or something different?

TA: No, it's called Sunset Winos.

Brando: Okay. Another cool name, okay.

TA: It's Eric Singer, Eric Dover, me, Dizzy. I forget who else. It's, you know, a bunch of players and we do like one one or two gigs every once in a while.

[...]

TA: My concept of what this whole reunion thing was going to be, I had in my mind that they would do like a two and a half hour show and the first say 45 minutes, the first hour, would be... maybe, well, the first 45 minutes, would be the original five and then the second 45, a half hour, maybe an hour, would be the Use Your Illusion band, then the end of the show would be the new band. So you got everybody.

Brando: I would see that. That would be quite a production but I would see that.

RF: That would have been cool, yeah.

[...]
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2018.10.15 - Appetite for Distortion - Interview with Teddy Andreadis & Roberta Freeman Empty Re: 2018.10.15 - Appetite for Distortion - Interview with Teddy Andreadis & Roberta Freeman

Post by Blackstar Fri Jan 26, 2024 10:12 pm

Excerpts from Alternative Nation:
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Guns N’ Roses Use Your Illusion era touring members Roberta Freeman and Teddy “Zig Zag” Andreadis were recently interviewed on the Appetite for Distortion podcast. One of the topics covered was the infamous Guns N’ Roses/Metallica 1992 Montreal riot.

Teddy – “I’ll never forget we were down in the dressing rooms, I was sitting there with Slash…you can hear them going crazy…

Roberta – “I was so scared…Teddy, you don’t remember what happened…the girls, the horn section…we got left behind. The limos got you (Teddy), and Slash, and Axl, and Duff, and Matt out. And Dizzy out. And the girls were left behind and we had to wait it out.

Teddy – “I didn’t know that.”

Roberta – “It just sounded like they were going to beat the doors down and get backstage and kill us…it really felt like Armageddon.”

They both went on to detail that Axl and the band themselves had no idea they were left behind.

When asked how they feel their version of GNR compares to others…

Teddy – “I think Roberta will tell you that we thought that our incarnation of the Guns band was the best. We had the singers, we had the horns and everything was done live…I thought we had the best band. There’s all these different incarnations of the Guns N’ Roses now, and you know it’s fine, but ours was something special.”

https://www.alternativenation.net/guns-n-roses-members-feared-theyd-be-killed-after-axl-rose-slash-escape/
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2018.10.15 - Appetite for Distortion - Interview with Teddy Andreadis & Roberta Freeman Empty Re: 2018.10.15 - Appetite for Distortion - Interview with Teddy Andreadis & Roberta Freeman

Post by Soulmonster Mon Apr 01, 2024 10:41 am

Transcribed parts of this.
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Post by Soulmonster Mon Apr 01, 2024 12:04 pm

The guy on the Zig-Zag cigarette pack:

2018.10.15 - Appetite for Distortion - Interview with Teddy Andreadis & Roberta Freeman Images15
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