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THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Tue Nov 20, 2018 11:43 pm

APRIL 7, 1990 - FARM AID

I need a chapter for this show since it was the only show in 1990, since they debuted new music, and since it was the last show with Steven. I will move this upwards later.
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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Sun Dec 02, 2018 7:02 pm

SINGLES FROM THE 'USE YOUR ILLUSIONS'

Slash: I don’t think there are any singles on this record. […] I don’t mean to rock the boat or anything, but I think there’s a swearword of some sort on every song. Every potential single it’s, like, whoops, oh, well, not that one. But there’s some great songs, and I don’t care if they say “fucking” in it or if they say “shit” or if they’re talking about girls in the way we’re not supposed to [Rolling Stone, January 1991].

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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Sun Dec 02, 2018 10:11 pm

1991-1992 - INCREASING TENSION BETWEEN AXL AND SLASH

Axl and Slash had had their differences in 1989 and 1990. Slash's struggles with heroin had resulted in Axl calling him out from the stage in October, 1989, when the band opened for The Stones (which helped Slash gain sobriety). On the other hand, Axl had been taking a increasing leadership role in the band as his band mates struggled with addiction, and while Slash was now in a productive physical state, Axl's notorious temper and mental instability that resulted in marriage problems and confrontations with the police and his neighbor that resulted in , vexed on Slash in early 1991 as it delayed the making of the 'Use Your Illusion's'.

Slash: "Well, [Axl's problems are] a pain in the ass, and they keep things from getting done. I’m the most uptight about all of this. It’s just my nature — Axl thinks I’m this sort of sick-minded workaholic. And it’s true — in some ways, I do get uptight. I can get very negative about it. But there are moments when it [Axl’s troubles] really gets in the way of what I think is productive, and we end up spending a lot of money. Sometimes I think Axl has no idea, or has a very slight idea, of what the financial reality is. I mean, to me $400,000 or whatever to make a record is ludicrous. Of course, if I was to say that to Axl outright, he’d say I don’t know what he’s going through, and there’d be a fight right there. That’s the way we’ve always been — there’s something I can’t relate to or vice versa, and that’s where we butt heads. So I just sit there with my head between my knees, freaking out…But Axl’s craziness drives me crazier than it does Axl, unbeknownst to him. And that’s the truth. […] Axl is like a magnet for problems. I’ve never met anybody like him. He’s the kind of guy that would get a toothbrush stuck down his throat because that particular toothbrush happened to be defective. [..] I mean, shit goes on with that guy, and if you talked to him, he’d tell you the same thing" [Rolling Stone, January 1991].

And:

Slash: "I don’t want to talk about Axl, because everybody is constantly trying to pit us against each other. You know, they’re trying to put two fucking Japanese fighting fish in the same bowl. We’ve always been the same. We have our ups and downs, and we butt heads. As long as I’ve known Axl, we’ve had so many differences that have been like the end of the line as far as we were concerned. I think that happens with most singers and guitar players, or whatever that cliché is. It might look a little intense on the outside, seeing all this shit that we’re going through, but it makes for a tension that’s — in a morbid kind of way — really conducive to the music we collaborate on. But as far as Axl goes, he is the best singer-lyricist around" [Rolling Stone, January 1991].
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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Mon Dec 10, 2018 7:17 pm

MATT BEFORE GUNS N' ROSES

Matt:  I just always wanted to play drums. I got my first set of drums when I was about 5 years old. You know, I was just always banging on things, I don’t know. My first band I was really into was probably Black Sabbath. You know, during, like, junior high school. I guess that’s what made me hit drums so hard, because I saw Black Sabbath and, you know, his drumming was just so amazing, Bill Ward, back in those days. And I liked his power. And then I got into Zeppelin and all the stuff that the rest of the guys were into, you know, Aerosmith and.., [Special TV, 1991].
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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Mon Dec 10, 2018 8:33 pm

1991-1993 - DRUGS AND BOOZE AGAIN

As Rock in Rio II was happening rumors had it that Izzy and Duff had "sworn off all drugs and alcohol for the last 60 days" [Kerrang! January 1991].
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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Mon Dec 10, 2018 8:39 pm

A chapter about Axl and GN'R running into problems with other bands during the 1991-1993 touring.

Mick Wall: "Upon their arrival at the Maracana, Axl Rose announced that neither he nor Guns N’ Roses would take the stage  that night if a) Judas Priest  used any of their pyrotechnics;  b) played more than one encore, c) didn’t cut their set by at least 20 minutes and d) used the motorcycle.

Eventually, after much to-ing and fro-ing of messengers between the opposing dressing rooms, it was agreed to allow Priest to play their two encores and Rob was told he could keep the motorcycle. But Priest were still forced to drop five numbers from their set... and the use of their pyrotechnics was definitely ruled out.

But if Guns N’ Roses thought that putting a vice on the performance of Judas Priest would make their own entrance more plausible, the results had exactly the opposite affect, Priest turning in a show that left the Maracana audience stunned and howling for more.

Rob Halford, in particular, was brilliant, the best I’ve seen him in years, and the band were - as advertised - pure steel.

IF ANYTHING, being treated like that only made us more determined to put on a really hard show,” said a still- pouring-with-sweat Halford afterwards. “You know, I think it sorts out the professionals — the men from the boys. I mean, we’ve dealt with all this before.

“And I think that, more than anything, when people try and pull a stunt like that on you it always backfires on them. It’s like, what are you trying to prove here anyway? Do you think that by taking away those things you’re gonna restrict the band’s ability to get a crowd reaction, or affect our performance as musicians?

“There’s no way! We’ve been around too many years to let something like that affect us. Out of all the people at this Rock In Rio festival, Priest have got the longest history. We’ve made more albums, we’ve done more festivals, we’ve done more tours.

“So it’s easier for us to handle but I still can’t understand that kind of attitude problem. It just doesn’t make sense.”

And neither did the pallid attempt at an explanation by one of the road crew offered to Steffan Chirazi and I the next day.

“Guns got pissed off when New Kids On The Block used their side-stage ramps without asking the other night,” he said with the kind of wide-eyed chewing gum sincerity only a true American flunky can summon, “and now they’re paranoid about everything.”

Well, he got that part right.

I didn’t know what to say. Steffan did, though. “Well,” he huffed as though he were about to spontaneously combust, “I think it’s come to something when Guns N’ Roses can be victimised by a bunch of miming useless twats!” Out of the mouths of babes and burger princes, as they say..." [Kerrang! January 1991].
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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Mon Dec 10, 2018 11:23 pm

1991- THE PRESS III

In March 1991 the band's relation with the media had become so strained that anyone who wanted to interview them had to sign a contract. According to Los Angeles Times, this "two-page document gives Guns N' Roses copyright ownership and approval rights over any "article, story, transcript or recording connected with the interview," control over any advertising or promotion involving the story and indemnifies the band from any damages or liabilities in connection with the story" [Los Angeles Times, March 1991]. Even photographers had to sign  "a similar three-page contract" "with similar clauses, including band ownership of all pictures taken by any photographers" [Los Angeles Times, March 1991].

Alan Niven would defend the decision:

We're fed up with being misused and abused by all the scurrilous (scum) who pass themselves off as journalists and photographers. I can't begin to tell you how many writers and photographers have misrepresented themselves, made up quotes or made money selling substandard photos of the band. It's amazing, but people can peddle any kind of (junk) if Axl's picture is on it. The press always says, 'Trust us,' but whenever we do, we get screwed. We started (using these contracts) with the European press, who are notoriously untrustworthy and incompetent, and we've found it keeps incompetence and inaccuracy to a minimum. We're not trying to deprive people of their opinions. But we do want a formal document that will prevent the abuses we've endured in the past [Los Angeles Times, March 1991].
So would Duff:

The critics are looking for us to fall on our a__. The group went from being critics' whipping boys to being "the press' darling, then the press turns around on you [Detroit Free Press, May 1991].
The outcome was that some magazines refused to sign the contract whereas others did. Some that signed included Guitar World and Venice, while Rolling Stone, Playboy, Spin and Penthouse refused [Los Angeles Times, March 1991].

The musical editor of Rolling Stone magazine, Jim Henke, was incredulous: "I can't believe anyone would go along with anything like this. We're always having people asking to be on the cover, but we've never had anyone try to dictate the editorial content of a story. I have to wonder whether the band is going to still go through with this even after their album comes out" [Los Angeles Times, March 1991].

The band's publicist, Bryn Breidenthal, had the following comment: "My immediate reaction was that this might provoke a lot of hostility. But the band is just reacting to all the inaccurate information that's been disseminated about them. In my 25 years of doing publicity I've never dealt with a press contract before, but when you deal with this band, you deal with a lot of firsts" [Los Angeles Times, March 1991].

Matt would argue that it was only meant to stop some magazines:

[The contract] was for people we didn't want to talk to. It's been blown all out of proportion, because there's plenty of stuff the band wants to talk about openly [Chicago Tribune, May 1991].
In the end, as indicated by Matt, Rolling Stone did not have to sign the contract. As Kim Neely, a senior writer at Rolling Stone would say, "The thing about that contract has really been blown out of proportion." Neely would say she didn’t have to sign any contract because “there are certain magazines that have never done them wrong in the past, and Rolling Stone is one of those magazines. We submitted two names to them, and they said either would be okay.... I’m a big fan" [New York Magazine, August 1991].

In August, spokesperson for Guns N' Roses would say the contracts were not in use any more [New York Magazine, August 1991].

A Guns Ν’ Roses spokesman says the notorious contract is no longer in use.

The band's strained relationship with the press also resulted in the song 'Get in the Ring' (with the early title 'Why Do You Look At Me?') that would end up on 'Use Your Illusion II':

A song called “Why do you look at me?” and then (?) “When you hate me” it’s about the press. It’s like, you know, “Why do you look at me when you hate me? Why do you look at me when you know I hate you too?” It’s about the press, you know, writing shit they have no idea about. And so if they’re getting so hardcore about us and they don’t like us, why do they write about us? You know, that’s something to say about them [Special TV, 1991].
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