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SoulMonster

1992.01.09 - The Summit, Houston, USA

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1992.01.09 - The Summit, Houston, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Wed Aug 22, 2012 9:54 pm

Date:
January 9, 1992.

Venue:
The Summit.

Location:
Houston, TX, USA.

Setlist:
03. Live and Let Die
[Setlist unknown]

Line-up:
Axl Rose (vocals), Gilby Clarke (rhythm guitarist), Slash (lead guitarist), Duff McKagan (bass), Dizzy Reed
(keyboards) and Matt Sorum (drums).

Next concert: 1992.01.10.
Previous concert: 1992.01.07.


Last edited by Soulmonster on Wed Aug 22, 2012 10:08 pm; edited 2 times in total
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Re: 1992.01.09 - The Summit, Houston, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Wed Aug 22, 2012 10:00 pm

Review:

Sold-out crowd for Guns N' Roses
RICK MITCHELL Staff
FRI 01/10/1992 HOUSTON CHRONICLE, Section A, Page 22, 3 STAR Edition

Guns N' Roses welcomed a sold-out crowd to the rock 'n' roll jungle Thursday night at The Summit.

The controversial hard-rock band is on tour in support of its albums "Use Your Illusions, Volume I" and Volume 2, which have sold more than 2 million copies apiece since their release in late 1991.

Guns N' Roses took the stage at 11:20 p.m., more than four hours after the doors opened. During the long intermission following Soundgarden's opening set, the crowd amused itself by cheering for dancing young women who removed their tops. Those who didn't were booed.

Vocalist Axl Rose appeared wearing a red waistcoat over tight red shorts and black hiking boots. On the third song of the set, he led a sing along of 15,000 on a rowdy version of Paul McCartney's "Live and Let Die".

The band has cultivated a bad boy image since its 1987 debut album, "Appetite for Destruction".

At a concert last year in St. Louis, fans caused several thousand dollars' worth of damage to an outdoor auditorium after Rose jumped into the audience to prevent someone from taking his photograph.

The group left the stage and the fans responded by hurling chairs and trashing sound equipment. Dozens of people were injured, including several policemen. Rose refused to apologize for his actions.

Guns N' Roses appeals to a wide range of fans.

"They're carefree, they're rebellious, they don't care what people think about them," said Heather Larkins, 21, of Kingwood.

"A lot of us are like that. I wouldn't say they're sexy, but it makes you want to follow them."

Larkins' date, Jess Flores, agreed.

"They're totally original, that's what really gets to me," added Flores, 25, of Houston. "They don't copy anybody. They're definitely at a peak now."

The median age of the crowd appeared to be about 21, but there was a smattering of older rock fans as well.

Kenneth Plummer, 39, of Lake Charles, La., who came to the show with his daughter, LaToshia, 17, said he hears some of the same rock 'n' roll spirit in Guns N' Roses that attracted him to the Rolling Stones and ZZ Top.

"I like rock 'n' roll," said Plummer. "The Stones and ZZ Top, that's for our generation. Guns N' Roses is for this generation. If they don't split up, they'll be here."

Police presence outside The Summit was heavier than usual for a concert. One policeman estimated there were 12 to 15 extra officers on duty, in addition to private security guards hired by concert promoter Pace Productions.

Rock fans arriving for the concert were met by gay-rights picketers, prompting an angry exchange of words.

Houston's chapter of Queer Nation organized the protest, titled "Pansies Against Roses," after Rose allegedly told "Rolling Stone" magazine he liked to "beat up faggots after a concert, to relieve stress."

The protesters carried signs and chanted, "Racist, sexist, anti-gay -- Guns N' Roses, go away!" One sign read, "Gay bashers are closet cases."

"We support Axl's right to free speech," said Tracy Brown of Queer Nation. "But we don't want to support bigotry."

As the protest continued, several dozen hecklers gathered outside The Summit. At times, their chants of "Guns N' Roses!" and "Faggots go home!" drowned out the protesters.

There was no violence, but Brown called the action "our scariest protest to date."

"I ain't got no problem with them being gay," said Guns N' Roses fan Odis Thomas, 20, of Lake Charles. "That's their business. But if they don't want to listen to it, they can go home instead of coming here and inflicting their views on us."

Protester Scott Simmons carried a sign reading, "Rock and roll is for queers too."

"I like Guns N' Roses music," said Simmons, 28, of Houston. "I just don't like their attitude."

The protest broke up as The Summit doors opened at 7 p.m.

Rose referred to the protest early in the set, saying, "Some people will just do anything for publicity."

Guns N' Roses is to perform again tonight at The Summit.
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Re: 1992.01.09 - The Summit, Houston, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Wed Aug 22, 2012 10:05 pm

That alleged quote in the review about Axl saying to Rolling Stone Magazine that he "liked to beat up faggots after a concert, to relieve stress" must be wrong. At least I am very sure it hasn't been published before. Regardless, if it was said it clearly was a joke.
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