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THE HISTORY - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

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Post by Soulmonster on Sun Sep 01, 2019 7:26 am

JULY 1994 - THE GUNS N' ROSES PINBALL MACHINE


In early 1994 Slash would talk about a Guns N' Roses pinball machine that was slated for launch in the summer.

It's almost done. I've been working... Actually, to tell you the truth, when the earthquake hit [on January 17, 1994], I'd already planned on going to Chicago to work with the Data East Company, who make awesome pinball games. And I came out to Chicago to work on the artwork for it. So, it's sort of like, my little project, that I'm working with them. And it should be out in the summer. […] there's like 13 songs on it [97.7 HTZ_FM, January 1994].
I like pinball because it’s physical and it’s definitely more rock ‘n’ roll. Video games are wimpy. I got really hooked at it, you know? And I thought, well, they haven’t done a rock ‘n’ roll machine in about 15 years. I think the last one was Ted Nugent. So I thought Guns could probably get away with making a machine at this point. […] It’s definitely a hip game. Plus, it’s the first game that’s ever had real guitars. It’s the loudest one made today. So I’m really proud of it [MTV, October 1994].
The pinball game would feature unreleased music from GN'R:

There’s a song called Ain’t Going Down, which we just never finished, and we have a chorus for it, so I figure we’d use that, you know, and finally get it out there. So now that we’ve done it we have to actually record it [MTV, October 1994].
'Ain't Going Down' had previously been intended to be released on 'The Spaghetti Incident?' [see previous section].


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Post by Soulmonster on Sun Sep 01, 2019 9:59 pm

JULY 1994-FEBRUARY 1995
SLASH'S SNAKEPIT


But if we take a long hiatus again, I'd like to put out, not really a solo record, but something with another band—a temporary thing that I'd control. It would be geared towards an almost heavy metal funk-rock concept—music with killer rock and roll vocals and the most awesome riffs. Almost like "Jungle," only a little bit tighter and heavier. A long time ago, Aerosmith got close; Beck has a couple of magic moments too. But I don't want it to be a guitar record where I'm off on some solo trip, 'cause I think that's really boring.

I always said I would never do a solo record, I said I didn't need to – but finally I found out I certainly do.

___________________________________________________________________________________________

With the band on hiatus Slash needed another outlet for his music, the music that had already allegedly been rejected by Axl. Doing something on his own outside of Guns N' Roses was not a new thought to Slash:

I plan on doing [a solo record] one day. I'm sure [Axl] does as well.


By August 1991, Slash would state that he intended to do a record with another band if Guns N' Roses experienced a long downtime:

I plan on doing [a solo record] one day. I'm sure [Axl] does as well.


In early 1992 he was asked about a solo record again:

Ha! As far as me doing my own thing, I haven’t given it much thought because I’ve been too busy concentrating on Guns. It’s kept me pretty occupied and I can’t really look at anything other than day by day, that way I don’t get any nasty surprises when things fuck up!


When asked again in July 1992 Slash would say that other than Duff's planned solo record there were no other solo record from band members in plan [Rockline, July 13, 1992], and in January 1994 he would dismiss the idea that he would make a solo record [Rockline, January 3, 1994].

At this point, you know, as we speak, I don't have any interest in it. 'Cause what would I do? Like, some dumb guitar record? So, I don't need to do that. I play with enough people and I got enough freedom within the confines of what it is all about. We don't really have any confines. Because everybody freaks out. [laughs] And, anyway. So, no I don't have any interest in doing it.

I don’t know. I mean, I play enough with other people, and then Guns N’ Roses is a vehicle for me to be able to be – more or less to do everything that I want to do. So it just seems boring to me. It’s like, nothing against Gary Moore or Steve Vai or... I’m not good enough to be one of those who, like, make a guitar record and it doesn’t interest me, so I’d have to start a new band, which I’m not gonna do.

I’m working on stuff at home, but I work with the other guys in the band on it. It sorta sounds like a cliché, but as far as I’m concerned, Guns is more or less a vehicle for doing my own thing. I don’t wanna do a Gary Moore type record or anything like that. I love Gary Moore and everything, but that’s all kinda dull. Guitar records bore me. I’m not interested in trying to express myself as a guitar player, other than the fact that I go and play with all these different people. I jam a lot and I’ve played on a lot of records. If I need to let off some steam somewhere, I can always go and play with whoever. But as far as doing a solo record is concerned, I don’t think I’ve got anything to prove.

I'd like to think that I wouldn't have to. Y'know, Guns is a great vehicle for me to do pretty much anything I want to do. But then, to keep myself playing all the time, when Guns aren't recording or touring, I go and I play with other people. So I pretty much do everything that I want, and I really would hate to do one of those guitar albums, like fuckin' Steve Vai or Joe Satriani, because it's really dull.


With Duff and Axl allegedly rejecting the music that Slash, Matt and Gilby had been working on, Slash decided to use the songs in a side project. Gilby would first mention this in June 1994 when he was asked what would happen to the songs he and Slash had worked on:

It could be Slash’s album, this is what it could be, because Slash has been talking about making his own album. You know, because Duff did it, I did it, he can do it (laughs). He has some really, really good songs and, like I said, it’s gonna be a while before GN’R is gonna do a record, and this stuff isn’t really for GN’R, so he’s been talking about doing his own album. So he’s been working with me and Matt on it, you know, just trying to get it in together.


For Slash, this decision was likely fueled by a strong desire to get back on the road as soon as possible to avoid the lingering temptations of sedentary life in Los Angeles, but also frustration with not being able to see eye to eye with Axl on the direction of the band and wanting to do something with songs he felt were good and should be heard.

Explaining the contradiction between consistently saying he wouldn't do it, and then doing it:

Actually, I've been saying that I would never do [a solo record]. But in the back of my mind I knew that I was contradicting myself, because I knew I'd end up doing it.


Talking about why he decided to make his own record:

This whole idea came about because I was working on material for the next Guns album at my home studio - but then everything had to be put on hold, because Axl Rose was dealing with the lawsuits brought against him by his ex-girlfriend Stephanie Seymour and his ex-wife Erin Everly.


And again without mentioning that he initially wrote the songs for Guns N' Roses but that they were rejected:

The band was off the road for a while, and everybody just kinda split up after being on the road for two and a half years. Everybody sort of did their own thing.

I built a studio (called Snakepit) in my house and started writing songs. The material that I wrote, like 17 songs or something, Matt played drums on and I played the arrangements and we recorded it. After all that was set and done I was like, 'Now what will I do with all this stuff?' We had so much fun doing it that I wanted to keep the momentum going and didn't want to sit around. This was a few months ago, and we recorded it really quickly.


Slash would even go as far as to say Axl had encouraged him to do a solo record with the rejected material:

At one point I was actually encouraged to do a solo record because this material was a little bit, as Axl put it, 'too retro’.

I was hoping it would work with Guns. I was just writing at home, I built a studio, and I was experimenting.[…] It's a simple studio and Matt would be there to help me arrange the stuff. […] So I wrote all these songs and played the demo for Axl and he just wasn't interested. I said, "But this is really what I want Guns to do," and he wasn't into it. So I had all this material and Axl had all these lawsuits going on and he wouldn't have time to get into writing at that point anyway. So he sort of suggested I did a solo record.


Originally, the name of Slash's solo record was "SVO Snakepit" [The Newcastle Journal, July 14, 1994]. SVO stood for "Slash's Very Own" [Kerrang! June 25, 1994].

Slash considered former Quire-boys vocalist Jonathan "Spike" Gray to sing on the record, along with 5 others [The Newcastle Journal, July 14, 1994; Kerrang! July 16, 1994]. Other singers who tried out for the spot were Michael Monroe (Hanoi Rocks) and Ron Evans (Little Ceasar) [Metal Hammer, February 1995]. In June, Slash would also say he had been taking singing lessons, but that he doesn't think he has the "personality to carry it off!" [Kerrang! June 25, 1994]. He would also say they considered many different singers, but that it would be impractical in regards to touring:

But I thought if we make a record, we should tour. I don’t wanna put out a record and waste it. So we can’t obviously take all these guys on the road. So I thought I’ll sing and I took some vocal lessons. I just don’t have the personality for it. It’s hard enough for me to sit here and talk to you guys.


Eventually Slash would choose the 41th singer to audition, Eric Dover [The Gazette, January 26, 1995]:

Adam, my guitar tech, would take them up to the house, put a tape in and go, ‘Sing.’ Eric wrote Beggars & Hangers-On to a piece of music that was just called Song in D. And I heard the tape the next day and was like, ‘OK, that’s the guy’.


In June it would also be claimed the new band with Slash would be called "Gak", a slang terms for 'cocaine' [Hit Parader, December 1994]. It would also be reported it would be co-produced by Slash and Mike Clink [Kerrang! June 25, 1994].

In July, though, it would be reported it was Slash's new band that would be called "SVO Snakepit", and that it also featured Matt and Gilby [Los Angeles Times, July 17, 1994].

I have all the songs written now and I’m pushing on with recording the basic tracks, using Matt, Gilby and Mike (Inez - Alice In Chains’ bassist). But I still haven’t decided on the person to sing with me. I’ve narrowed down the choice to five guys. They’re all experienced and have had albums released. But I don’t want to name any of them at this stage. It would be unfair to raise anyone’s hopes, only to dash them. […] As far as my record’s concerned, I’m delighted with the way everything is going. It’s gonna sound heavy and ballsy, just wait and see!


Slash would later say he did the record in two weeks, and that this caused a conflict between him and Axl [more on this in later chapters]:

At one point I was actually encouraged to do a solo record because this material was a little bit, as Axl put it, 'too retro.’ So I just took the material and said, 'It’s mine now.’ […] He got pretty upset about that but he did say do a solo record. But then two weeks later it was done.


By October 1994, the name had been reduced to just "Snakepit" with Slash explaining why he didn't want his name attached to the band name:

The reason it’s called “Snakepit” and not “Slash” something or “Slash” in general, is it’s really a band, so we collaborated a lot, because, for one, we were forced to, and for two because none of us have really all worked together as a band. So we all had a lot of input to get the basic idea across as to what we all sound like together.


He would emphasize that it was a band later, too:

Another thing is, I know I say my 'Snakepit' album, but it's really a band. I'm only doing the press because everyone else seems to know who I am at this point. Eventually I'd like to make it known as a band, actually. I don't want it to sound like it's Slash's little group. I don't know if this is just a one-off. We'll see what happens.


In November it would be reported that the name of the record would be, 'It's Five O' Clock Somewhere' [RAW Magazine, November 1994]. It would also be said that Slash's plan was to release his record in February 1995 and then go on an "extensive" tour in support of it [RAW Magazine, November 1994].

Explaining the band and record name:

The name Snakepit came from the fact that we recorded the demos for this actual album in the room that’s right next to the snake pit, in my house, which is where all the snakes are (laughs). And we just called it Snakepit because it was the easiest thing to come up with. As far as “It’s Five O’ Clock Somewhere,” that’s a whole another story. It’s got its obvious connotations, but, basically, I went to England one time with Guns and went to the bar. It was about 10:00 in the morning, and I said, “I know it’s only 10:00, but give me a Jack and Coke; and the bartender looked me dead in the eye and he goes, “It’s 5:00 somewhere.” So it stuck in my head ever since then, and so when we were doing this thing - basically that’s what the whole album is about, you know? It’s 5:00 somewhere, give me a break.


The press would also report that there was a big fight between Slash and Axl over Slash's solo plans, including a rumor that Axl had sued Slash over Slash's decision to use the songs he had worked on on a solo record [RAW Magazine, November 1994]. RAW Magazine would deny that this rumor was true, but state that the conflict between the two band members was very real [RAW Magazine, November 1994]. Slash's plan was to release his record in February 1995 and then go on an "extensive" tour in support of it [RAW Magazine, November 1994].

By now Slash had chosen his singer, former Jellyfish sideman Eric Dover [RAW Magazine, November 1994]. It would also be reported that Gilby would play with them, and also open the shows with his solo band [RAW Magazine, November 1994].

In early 1995 Slash was asked why Duff wasn't also part of Snakepit:

It would be Guns without Axl if Duff were playing on it.


Talking about his decision to do Snakepit and tour:

A year ago when we came back from 2 1/2 years of playing stadiums. It was hard work, but I like touring, so that part wasn't so bad. But every time I get home from a long stint like that, I would get in a bad place. I wouldn't know what to do. I'm not good at sitting at home, so I would get into whatever drugs. So this time I thought, "I'm not getting strung out again." It's old. It's over. I'm not into doing that anymore.


And discussing how the record was basically how he would like Guns N' Roses to be:

I was hoping it would work with Guns. I was just writing at home, I built a studio, and I was experimenting. […] So I wrote all these songs and played the demo for Axl and he just wasn't interested. I said, "But this is really what I want Guns to do," and he wasn't into it. So I had all this material and Axl had all these lawsuits going on and he wouldn't have time to get into writing at that point anyway. So he sort of suggested I did a solo record.

So the songs are my representation of what Guns would sound like if I was at the helm. And it's probably good that I did it outside of Guns because I explored a lot of avenues I didn't normally get to. I had to write lyrics, and I had to get the melodies, and I had to get the songs into a cohesive state where they were worth showing to anybody. It's a real down to the bare bones kind of record, and I like that.

There's just two guitars, then a lead, and that's it. I've got Gilby playing on one side and me on the other – the same approach that I use for almost any Guns record. In fact I think Use Your Illusion was the most complicated I've ever gotten. I have gotten more into blending an acoustic with an electric lately, though, and there is some acoustic, some slide, some voice-box, some wah-wah pedal, some mandolin, but that's about it. I used the Les Paul, 12-string and the Martin acoustic and a Guild.


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Post by Soulmonster on Mon Sep 02, 2019 10:34 am

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 1994
AXL WANTS THE SONGS


In 1994, the press would report that there was a big fight between Slash and Axl over Slash's solo plans, including a rumor that Axl intended to sue Slash over his decision to use the songs he had worked on on a solo record [Kerrang!, November 5, 1994: RAW Magazine, November 1994].

According to the rumor, Axl didn't want Slash to release all the songs that Slash, Matt and Gilby had been writing, on Slash' solo record, but instead keep them for Guns N' Roses [Kerrang! November 5, 1994]. This is interesting considering earlier reports that Axl and Duff had rejected the material flat-out. Perhaps there was a misunderstanding or perhaps Axl wanted them, or some of them, for a future release.

Slash would also later claim that Axl had encouraged him to take the songs for a Slash solo record:

At one point I was actually encouraged to do a solo record because this material was a little bit, as Axl put it, 'too retro.’ So I just took the material and said, 'It’s mine now.’ […] He got pretty upset about that but he did say do a solo record. But then two weeks later it was done. […] That sorta blew his mind.

I was hoping it would work with Guns. I was just writing at home, I built a studio, and I was experimenting.[…] It's a simple studio and Matt would be there to help me arrange the stuff. […] So I wrote all these songs and played the demo for Axl and he just wasn't interested. I said, "But this is really what I want Guns to do," and he wasn't into it. So I had all this material and Axl had all these lawsuits going on and he wouldn't have time to get into writing at that point anyway. So he sort of suggested I did a solo record.

Axl at some point decided that he wanted certain songs back and they were already - the album was already finished by that point. It sort of was a shock to him that it was done so quickly, you know? And then he was like, “Well, I want those songs back,” and I was like, “No, it’s too late, they’re gone.”


RAW Magazine would later deny that the litigation rumor was true, but state that the conflict between the two band members was very real [RAW Magazine, November 1994].

Slash would comment on the litigation:

Legally, it's all verbal stuff. We have never gone into litigation of any kind with this. Axl just thought that the songs were rightfully Guns' because they were written with the intention of them being Guns songs. I disagree.

[A lawsuit] was brought up; I’m surprised that anybody knew about that - I never went public with it. What happened basically is ever since Guns N’ Roses... even when they first started, it’s always been my thing to be the glue that keeps things organised. That’s always what I’ve done. Not to say that Axl or Duff don’t help, it’s just that that’s always been my thing. I live, sleep, breathe Guns N’ Roses. That’s all I ever did.

So all of a sudden for me to get up and disappear really blew Axl’s mind, ’cos he’s always had me to lean on. All of a sudden he wants to do a record. Now, I’ve waited around for years at a time for him, so when I ended up hanging out with these guys and made a record...

Axl had a tape of demos with no vocals on it that he turned down on me, so I said, ‘Okay, well no big deal, I’ll write more stuff, whatever you don’t like about this particular direction ... What direction do you want to go? Because I’m not really sure what you’re getting at because I wanted to do a real hard, back-to-basics kind of thing?’. So he wasn’t sure and we really weren’t getting on that well: he fired Gilby and that started a whole big slew of f**kin, you know, that caused a mess between us for a while. Then Eric, Matt, Gilby, Mike and myself went in the studio to do a record like that! (snaps his fingers).

All of a sudden Axl decides he wants some of the songs back and I go, ‘They’re gone!’ And he goes, ‘You couldn’t have done a record that fast!’ I said, ‘Well, it’s done!’. So he says, ‘Well, I’m gonna sue you!’. ‘Like, for what?’. ‘Because they’re supposed to be Guns N’ Roses material!’. ‘No they’re not, I wrote them!’.

He has this sort of distorted image in his head that because I’m such a part of Guns N’ Roses that anything that comes out between this hand and this hand is Guns’ material. At the time I wasn’t thinking about doing any kind of side-project or starting another band, I was just writing. I was sitting around the house, I had a new studio, and when he said he didn’t like them I was like, ‘Cool! Whatever!’.

Then I started hanging out with these guys and we had such a good time I thought, ‘We should record this, because we have a decent band,’ so we went and did it. Then he was like, ‘Woah, wait a second, slow down!’. Axl moves at like a quarter of the speed that I do. That’s always been one of the issues with Guns N’ Roses, that’s just the way it is, always has been. I mean, Axl’s awesome but sometimes I need to get back to having to get to work on time. I need that drive. Not just be some sort of lazy Rock star waiting around till whenever.

[…]

[Axl] just works slower. He takes things a little bit more seriously than I do. And he has to wait till the timing’s right, and this and that. I mean, I can write a song at the same time as falling out of a car! I just sort of do what I do and I don’t like to think about it too much, whereas he does like to think about it. So that’s one of the things, opposites attract; that’s one of the great things between the two of us, but at the same time this happened so quickly for him he was like, ‘Woah! Woah! Stop! What happened?”


Being asked if Axl really threated to sue him::

Yeah, yeah, but we worked it out. That’s just Axl’s way.


It would also be speculated that Axl owed the band name and logo and could in theory continue the band with a new lineup [Kerrang! November 5, 1994; RAW Magazine, November 1994].

Looking back:

The typical fights between guys in bands, between Axl and I, have been blown way out of proportion. There was a little bit of concern about me taking off to do [Slash’s Snakepit], but I really needed to do it. I need to get that vibe back. I don’t want to feel like some unobtainable rock-star character. This is grounding me.


In February 1995, Slash would say he and Axl had "come to terms" with the fact that Slash had taken the songs for himself:

And so we’ve come to terms about it at this point, but there was a little bit of friction there for a while.


Sash would also imply that Axl considered all music Slash makes while a band member of Guns N' Roses as belonging to Guns N' Roses, and that he didn't like Slash's collaborations with other artists:

[…] [Axl]’s got this distorted vision, or thought, that when I apply my talents to the guitar - or however we wanna call it – that it’s automatically Guns N’ Roses material, which isn’t the case. That means Lenny Kravitz stuff, Iggy Pop, Michael Jackson and Carole King would all be Guns N’ Roses material (laughs). That’s not the case at all.

When I first got into this thing, there were certain songs he wanted back, like he thought anything – like any time that I apply this hand and this hand with a guitar in between, it’s supposed to be designated Guns N’ Roses material, Guns territory, which wasn’t the case.


In an interview published on March 1, 1995, Slash would claim the Snakepit songs hadn't been intended for Guns N' Roses:

I didn’t write them for anybody! […] I’d have a riff and Matt would come up with a beat, and by the end of the day we’d have a song. We didn’t take it so seriously ’cos we had no reason to.


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Post by Soulmonster on Mon Sep 02, 2019 10:57 am

OCTOBER 1994 - SLASH INSULTS KEITH RICHARDS


In the first half of 1994, The Rolling Stones would finish their upcoming album The Voodoo Lounge in Los Angeles, and Slash would hang out with Keith Richards [The Chicago Tribute, February 3, 1995]. Then, when The Stones toured the album and came to The Rose Bowl in Pasadena in late October, Slash and Renee would have seats for the show:

Slash: "“We were saving a couple of seats for our friends who went to the bathroom, and these other people tried to take them. I said, ‘These seats are taken,’ they start arguing, and we said, ‘[Expletive] you’ and left. The next day, Keith calls, all ticked off. Turns out the people we argued with are his in-laws.

I can’t count all the magazines I’ve read, and how, whether true or not, that’s how we get to know about our rock star heroes. That’s all I ever expected as a kid. And now suddenly it’s gotten to the point where I’m getting yelled at by Keith Richards. One way or another, that’s sorta cool” [The Chicago Tribune, February 3, 1995].


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Post by Soulmonster on Mon Sep 02, 2019 11:10 am

OCTOBER 1994
SYMPATHY FOR THE DEVIL


In October 1994 it would reported that the band had recorded a cover of Rolling Stones' 'Sympathy for the Devil' [MTV, October 1994] intended for release on January 2, 1995 [Raw Magazine, November 1994]. The song would be featured on the soundtrack for the movie 'Interview with a Vampire' [Raw Magazine, November 1994]. In an interview in February 1995, Slash would say that they were in the studio "doing" 'Sympathy for the Devil' on Halloween 1994, in other words on October 31, 1994 [The Howard Stern Show, February 1, 1995].

Slash would say he had thought it was a good idea to just to get the band together again:

It was an offer that I thought it was a great plot to get Guns more or less together and just start working as a unit. But I think we pulled it off really well, compared to a lot of other bands that would have been offered to do it, that I don’t think could have gotten to the vibe as well.


But later, Slash would be critical about the idea:

The movie is about a subject matter I’m very romantic about. It was like this gothic brat pack thing. I like Brad Pitt, but I like him better as a hick. […] ['Sympathy' was] a song that didn’t need to be copied.

Tom Cruise? As Lestat? I don’t think so. I think it’s going to be pretty lousy. But I went to go see the screening anyway, as a favor, and the Stones version was in there at the time and I thought it was fine, because the movie bored me to tears. Axl, of course - always being my nemesis, right? – went and saw it, and loved it. So he goes, “Let’s do the song.” I thought it would be a great vehicle to get everybody’s creative juices flowing and sort of start getting geared towards the next Guns record.
The O-Zone, February 1995


Slash would also say that Axl wanted to do it, and that Slash saw it as an opportunity to "get the band into one room and get die wheels rolling for what would be pre-production for the next Guns album" [Detroit Free Press, December 22, 1994]. But things didn't plan out that way. According to Slash, Axl didn't show up resulting in Slash, Matt and Duff having to figure out their parts on their own [Detroit Free Press, December 22, 1994].

In early 1995, Slash would talk more about how it went down:

There's a funny story to 'Sympathy...'. When the movie came out (in the US) a couple of months ago, Geffen called and said, 'Could you do us a favour?'. That movie coming out was a big issue for me, because the books (The Vampire Trilogy by Anne Rice) were great. They have a real kind of passion in there — a sort of dark romanticism — and I'm a real heavy-duty, old-time vampire horror movie freak. And it was like Tom Cruise AND Brad Pitt. No f**king way! So I got this call saying would we do 'Sympathy For The Devil' for the movie.

I thought, 'Well okay, maybe it will be a vehicle to get the band back together and get the wheels in motion for some pre-production stuff. So I went to the screening in one of those stiff theatres full of showbiz f**king suits, and I'm half asleep! I'm not having a good time, and I couldn't just get up and leave, so I was trying to be cool.

I started smoking cigarettes, which is not something you're meant to do in an LA cinema... it's like murder! So I got up and left before the lights went out. I have to say Tom Cruise did the best he could, but the film's laughable to me. The Stones' version of the song was playing in the screening in the same place ours was meant to be.

Anyway, I got up and went home. I called Doug [Goldstein] and said, 'Leave it: the Stones version's fine! There's no need to do a song that doesn't need to be redone!'.

Then Axl went to see the film the next day, and it's inevitable that he likes it and comes out of the movie completely at odds with me! It just goes with the territory — I love this singer/lead guitarist relationship in bands... it's just f**king stupid!

So Axl went and saw it and said he loved it. He was ecstatic. 'Let's do the song!' he says. So I said, 'Okay'. We show up at the studio... who shows up? Matt, Duff and I. That was it.

While we were doing it, we literally had to write down how many bars each section was, because without vocals you don't know where the next change is going to come. But we got it done and the guitar solos on and everything […].

We were supposed – I figured we would all show up, and Duff and Matt and I showed up. So we were sort of like to brick layers, we got the music down, then Axl showed up a couple of days later with his entourage.

[Recording 'Sympathy'] didn't do what I was hoping it would do – let's just leave it at that. When it came down to it, there was only three of us there together and then Axl did his part on his own.

Tom Zutaut called up and asked for a favor, and he said, “Would you do Sympathy For The Devil for David Geffen’s movie?” I talked to Axl about it and Axl said, “No, I don’t wanna do it.” And I said, “I’m gonna see the movie” - you know, see a screening. I saw the screening and I was bored to tears; one of the worst vampire movies I’ve ever seen, actually, and I can say that without feeling bad about it, because I love vampires and horror movies, and all that. So I went home and I said, “Nah, the Stones version” – it was already in the movie – “is fine. Just leave it.” And then Axl went to see it and loved it. So it was like, “Okay, no problem.” He said, “Let’s do the song” and so I said, “Fine.” I thought this could be a good vehicle to get Guns N’ Roses in one room and get the wheels turning for a new record. The only thing is, Matt and Duff and me were the only ones that showed up, and Axl took a few days.


And when Axl came in to lay down his vocals, he brought Paul Huge with him who laid down his own guitar track on the song, to compliment Slash's.

Then Axl went on to go do the vocals, and he brought another guitar player with him. It was a guy that’s from Indiana, who I can’t stand; and he sort of added a little rhythm guitar there. They also put little answers on my guitar solo, my first one – there’s two solos in the song. The first one, if you listen to it, you’ll hear my guitar, and then there’s little teeny little thing in the background; so that fucked me off. As a result, we ended up doing another cover song, of a song that didn’t need to be covered, for a lame movie and it didn’t do anything for the band. So it was an effort made, but an effort that was wasted, too.
The O-Zone, February 1995


Slash would discover that Axl had invited Paul Huge in to lay down guitar tracks when 'Sympathy' was being mixed, on October 31, 1994. This caused a severe rift between Slash and Axl [see later chapter].

Although the song would not be released until December 1994, radio stations would already be playing advance copies and Geffen would claim to not know who actually played on the song, except that it was "Guns N' Roses" [Detroit Free Press, November 25, 1994].


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Post by Soulmonster on Mon Sep 02, 2019 11:17 am

NOVEMBER 1994 - UZI SUICIDE IS RESURRECTED


In November 1994 Axl would be reported to intend to revive the label Uzi Suicide which Guns N' Roses had used to launch their first EP back in 1986 [Kerrang! November 4, 1994; RAW Magazine, November 1994]. With distribution lined up via Geffen, Axl organized a showcase gig for Geffen executives on October featuring four of the bands he was interested in: Soul, Davy's Farm, Salt Of The Earth and The Assassins [RAW Magazine, November 1994].

The Assassins featured Axl's brother Stuart Bailey on guitar. Bailey was previously best-known as a vocalist with Dr. Whiskey. The Assassins' music, which Bailey has a hand in writing, is in the currently hot Southern Rock vein being pursued by the likes of Pride & Glory and Blind Melon [RAW Magazine, November 1994].

Uzi Suicide obtained the rights to Hanoi Rocks' back catalogue in 1990 [Kerrang! November 5, 1994] and re-released it all in the US in 1993 [RAW Magazine, November 1994].

In January 1995, Axl would be said to devote his time looking for new bands to sign to Uzi Suicide while Slash was occupied with Snakepit [Kerrang! January 14, 1995].


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Post by Soulmonster on Mon Sep 02, 2019 2:39 pm

NOVEMBER 1994-JANUARY 1995 - GILBY SAYS HE HAS QUIT GUNS N' ROSES


Despite Slash explicitly stating Gilby was out of the band in June 1994, no official statement was released by Geffen, Gilby would not confirm he was out, and media would continue to speculate that he might still be in the band.

In November, with Gilby being on tour, the rumours were again spreading [Orange County Register, November 25, 1994]. Again, Gilby would still not explicitly state he was out of the band, but indicate that if the band wanted him again he would be there:

The most important thing is that Guns N' Roses won't ever, ever go away. Guns N' Roses is pretty much Axl, Slash and Duff. It's what and when they decide to make an album, the rest of us have to work around that album. Some of the members will change over the years. But as long as Axl, Slash and Duff want to make a record together, it'll continue.

I'm really at their mercy as to when they decide they want to do things. It could be a year, and I just don't think it's very productive to sit around and wait
[Orange County Register, November 25, 1994].
Yet, in late November it would be reported that Gilby was no longer a members of GN'R when he "finally decided this fall that there wasn't a place for him in the band" [Arizona Daily Star, November 25, 1994].

The realization that he was really, undeniably, out of the band probably came with the song 'Sympathy for the Devil' which was recorded in October 1994, recording sessions for which Gilby had not been invited. Although the song would not be released until December 1994, radio stations would already be playing advance copies and Geffen would refuse to answer who played on the song [Detroit Free Press, November 25, 1994].

When Guns N’ Roses did that project for the ‘Interview with the Vampire’ soundtrack, I was no part of it. I didn’t even know about it. I was out doing my tour and didn’t know anything about it[Angus Leader, January 19, 1995].
And in January 1995, Gilby would also finally admit he was out, but spin it like was him who had quit the band [AP/Daily World, January 16, 1995; Argus Leader, January 19, 1995]. Gilby would also state musical differences with Axl as the reason for leaving the band:

Axl Rose has a different vision for the next Guns ’N Roses album and it’s not the kind of music I’m comfortable playing[AP/Daily World, January 16, 1995].
How I feel about it is, Slash and Matt are two of the best friends I’ve had in the world. It was a fun ride. I’m glad I did it, and I really enjoyed it. I wouldn’t replace it for the world. But some of the ideas that Axl has about the band, I don’t feel comfortable with it. It’s to the point, I really don’t care what happens. I’m doing what I want to do and having fun[Argus Leader, January 19, 1995].
What really prompted the decision is that the band has been in limbo for the last year. I just don’t really fit in anymore. […] I’ve spoken to the band many times about how they want the next record to sound. The sound Axl wants is not compatible with the way I play guitar. That’s why I’ve always done my solo work and the record they wanted to do[The Acron Beacon Journal, January 27, 1995].


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Post by Soulmonster on Mon Sep 02, 2019 3:22 pm

SLASH DOES NOT LIKE PAUL HUGE, AT ALL


As stated by Slash, one of the guitarists brought in to potentially replace Gilby when he as fired in June 1994, was Paul Huge, Axl's friend from Indiana. Later on, after Slash, Duff and Matt had recorded their parts for 'Sympathy for the Devil' in September or October 1994, Axl came in to lay down his vocals and brought along Paul again.

[Axl] brought with him a guitar player from Indiana he used to hang with, and that helped ruin what I thought was going to be a cool version of the song. In other words, it didn’t provide any vehicle for getting the band back together.

And then there was another guitar player that Axl wanted to use which I didn't like, I didn't like him. And Axl turned around and put him on the record as well and I was pretty pissed off about that. He is answering my guitar solos with his guitar solos. It sounds really bad but... whatever.

[…] then Axl went in to do vocals... and the next thing you know, there's this 'answer' guitar going on during my guitar solo! It's Paul Huge!

I will probably never forgive Axl for that. But we've talked about it. We made a deal that if Paul ever plays on anything, then I should at least be told first, because it really took me off guard. I wasn't there when he did it.

Axl likes the song. I haven't listened to it since it was mixed. It's not like it was lousy guitar playing or anything; I think it's how it went down. If people like it, then fine. I haven't gone to see the movie again because I don't think I could bear it.

That's one of the biggest, most personal things that Axl and I have gone through. It really pissed me off that he brought in an outside guitar player without ever telling me.

I told Axl I refuse to play with this guy. That’s where a lot of the so-called fighting rumors that you’ve heard - which are blown way out of proportion - came from.


Media would report on Paul replacing Gilby and compliment the Paul's guitar playing, likely to Slash's frustrations:

Huge, Clarke's (temporary?) replacement, is an unheard of musician who has known Axl Rose from the years when the pair lived in Indiana. Axl is thought to be keen for Huge to combine with GN'R on a permanent basis, following a spate of successful rehearsals and the new man's tasty playing on 'Sympathy...', where his guitar lines twist together perfectly with Slash's.


The following quote would also indicate that Slash's dislike of Paul went beyond the fact that he had been included on 'Sympathy' without Slash's knowledge or consultation, but stemmed from when they first met and played together after Gilby had been fired:

I never liked that guy from day one.


And in January 1995, when referring to the band's effort to replace Gilby Slash would refer to Paul as "that idiot" [Much Music, January 1995].

I hate that guy. That’s Paul. That’s a whole another story. […] Paul is just a friend of Axl’s, and he brought Paul in without telling me. And I got really angry, cuz the main thing is the band, you know, and getting the band together. So it’s not like you hire a bunch of session people and make Guns N’ Roses. It doesn’t work that way.


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Post by Soulmonster on Mon Sep 02, 2019 6:27 pm

JANUARY 1995 - GOLDSTEIN IS OUT?


Rumours were flourishing and one was that Goldstein considered managing The Stone Roses and quitting Guns N' Roses [Kerrang! January 14, 1995].


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Post by Soulmonster on Wed Sep 04, 2019 3:13 pm

JANUARY 1995
TRYING TO REPLACE GILBY, ZAKK WYLDE IS CONSIDERED


Zakk Wylde could have been one of the potential replacements for Gilby who played with the band in June/July 1994. Slash had previously expressed admiration for Wylde's playing:

Zakk Wylde is cool.


The band's involvement with Wylde happened in mid-January 1995 [RAW, March 1, 1995].

We did that thing in Wembley, me and Slash, that Night Of 100 Guitars, and just recently Pride & Glory played the Troubadour in LA and Slash came and jammed there. So then the guys asked me if I wanted to come down and jam with them, get some tunes together, and I said, `Yeah, cool, man'!


More specifically, it was Axl who invited Wylde [RAW, March 1, 1995]:

Yeah - [Axl] said, `Dude, why don't you come and write some songs and we'll see what happens. If it works out, great, it'd be a blast'. He just said, `Hey, maybe we'll be in a band together!'. So we jammed together for just over a week, we jammed over a whole bunch of shit and came out with three pretty cool ideas. That was with the whole band: Axl, Slash, Dizzy, Duff, Matt and me. We were all just jammin' together and havin' a blast.

When I talked with Axl I said it'd be way cool that Slash and I could do harmonies together, crazy shit that'd be fun to play, and the whole band ended up jammin'.

When I was asked about jammin' with the guys, I thought it'd be way cool because I love the band, I think they're great. And I love Slash as a guitarist, I really love listening to his guitar playing - him and (Alice In Chains star) Jerry Cantrell are my peers that I dig listening to.

[Axl] wasn't all, 'Financially, this would be a great move if the band does this and that...'. He just said 'I wanna play some f**kin' tunes and I like the shit you did with Ozzy. It'd be great to get together and jam with the guys'. And it was great.

Bottom line, [Axl]'s just a normal dude to me. Shit maybe happened in the past because things haven't been going great. He has downs, he wants to kick ass and gets pissed if something isn't right.

It wasn't like he's this 'weirdo', and the bottom line is that if someone gave me a weirdo head-case trip - and I wouldn't care if it was Robert Plant! - I'd tell 'em to go f**k themselves. I need that like a hole in the head.

Axl isn't like that. He just wants to jam and he told me he's bored as f**k and wants to jam.


Wylde was not sure if anything would come out of this one week of jamming:

That's where it pretty much stands right now-things are up in the air. I mean, I have crazy shit happening with my stuff. I'm also doing my work with Oz and there's no telling what will happen in the future. I think the guys in Guns are f**kin' awesome, and hangin' with Axl when I have, we've had a f**kin' great time talkin' and jammin'.

[Axl] said it sounded f**kin' killer. He's got a batch of good ideas, piano things that sound really cool. I have a bunch and I look forward to jammin' some more, seeing if they work out.

But it's all up in the air right now, I ain't a member of Guns N' Roses. Who knows what'll happen, but if the guys say after a record that it would be great if I'd do the tour then that'd be great, but who knows?


And discussing what the music sounded like:

A mixture of both [Metal and more Southern sounding], really. The stuff we've been dicking around with is just heavy hardcore stuff with the whole band jamming it. But I'm having a good time, and I'll tell ya, the only thing that'd stop me from doin' the Oz record, my own thing and jammin' with Guns is if I was a lazy asshole who watched TV and drunk beer all f**kin' day!


Interestingly, in early 1995 it would also be speculated that Axl considered Wylde a potential replacement for Slash, but that Wylde was not interested in it [Kerrang! January 14, 1995].

Slash would also cool the rumours about Wylde joining the band, saying it had been just a "buddy thing":

And then we jammed with Zakk. But Zakk’s, like – he’s a good friend, so he’d just been jamming. We haven’t made some sort of finalized decision as to who’s gonna be the new guitar player. […] [Wylde]’s in Ozzy right now, as as far as his relationship with Guns in concerned, it’s sort of like – it’s more like a buddy thing, where we’re just hanging and sort of jamming some stuff, so...


And later Slash would go in more detail about why it hadn't worked out:

Zakk is just a good friend we jammed with, because now that Gilby is not in the band, Axl was like, “What about Zakk? You like Zakk, right?” And I was like, “Yeah.” But we don’t sound right. It doesn’t sound right with, like, two heavy lead guitar players. There’s no, like, the off – usually Guns N’ Roses uses an off rhythm and a main lead sort of riff. So now me and Zakk just play the same thing; but that’s just because we’re both lead guitar players. So as much as I love Zakk, we haven’t made any decision. I told Axl I’m gonna be gone till August touring with Snakepit, and we’ll talk about it when I get back.


A little bit later he would indicate that Wylde may be a member of the band and that he had a problem with that:

If Zakk’s (Wylde) gonna be in the band, that’s an issue which ... we were just jamming. There was never any decision when I left to do this. When I said, 'I’ll be back in August,’ we hadn't come to any definitive decision as to who was gonna be the rhythm guitarist. I love Zakk. He’s a lot of fun, but we don’t sound like Guns N’ Roses with two lead Heavy Metal guitar players. It just sounds different. But if that’s supposed to be the case when I get back, we’ll talk about it, so I have no idea where it stands right now.


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Post by Soulmonster on Wed Sep 04, 2019 3:14 pm

MUSICAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN AXL AND SLASH


After Axl having rejected the material Slash had worked on in early 1994, there were further indications they didn't see eye to eye on the musical direction of the band.

Axl was on a different trip, where he wanted to sound like Pearl Jam, last I heard, with keyboards, and heavy-duty epic videos. That was all really tedious for me, [Snakepit] kept me sane.

Right now there seems to be a fucking confusion about what "a good Guns-record" is.

There are some things that need to be sorted out. Axl wants Guns to do a lot of ballads and stuff, and I want to do rock stuff. I don't care about the current musical climate or what is commercially viable. […] I'm just a street-level guy, and I don't fucking live on the beach in Malibu. And I'm not gonna conform to any of that shit either.


Axl had from an early stage discussed how he wanted Guns N' Roses to expand into different musical genres and obviously felt that the next record should be different to what they had released so far. Despite playing with many different bands and artists, when it came to the music he wrote himself, Slash was less adventurous, and when asked why his Snakepit record wasn't more diverse in styles, would reply:

When it comes to writing, I don't have any interest in rap or punk.


Slash would also open up about some of the music of Guns N' Roses not being his cup of tea:

There's some material that Guns does that I don't like. But as a band we all work together. There are some aspects of Guns that I'm not too thrilled about, so this [=Snakepit] was a chance for me to do a simple, off-the-wall-it-doesn't-matter record, ha, ha.


When asked if Axl plans to do a solo record, Slash would quip:

Axl thinks that Guns is his solo-project.

Axl has gotten very into a lot of stuff (musically) that I don't necessarily relate to, but we still work together on it. It's like we've expanded into different realms.

Guns is in no hurry to rush out the next record to keep up with current trends. I wouldn't want to sacrifice what Guns does naturally to try and keep up with the generational changes in music that happen really quickly. […] I'm not gonna sacrifice what I do to try and keep up with, say, the Seattle scene. It's not like I have any new rap material coming out.

My traditional values – as far as Guns is concerned or just in general, having to do with integrity and music sense and so forth – haven't changed. Everybody grows in their own way and when we all get together in a room, we know each other very well... but you want to get to where there's a meeting of the minds. And it's like pulling teeth actually to do that. But the guys in the band and I call ourselves the "bricklayers", the guys who really do a lot of hands-on work. And then there's the lead singer who has a whole other vision of his own. You just have to deal with it. You can't, like, stress out – I have no intentions of quitting the band or anything like that – and the only reason I'm doing a solo project is just to sort of get away from that for a while because Guns doesn't have to record now or next year. They can do a record whenever.


The differences between the two didn't only come down to musical direction:

Axl is – like I said, Axl is Axl. You gotta know the man before you can really pass judgement on the guy. The reason I’m not working with Axl at the moment, is only because he wants to do what he wants to do, and I want to do what I want to do; which, mine, is a more simplified just sort of a rock ‘n’ roll thing, where he’s got visions of videos and blah blah blah.


Again would Slash say that Axl considered Guns N' Roses his solo project:

He [Axl] was supposed to do a solo record at one time, but he thinks Guns N’ Roses as a solo record for him; and, unfortunately, it’s not really that way. So we need to sit down and talk about it. But we’ve come to an agreement, where, you know, it’s very amicable what’s going on at the moment – as far as I know, last I talked to him..



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Post by Soulmonster on Thu Sep 05, 2019 12:22 pm

JANUARY 1995
THERE IS NO NEW MUSIC


In early 1995, Slash would tell Kerrang! that despite what had been said earlier about there being songs on tape, everything that he had made after the last touring, was either meant for Snakepit or ended up on their pinball machine (Ain't Going Down) [Kerrang! January 14, 1995].

Other than that, Use Your Illusion is the last piece of original material, and that's three years ago.


With Axl and Slash in disagreement over the musical direction of the band, and angry at each other for various reasons, Slash went on tour with Snakepit.

Once the record was finished, and it came out really good, I thought, 'I might as well tour on it 'cause Guns isn't doing anything.' I'm gonna start touring in March and we're gonna do fucking clubs, man.


The plan was now to reconvene as soon as Slash was finished touring for Snakepit, and "if everything's okay, then I'd love to continue doing [Guns N' Roses]" [Kerrang! January 14, 1995].

We are going to meet in August after we've toured with Snakepit. Then we'll see what happens. We've been jamming a bit, but there isn't any actual songs.

Whenever I have a few days off from Snakepit, we rehearse and write songs. After I'm done touring, which won't be long, we'll start really formulating the basis for an album. Then record, then figure out a touring situation.


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Post by Soulmonster on Thu Sep 05, 2019 1:47 pm

1995 - IS SLASH OUT OF THE BAND?


DRAFT: In early 1995, rumours swirled that Axl had considered replacing Slash with Zakk Wylde. Slash was just to embark on a tour promoting his own Snakepit album and Slash and Axl did not see eye-to-eye on what the next album would be like. Could it be that Axl had already ended the musical relationship? Slash would repeatedly throughout 1995 say that GN'R was not on his mind, and that he would think about the band when he had finished touring with Snakepit in August 1995 [Aftonbladet, February 4, 1995]. This is similar to what Gilby would say in the second half of 1994, after he had in reality been fired from the band.


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Post by Soulmonster on Fri Sep 06, 2019 1:28 pm

GILBY AFTER GUNS N' ROSES


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Post by Soulmonster on Sun Sep 08, 2019 11:04 am

JANUARY-FEBRUARY 1995
SLASH LETS IT ALL OUT AND GOES TOURING


In early 1995, Slash would talk about Axl:

Axl is in such a funny place, you know, because Axl is Axl, and no one will ever really understand him as much as he would probably like to be understood. So he really is on his own in that respect. But I've known him long enough where there's a certain amount of leeway with his outbursts that I can handle. They just don't affect me. […] But I feel sorry for him sometimes, if only because he's such a tough act to be: to maintain any kind of dignity with this public scrutiny and having all this negative press and so on...


When asked if it isn't natural that Axl would be pissed when Slash made a new band featuring Matt and Gilby, after Gilby had been sacked from Guns N' Roses, Slash responded:

The Gilby thing did piss Axl off. But Gilby was pissed off too. He was shocked when he was fired, because there was no other reason behind it other than Axl had made up his mind. And of course I had to be the f**king messenger of bad news, which was f**ked for me because Gilby and I are really close. You don't play with people like that.

I hooked up with Gilby and rightly so, because Gilby didn't deserve that kind of treatment — especially when he covered our ass so we could complete the world tour when Izzy quit. I wasn't mad at Gilby. I can do what the f**k I want! And if he wanted to work with me after all of this shit...

We (Slash and Axl) just had a really rare, heated conversation a couple of days ago, where everything that I've had brewing — you know how quiet and laid-back I am — I just let everything out. He sort of listened to me. I said everything I could possibly say that I didn't agree with. So that's about it.


A few weeks after Kerrang! published an interview where Slash would mention having fought with Axl just a few days prior, The Gazette published an interview where he would claim to not fight with Axl at the moment:

We’re fine now. We're not fighting.


And he would reiterate that everything's good between them at another interview in January:

Everything’s fine, yeah. Relax.


Yet in February Slash would admit that there was some friction between him and Axl due to Slash going on tour at a time when Axl wants to work on new music:

The band is still together. There's a little bit of congestion going on, because I'm going on tour and Axl wants to do a Guns record right this second. Unfortunately, I can't back down from my situation because I have to drop the ball. It's too late for that. So there's a little conflict, but no one's quit and no one's been fired or anything like that. It's sort of dormant, and we just have to wait and see what happens.


As for writing when Slash comes back from touring with Snakepit:

I’m sorta hoping that Axl might start writing some material and for once have something for me to go and play as opposed to me having to initiate it all the time. It’s sorta like sex.


And when asked if this doesn't mean a new record is far away:

Not necessarily. The only thing I know at this point is that I'm gonna take the 'Snakepit' thing on the road in March. We'll be touring till summer and then we're off. What happens then I don't know.


In early February Slash would say he hadn't seen Axl since October 31, 1994, while "doing" 'Sympathy for the Devil' [The Howard Stern Show, February 1 1995].

And whether Axl is doing okay:

The only thing he’s got going that’s a pain in the ass for him right now is the whole Stephanie Seymour lawsuit.

I defend [Axl] within reason. A lot of the stuff, like going on (stage) late and causing riots, it's just 'cause Axl's real explosive. There's things I don't forgive him for, but because I've known him for so long, I understand him. I don't judge him. That's why I feel that if you don't know the guy, just shut up.


When asked if he had quit the band, Slash would indicate that he didn't get along with someone in the band but that he, Slash, would not quit over this:

Guns is fine. I learned from other people’s mistakes to not get so egotistical or so self-involved that you quit your band because you can’t get along with one of the other guys in the band. […] I’ll be the lead guitar player [on the next record], yeah. Unless I’m fired (laughs).


A little while later he would again reiterate he hadn't quit but that Zakk Wylde might be in the band and that he would have an issue with that:

I mean: is Guns still together? Yes it is. Is Axl in the band? As far as I know. Am I still in the band? I don’t know. (He shrugs) No, I haven’t quit. If Zakk’s (Wylde) gonna be in the band, that’s an issue which ... we were just jamming. There was never any decision when I left to do this. When I said, 'I’ll be back in August,’ we hadn't come to any definitive decision as to who was gonna be the rhythm guitarist. I love Zakk. He’s a lot of fun, but we don’t sound like Guns N’ Roses with two lead Heavy Metal guitar players. It just sounds different. But if that’s supposed to be the case when I get back, we’ll talk about it, so I have no idea where it stands right now.


Before going on his own tour, Slash had a rehearsal with GN'R with Axl present. This was likely in early February 1995 [Raw, March 1, 1995].


Last edited by Soulmonster on Sat Sep 21, 2019 10:00 pm; edited 8 times in total
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Post by Soulmonster on Mon Sep 16, 2019 7:29 pm

GROWING AS MUSICIANS


It may not sound like it, but I think I have more of a grasp of where the notes I want to hit are. You know, on the Lies album there's all that punk stuff on the second side that was very spontaneous. When you're playing fast and you want to go somewhere and you hear it in your head, you have to be able to get there that quickly. It almost has to be instantaneous – from here to there. And so I think I'm better at that. I don't have any more technical knowledge now than I did in the old days. I really don't practise. I hang out with Steve Lukather a lot and I always used to think he was one of those technical, no-feel guitar players – but Luke played me his solo record at my house (Mr Candyman) when he came back from the studio one night and he'd done four or five songs that were all first takes. It was amazing. He incorporated feel with technical stuff too – I mean, you hear me and it's pentatonic forever! And maybe some minor stuff because I don't know what I'm doing.
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Post by Soulmonster on Tue Sep 17, 2019 1:51 pm

1995
PERSONAL LIVES


[Renee]'s pissed off at me now because this is all I do, and then I go out with my friends. She doesn't keep the same kind of crowd that I do, so we usually don't go out together. I'm hanging out with Matt. We're fine, but she's pissed off at me because I didn't come home until 6:30 yesterday morning! It's no big deal. She knows who she married and she deals with it.
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Post by Soulmonster on Tue Sep 17, 2019 6:13 pm

1995
DUFF RESURRECTS 'TEN MINUTE WARNING'


With rumours flying about the band being in the process of disintegrating, Duff would return to Seattle to start up again his old band, Ten Minute Warning. In February 1995, Slash would be asked what this meant:

I know he went up to Seattle a while ago and played around with this old band of his or whatever, but it was nothing serious. Right now he's out in the country riding his bike, ha ha.
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