APPETITE FOR DISCUSSION
Welcome to Appetite for Discussion -- a Guns N' Roses fan forum!

Please feel free to look around the forum as a guest, I hope you will find something of interest. If you want to join the discussions or contribute in other ways then you need to become a member. Registering is free and easy.

Cheers!
SoulMonster

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Page 2 of 8 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next

Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 13:57

THE FALLOUT WITH VICKY HAMILTON


Despite all the good work Vicky Hamilton did for the band, she did not have a written contract with them. After a meeting with Peter Paterno, a music attorney she knew, she was handed a contract to give to the band. She told the band that they either had to negotiate and sign the agreement, or move out of her apartment. When this didn't produce results, she took them all to Paterno's office to negotiate the deal. After the meeting Paterno told Hamilton that he would handle the legalities of working out a record deal for the band and that she should get another lawyer to represent her on the management agreement [Vicky Hamilton, "Appetite For Dysfunction", 2014, p. 136-137]. hamilton would claim to have borrowed $25,000 to help finance the band [Vicky Hamilton, "Appetite For Dysfunction", 2014, p. 147].

in February/March 1986, Hamilton had a talk with Axl:

[...] Axl had invited me to the Rainbow and bought me dinner. He said he really needed to talk with me. After the first two rounds of drinks, he said to me, "I really appreciate all you have done for the band and I really intend to pay you back, and give you a bonus on top of that, but I am not sure that you will be our manager once we sign a deal. You are really great on a local level, but I don't know if you have what it takes to take us to the top, to worldwide success."

My feelings were hurt, but I said, "What if I got a big time management partner?" Axl said, "Maybe... Who would you go to?" "What about Doug Thaler and Doc McGhee?" McGhee Entertainment already had Mötley Crüe, Bon Jovi and the Scorpions. "That might work," Axl said
[Vicky Hamilton, "Appetite For Dysfunction", 2014, p. 148].
Hamilton then set up a meeting with McGhee and Thaler, but the band was strung out and tired after partying the night before, even to the extent of falling asleep during the meeting, and McGhee and Thaler declined to co-manage them [Vicky Hamilton, "Appetite For Dysfunction", 2014, p. 149].

So Hamilton was negotiating a management deal with the band while they were negotiating a record deal with Geffen Records.

Tom Zutaut from Geffen Records eventually contacted Hamilton and said he would give her a scout job at Geffen if she would help him get the band signed to them. Zutaut would then get the band a big-time manager. She agreed to this and at the same time Axl had decided to sign with Geffen. Peter Paterno looked over the deal memo and the band was signed on March 26, 1986 [Vicky Hamilton, "Appetite For Dysfunction", 2014, p. 149-150]. This ended Hamilton's attempts at becoming the band's manager.

On April 1, which was my birthday, Axl and Robert John had brought me a glass pipe and got me some strong pot. Beyond the offer to pay for a tattoo, which I declined, the pot was about all I got from GN'R for all the work I had done for them - and I still owed Howie twenty-five thousand dollars[Vicky Hamilton, "Appetite For Dysfunction", 2014, p. 151].
The band would later insist they didn't have a manager in this period, and negotiated the deal with Geffen Records themselves [RIP Magazine, May 1987]. This was made abundantly clear in Axl's response to the Music Connection interview from April 1986, which is believed to have been published in August 1986:

Vicki Hamilton is a kind, good-hearted person. There is a sizeable list of tasks performed and duties completed by Vicki, none of which have been unappreciated. Vicki is exceptional in booking, promoting and as she says herself, babysitting a band. Without her the road would have been considerably rougher. Vicki, however, did not negotiate our record deal, plan or design band direction, or choose personnel in the Guns N' Roses organization[Music Connection, August 1986].
It is true they didn't have an official manager, nothing management contract was signed, but it is undeniable that Hamilton helped them out a lot. This is clear from Steven's biography where he states that Hamilton was managing the band at the time and that she had a lawyer look over the paperwork [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 105].

It is interesting how Duff barely mentions Hamilton's name in his biography, while Steven describes her as instrumental in very important events in the band's history.

The reason why the band never signed a management agreement with Hamilton could be that Raz had warned them against having a manager at the time when negotiating with their label:

With Christmas [1985] coming up, the guys held a band meeting to decide on which manager to hire, so that everything would be in place once business got cranked back up in the coming year. Me, Joe [Raz' brother], and Robert John crammed into studio B as the band discussed amongst themselves various pros and cons of each managerial candidate. When someone asked me who I liked, I said, "If you sign with a manager, you'll owe them part of your entire record deal."

Izzy perked up, "Say that again, Raz."

I said, "If you guys sign with a manager and get a record deal the very next day, you'll owe that manager their percentage of the entire deal, even if you fire them before the ink dries on your recording contract." I added, "If all these vultures are circling, it means that everyone knows you're going to get a deal soon, with or without their help."

The guys chewed on that info for a few minutes and ultimately decided their interests would be better served if they sought legal advice before signing any contracts
[Raz Cue, "The Days of Guns, & Raz's", 2015, p. 231].
Hamilton was out of the picture as per her agreement with Zutaut, something that was unknown to Steven:

All of a sudden, out of the blue, Vicki was no longer around. It just happened. At first I thought she had cut some severance package deal with Geffen and that was why she just dropped out of sight. I had heard no talk about tossing her aside when we got signed. I believe that she still had some tricks up her sleeve and would still have plenty to contribute to our success.[...]

I guess the band as a whole felt she was not established enough, and in fact, a general feeling surfaced that a man would have more power. This was particularly true for Axl, who believed a woman would not get the same kind of respect as a man. Alan was a cool guy and never uttered a negative word about Vicki. [...] I kind of made a mental note to find out the details of Vicki's departure, but in the swirl of getting the live record out, I never really followed up on it
[Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 110]
In April, 1987, it is hinted that the band was in "legal wrangles with former managers" [Sounds Magazine, 1987.04.04], and in May 1987 it is said that the band had gone through "ump­teen different managers" [RIP Magazine, May 1987]. By August 1988, it is reported that Hamilton had sued the band [Screamer Magazine, August 1988] for $10,000 [Musician, December 1988], so it is reasonable to think this explains some of the "legal wrangles" mentioned in April 1987. By November 1988, it is reported that the suit was settled out of court [Rolling Stone, November 1988]. In 1989, Axl would also mention that they've had to pay some "out-of-court settlements" [RIP, April 1989], the settlement with Hamilton is likely one of them.

In December 1988 Musician Magazine published an interview featuring Hamilton. In her biography she would claim she was "still pretty angry about what had happen between the band and me, I didn't hold anything back. All of it was true, but for some reason, Axl didn't like the fact that I had told my side of the story to the writer. He left me a threating [sic] message on my answering machine, 'You better watch what you say bitch, as I always get what I want and right now I want to bury your ass'" [Vicky Hamilton, "Appetite For Dysfunction", 2014, p. 209].

This is what was printed in Musician Magazine:

Axl won't talk to me. Why? Maybe because I sued them, but I gave up trying to figure him out years ago. There are times when he's the sweetest boy you could know, but when he gets mad, he's like a top spinning off. He's not consistently evil. And he's not consistently nice either. It's two personalities. That's what's so scary. But you're talking about street creatures. They had never had any money before and suddenly it was like, 'Life's a party now.' The day they signed I was crying because I knew what was lying ahead [Musician, December 1988]
It is likely that Axl's anger at Hamilton stemmed not only from what she said in this interview, but also from the fact that she had sued the band. In her biography she implies to have sued the band in early 1986, when the three-year statue of limitation was about to close, but as demonstrated by the above quotes, this can't be true. She also states that she sued them for $1,000,000 but settled and received $35,000.

Slash would later look back at this period and mention "creeps" who wanted to manage the band but that they managed "to get through that and through a couple of band management situations" [Scene Magazine, April 1988].

Axl would comment on this again in April 1989, likely after having read Hamilton's comments Musician in December 1988:

Vicky Hamilton was a woman who basically had a monopoly on booking bands at the Roxy and the Whiskey, and we needed to get those gigs. We also needed a place to live. Vicky offered us help. She said she'd get us $25,000 we desperately needed for the proper equipment to start getting close to the sound we wanted. She never came through with the money; so with an important gig coming up, we got Geffen to go for a $35,000 memo deal, which means that we didn't have to sign with them but we had to pay the money back. Now Vicky's claiming that she managed us and that we wouldn't pay her back. She claims she invested $100,000 and she should be party to any of the money we make. She says we all get along, but in reality nobody likes dealing with her. Nobody trusts her. She managed the band? We - Slash, Duff, Izzy, Steven and Axl - managed the band. A year later she sued us for one million dollars. We didn't want to go to court, pay lawyer fees, court expenses and shit, especially when I don't trust the law and judicial system. I don't need the hassle. I don't believe in the fuckin' law system. I don't believe in the fuckin' government. I do believe that America is the best country on the face of the fuckin' earth, but that doesn't mean that America isn't run by assholes. Poor Vicky might look great in front of a judge, and Guns N' Roses look like slime, so they should lose. We settled out of court for $30,000, 15 of which Geffen paid [RIP, April 1989]
Izzy would also look back at the period with Hamilton:

We never signed any contract, she got places to hire us to perform, in the Roxy and other places like that. She was doing things for us and we were going to work for her. Some of the things she said she would do never happened, so we just stopped working for her. She ended up suing us. […] She took thirty or forty grand, I don’t remember. I remember the moment she sued us, I asked myself “Why are you suing us?” I couldn’t believe it. America is like that, lots of people sue each other, it’s horrible, man. In Amsterdam, the other day, I saw how a boy on a bike was hit by a motorcyclist, the cyclist got up and when the biker asked how he was doing, the boy told him that he was fine and not to worry. End of story. In America, the biker would’ve began to rant: “Man, I’m going to notify my lawyer, oh! I can’t walk, fuck, my neck hurts, fuck, shit” [Popular 1, November 1992].


Last edited by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 14:04; edited 3 times in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 13:59

MARCH 1986 - 'FARGIN BASTYDGES'

After having reopened the Whisky A Go Go on April 5 [see previous section] the band kept a low profile. They did an acoustic show on May 1 at the Central, playing 'Move to the City', 'Don't Cry' and 'Mama Kin'.

Geffen demanded that the band stopped playing live shows to build on the mystique.

And then [Geffen] gave us some allowance money and stuck us in an apartment and said 'Don't play anywhere. Don't do any thing until...', and that lasted for almost a year, before we ever did anything [VOX, January 1991].
To get around Geffen's playing ban, the band started doing shows under the name 'Fargin Bastydges'. The setlist and everything else was just as with a normal Guns N' Roses show. The first of these shows took place at Raji's on May 13. before this show, Paul Stanley from Kiss met with the band:

"Izzy was unconscious, with drool coming out of the side of his mouth. It wasn’t clear whether he was sleeping or dead—that’s how rough he looked. Duff and Steven were very nice, and Steven was just flowing about what a big KISS fan he was. I didn’t realize that the half-comatose, curly-headed lead guitar player who called himself Slash was what had become of the sweet kid I’d spoken to during the interviews before the recording of Creatures a few years earlier. Then Axl chatted with me and played a few songs on a crappy cassette player they had lying around. […] When he played ‘Nightrain’ I thought it was really good, but I told him that maybe the chorus could be used a pre-chorus instead, and there could be another chorus added afterwards. That was the last time he ever spoke to me. Ever. […] Slash roused himself, and he and I started talking about the Stones. I show him Keith’s five-string open-G tuning, which was the set-up Keith used to write all his stuff. I took a string off and retuned a guitar, and he thought it was very cool. I also offered to help Slash get in touch with people who could hook him up with some free guitars—we were sponsored by all sorts of instrument companies, and I figured a young guy like him could use some help getting equipment to record with" [Paul Stanley's biography].

Raji's was a total dive, probably a twenty-by-twenty foot room that reeked of beer and piss with a PA that sounded like an outdated console permanently in the red. The stage was a foot high, packed against the farthest wall from the door; the bathrooms were more disgusting than CBGB's [...] That show was fucking amazing: it was dirty, muddy, shoddy, and teetering on chaos as Guns ever was in my mind. It was as honest and true as Guns N' Roses ever got, because I did a big hit of smack before we went on, which, mixed with the liquor I had already been drinking, made my stomach so rotten that I'd turn around and blow chunks over the back of my amps every five minutes. I had a new guitar tech, Jason, who had to keep jumping out of the way to avoid getting coated. The overwhelming heat in there didn't help the situation much. That show was so rambunctious, the audience so full of unruly diehards, that Axl ended up getting into a fight with some guy in the front row - he might have smashed him in the head with the base of his mike stand. The whole show was a fucking riot; there was so much energy packed into that tiny little overheated box of a room. It was fucking awesome. There's a picture of that gig on the inside sleeve of Appetite for Destruction [Slash's autobiography, p 144-145].
The original way 'You're Crazy' was written was without the curse words. THEY didn't come in until it came on full electric, in front of a crowd with some girl trying to hit me with a beer bottle, and I started directing the words directly at her. That's where the curses happened. I stamped her head with the bottom of my mic stand, and she kept coming at me! I didn't even know her -- nobody in the band knew her. She hit Duff with a beer bottle.

It was at Raji's, Paul Stanley was there as well as the Geffen people. The stage is only like six inches off the ground and the crowd stands right up against you. You only have like eight inches to breathe. This girl is trying to kill me and I didn't even know who she was. Her boyfriend was in another band and he thought I was God, she thought I was God, she was just on bad drugs or something.

It was really weird cause her boyfriend was shaking my hand backstage going, 'man, you're the greatest,' and I was trying to be nice but I could never shake this guy. He was there when I first came in, he was there at the side of the stage, but he must not have been looking when I hit his girlfriend with the mic stand. All of a sudden he goes, 'Wait, you hit my girlfriend? I'm gonna kill you!' And that was it, I started tearing him to shreds. Robert, our photographer, jumped in the way, fell down, I went to kick the guy and kicked Robert instead. Then the guy got loose, he came at me, Robert jumped in the way again and got kicked in the nuts! He wasn't having a very good time. The guy had grabbed one of Steven's drum stands by then, and the security guard had grabbed me. I had this security guy pinned against the wall, and my hands were filled with the other guy's hair. It was a huge mess
[Rock Scene, April 1988].
We like a lot of local bands, like Jet Boy and Redd Kross. But at the same time we’ll go and get in a fight. I got in a fight with Bob Forrest from Thelonious Monster at Raji’s. They were intoxicated, and I was completely straight and playing, and they were throwing beer bottles at the band. If somebody does that I hit them with the mike stand. I don’t care if my mother came up and started punching me, I’d hit her with the mike stand [Rock Scene, April 1988].
Paul Stanley, who wanted to produce their debut record, would describe the band this way:

"That night, I went to see their gig at Raji’s, a little dive in Hollywood. I thought the song they had played for me were good, but they didn’t prepare me for seeing their band live. Guns N’ Roses were stupendous. I was shocked, given the collection of wastoids I’d seen earlier that afternoon, and I immediately realized I was witnessing true greatness " [Paul Stanley's biography].

The band then played a show at Gazzarri's on May 31.

We saw [Paul Stanley] again not long afterward when we played a showcase that Geffen had set up. Basically, Tom [Zutaut] arranged it because we needed to play a gig, so it was this industry-only, invite-only "concert". It took place at Gazzarri's (today it's the Key Club) [According to Duff's autobiography this actually happened at Raji's on May 13], which was a venue that we'd never, ever played on the circuit because it was totally against everything we stood for. It was so glam and gay that there were radio ads for it where the owner, Bill Gazzarri, proclaimed in his thick East Coast accent, "All my bands got foxy guys in 'em! If they don't got foxy guys, they don't play on my stage." Gazzarri's was where the really plastic glam metal could be found. And we definitely weren't trying to be foxy. [...] Anyway, Paul Stanley attended that show, and he actually bullied the sound engineer into allowing hom to man the soundboard and control the mix. We didn't find out until later, but when we did, I cringed at the thought: Paul Stanley had mixed Guns N' Roses - at Gazzarri's [Slash's autobiography, p 143-144].
Paul Stanley's recollection differs:

"I went to see them perform again at another club, called Gazzarri’s—it later became the Key Club. They weren’t happy with the guy mixing their sound, and Slash asked me out of the blue to help out. Decades later, Slash’s recollections of the night would be faulty at best. He liked to pretend I had dared to meddle with their sound. God forbid this guy from KISS would have anything to do with Guns—I mean, what could be worse than a guy from KISS, of all things? He also recalled that I had a blond trophy wife with me. But I wasn’t married and was in fact there with a short brunette named Holly Knight, who was a songwriter famous for ‘Love Is a Battlefield,” among other hits. There is obviously a reason why defense attorneys never want to put alcoholics or drug addicts on the witness stand." [Paul Stanley's biography].

Just after we got signed, we booked a show at Gazzarri's as the Fargin' Bastarges. We got that name from the movie Johnny Dangerously starring Michael Keaton. The band guys in the movie always talked like that, mangling expressions: "You friggin' iceholes. You fargin' bastage. You cork soaker!" [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 100]
[...] Geffen asked us to stop playing live. [...] The rationale? We had to build mystique by dropping out of sight, putting a premium on our performances. To say we didn't meet eye to eye with this decision is an understatement. We acquiesced at first, though we had some gigs already booked that we honored. Soon, though, we had to figure out ways to play - we just functioned best when we could get onstage regularly. And we got bored. So we began to play a bunch of shows as the Fargin Bastydges to get around the label's injunction. We took the name from a scene in the movie Johnny Dangerously. It was an alias, not an alter ego: the set list and everything else was exactly the same as our normal Guns shows; it just allowed us to avoid fighting with Geffen. One of the shows we played was at Gazzarri's, a venerable Hollywood dive we had always sort of wanted to play - just to say we had - but not the sort of place a band signed to a major label was supposed to play [Duff's autobiography, "It's So Easy", 2011, p. 118-119]


Last edited by Soulmonster on Mon 24 Jun 2019 - 20:51; edited 1 time in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 14:04

FROM RAGS TO RICHES AND BACK AGAIN


With new-found wealth coming from the advance the band received from Geffen, the band could afford a more luxurious life-style, or at least not live in abject poverty like homeless people. They could also afford new tattoos, better equipment, and more drugs and booze. According to Raz, the band also rented a "luxury apartment" on the corner of La Cienega and Fountain [Raz' biography, page 238]. This meant that the band moved out of Vicky Hamilton's apartment for good.

I carried the advance money in my boot ‘cause the bank had lost my records. […] with our advance, I bought equipment, and clothes. We also rented this house, and we partied for a while. Steve ate breakfast at Hamburger Haven for a week. We took cabs. I also took people out to the raddest restaurants I could find. I felt I owed some people things [Concert Shots, May 1986].
Well, what happened is, we got restless. We get signed, they give us a bunch of money, put us in an apartment, we can’t go out and do any gigs – so we fucking got bored, and started doing a lot of drugs, drinking a lot, tearing up houses. We had $7,500 apiece – which was unheard of for us. [...] We used to have to look for drugs, now people force them on us [Spin, May 1988]
We partied hard for about two weeks [Spin, May 1988].
And, you know, the first thing we did, really, is go out and get equipment. The first second that we had the money, we went to the music store and we got all new equipment, stuff that we could use. I mean, we were all playing on trash equipment, alright? Trash. So we were like, the first thing we got was equipment. Of course, you’re getting a lot of money, you’re playing in a band - you never get any money when you’re in a band – you’re gonna go out and get stuff you’ve never had before. You’re gonna take a taxi to the liquor store, okay, that’s only two blocks away. […] You know, so you’re gonna get into that, because you never had money before, you’re 19-20 years old. Manage money? That doesn’t come into your brain. The thing I really wanna, you know, get down on it, is that we did, the first thing is buy equipment; and spent a lot of money on stuff we wanted. And the rest after that was party money, but... [Unknown Source, 1987].
Slash quickly spent the advance money and was back to poverty with Rock Scene listing his worldly possessions when they met the band in likely April or May 1987: "Clean clothes, dirty clothes, a bolo tie, magazines and equipment, all in bags" [Rock Scene, September 1987], and Izzy would claim "I’m so rich I need to borrow $20 to go out tonight" [Rock Scene, September 1987]. Axl had settled down and lived in an apartment with a girlfriend after having lived in "over 37 places, including cars" [Rock Scene, September 1987]. At this time the label had put the band members on a weekly allowance of about $100 a week [Rock Scene, September 1987].

I think they [=Geffen] like us living like this, with no money [Rock Scene, September 1987].
Slash doesn’t get a fuckin’ cent because he spent everybody else’s money on equipment [Rock Scene, September 1987].
Taking to Mike: Do we have cash for dinner? We need food, Mr. C [Rock Scene, September 1987].


Last edited by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 14:20; edited 3 times in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 14:06

JUNE-SEPTEMBER 1986 - LIGHTING UP THE HOLLYWOOD CLUB CIRCUIT


At some point in time Geffen held a party likely in honor of Peter Gabriel and his hit single "Sledgehammer" (likely late 1986 or early 1987). Slash had an interviewed earlier in the afternoon (and got so drunk he peed on his pants), and when he came to the party and was given a real sledgehammer (like a commemorative item), he went out in the parking lot and, for unknown reasons, proceeded to throw it throw thru one of the Geffen windows. Unfortunately, he threw it through the windows of an adjacent building belonging to someone else [Endless Party Magazine, August 1987].

Their next show took place at the Troubadour on July 11. They were now back to playing as "Guns N' Roses" again, as mentioned in the band's fifth newsletter:

"Friday July 11th 1986, at 10:00pm, GUNS N’ ROSES will play the Troubadour, (under our own name, by the way) with brand new songs, cool – props, lots’ a girls, and the rest as a tribute to HOLLYWOOD prior to the production of our debute-album on GEFFEN RECORDS!!!

YEAH!!!

For your personal information, we have been playing around town under psuedonymn “FARGIN BASTIGES”, for promotional reasons, butt finally ... what you’ve been waiting for, a full fuckin’ fledged, teeth grinding, butt slammin’, foot stompin’ stylin’ “GUNS N’ ROSES” show; it will be hot, so be cool and get there early!!!
" [Guns N' Roses Newsletter No. 5, July 1986].

Then followed a show at Bogart's on July 21 before a show at the Club Lingerie gig on July 24. Before this show the band took a time-out to discuss their problems:

[…] we didn’t break up, we just had a long talk; sorted out a lot of shit [L.A. Rocks , August 1986].
There was a conflict of a lot of things and a lot of disagreements at the time of that show. I thought it was one of the worst shows we ever played. But the next day, we had to have it out. A lot of things went to our heads because this is all new to us. If we did break up, who else are we going to play with that we really value as much as we value each other. […]  After the Lingerie show, it was like starting over again. Most of us have worked together off and on. For over 3 years, we’ve exploded on each other many times, and we always come back [L.A. Rocks , August 1986].
But then, just a week later, at Timber's Ballroom in July 31 (Duff claims this happened at a Fender's Ballroom gig on March 31.), Axl turned up so late the band had to start without him. It is probably more likely this happened on March 31 as Duff says, and that it partly lead to the band having the talk on July 24.

In hindsight, we might have seen the seeds of later trouble being sown at this show: Axl turned up so late we had to start without him[/i] [Duff's autobiography, "It's So Easy", 2011, p. 119].
All the recklessness and chaos resulted in the band almost dropping them, according to Izzy, although he says that happened about a years after signing (so in March 1987, but likely before) [Spin, May 1988].

The next two shows were at The Scream on August 15 and at the Whisky A Go Go on August 23. On this last show Slash wore his famous top hat for the first time:

This is the show where I first wore a top hat and I'll never forget it. I got the top hat that day. I was really high and the hat was great because it could help me balance[/i] [Reckless Road].
The band was gaining in popularity and played increasingly high-status gigs, the first was with Ted Nugent on the Santa Monica Civic Center on August 30. This show was followed by a show at the Music Machine on September 13 before the band returned to the LA Street Scene Festival on September 20:

LA Street Scene was a blast. [KNAC, December 1996]
After a long day of other bands playing, we got onstage and started playing, and the kids took that as the signal to just lose it. It was cool, we had all these skinheads throwing oil barrels and playing catch with them, tossing them across the crowd. They were tearing the stage from underneath and all kinds of stuff. After the fourth song, we had so many people onstage we didn't know who was the band or what. Well, the fire marshal shut us down, that was it. The fans, or whoever they were, were really cool. I go in for that shit. That's my big kick - the more hardcore, the more I get off on it. [Faces - Widsom of Slash, June 1989]
We were scheduled to open for Poison, who were headlining one of the bigger stages. It was going to be our biggest high-profile gig to date, and we were ready to blow Poison off the stage. In the end we didn't even have to: we got up there and played, and everybody went nuts, climbing the scaffolding and pushing the stage to and fro in excitement. By the time we were done, the fire marshals decided to close the place down. I remember seeing Poison roll up in all their glitter, ready to go on but unable to. I was quite pleased to see them all dressed up with no stage to play [Slash's autobiography, page 128-129]
We played the Los Angeles “Street Scene” concert for 5,000 people in downtown L.A. We only got to do 4 songs before the crowd went crazy on us. […] We did a song called They’re Out To Get Me and the kids started throwing 60-gallon oil drums at the cops. The crowd went fuckin’ bananas. All these kids – punk rockers, heavy metal kids, everyone – just going nuts. If I could have said, “Tear up downtown!” all of downtown L.A. would have been rubble! But the fire marshals made us stop playing ‘cause all those oil drums were spilling liquid into the electrical system and we were gonna get fried if we stayed onstage. That would have been really heavy! [Hit Parader, May 1987]
They knocked the place down and they were climbing up onstage [Hit Parader, May 1987]
Axl would often arrive late to the band's concerts, a habit that would draw ire from his band mates and slowly drive a wedge between them:

I don't know if it was part of a brilliant strategy, but Axl often arrived at the club far past his band's scheduled start, mere minutes before the following band's scheduled timeslot. Guns N' Roses would then only have the okay to play for ten minutes, so they'd rip through three or four "we're all super pissed off," powerful, in-your-face tunes to whip the amassed crowd into a frenzy. Then it was over. The fans needed more, much more. And they would get it if they went to the next show [Raz Cue, "The Days of Guns, & Raz's", 2015, p. 230].


Last edited by Soulmonster on Mon 24 Jun 2019 - 20:53; edited 4 times in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 14:12

THE HELL HOUSE


After having signed with Geffen in March 1986, the band rented a cheap rehearsal space in an old shopping center called the Golden Mall in Glendale, near the Burbank line. It was better than the Gardner space, and included a little stage [Duff's autobiography, "It's So Easy", 2011, p 112].

In the beginning of and at least into May 1987, the band lived, or hung out, in a "smallish, detached, flaking white-wood house just off Santa Monica Boulevard" [Sounds Magazine, 1987.04.04], also described as "a filthy, blitzed suburban bungalow in an otherwise pristine street in West Hollywood" [Time Out, June 1987]. This place would affectionately be referred to as "The Hell House" and the address was 1139 N Fuller Avenue.

As with their former hang out at Gardner's, The Hell House was also checked in on by the police regularly, as Simon Garfield from Time Out Magazine could confirm when he visited in 1987 for an interview:

"During my brief visit, the cops pull up at the Hellhouse three times: once to advise an occupant against parking on the front lawn; once to announce that if there was any more bottle smashing in the road there would be severe trouble; and once to raid a Hellhouse car and its passengers for drugs. No drugs are found, but one of the women in the car is called Candy, and she winds up with one officer’s home phone number and promises to call" [Time Out, June 1987].

Garfield would also wittily describe witnessing Slash insisting on breaking a bottle of Jim Beam inside the Hell House [Time Out, June 1987].

At some point, according to Izzy, likely in mid-to-late 1987, Alan Niven got them "this huge house in the hills" [Guitar, September 1988]. This house is likely not the Hell House, since the latter wasn't in the hills.

In December 1988, Slash had an apartment on Sunset Boulevard where we lived with a girlfriend called Kimberley [On The Streets, December 1988].


Last edited by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 14:41; edited 5 times in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 14:13

WEST ARKEEN


One of the more interesting friends of the band form their early days was West Arkeen.

The regulars at the Hell House included Duff, Slash, Izzy most nights, and me. Jo Jo, Raz, Danny, Dizzy [Reed], Del [James], and West were there almost all the time. Axl liked writing songs with West. He liked kicking it while West played guitar. I was there all the time, literally spending whole days and nights. There were always random people crashed out on the floor. It was a never-ending revolving door of derelicts, a hilarious party scene [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 85].

West was a great friend of Axl and Duff and would later co-write many of the band's songs. In late 1988, when asked who his favorite musicians are, Axl answered "David Lank and West Arkeen" [Superstar Facts & Pix, No. 16, 1988].

West was also the first artist the band signed to their own label, Uzi Suicide [Raw Magazine, July 1989].

We're definitely going to sign West Arkeen (long-time friend of the band and co-writer of "It's So Easy" off Appetite) and possibly some other acts [Circus Magazine, May 1989].
Axl spent a lot of time hanging out with West and they would be recorded playing together at the Scrap Bar in New York City in July 1989.

Axl would also talk about West in interviews:

West gets all drunk. He was getting drunk every day. He got thrown out of the bar and cut off more times than anybody in history. And, like, all these actors, Nick Nolte and stuff, have partied there for years. So they’ve dealt with all this before but West would get cut off for breakfast, cut off for lunch, cut off for dinner and then talk 'em into opening the bar at three-thirty in the morning so they can make another drink, right? And it was gnarly, right? And so he’s got this fart-ball, and he goes downstairs with it, you know, and he’s all wasted. And he’s beside this older couple and stuff and he, like, keeps doing this fart-ball and making, like, weird faces and fanning his rear end and stuff, like he just farted, like, “Oh... what was that?” And these people go, “You’re disgusting!” and they move away. OK, so then I get this call from Sean Penn, his company or what­ever – these people that work for him – and he wants me to come see an advance screening of his new movie, Casualties of War. And if I want, you know, I can bring West. So West comes up and he’s wasted. So I throw him in the fuckin' shower, help him get dressed and we headed out of there down to the lobby. And there’s this old couple there and this lady introduces herself and goes, “And this is Sean Penn’s parents and they’ll be going with you.” I said, “Hi, my name’s Axl and this is West...” And they were like, “Oh no! You’re that guy in the bar!” ’ He laughed and looked me in the eye for the first time. 'It was Sean Penn’s parents, you know... it was so great. Then we got in the back of this station-wagon, and there’s these little fold-down seats and we’re sitting on them. And, like, somebody pulled up in a car – we were trying to get out of there before these people arrived that were coming to my room – and suddenly there they were. And we were like, “Oh, fuck...” And then I went, “Oh, I'm sorry,” and Sean Penn’s dad turns round and goes, “Listen, goddamnit, don’t ever fuckin’ talk like that again, you understand me?” And then spins around and starts laughing because he just cussed me out.’ He chuckled. 'I thought it was just great. Those guys were great... [Mick Wall, GUNS N' ROSES: The Most Dangerous Band in the World, Sidgwick & Jackson, U.K. 1991, 1993].


Last edited by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 14:31; edited 2 times in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 14:16

OCTOBER 21-DECEMBER 23, 1986 - AXL IS GONE AND OTHER INCIDENTS


In the second half of 1986 the band started to do more high-profile concerts. In October 1986 they were invited to open for Alice Cooper in Santa Barbara. For this gig, Axl again turned up late and was unable to enter the venue. The band had to do without their singer, with Izzy and Duff trading vocals. In Duff's words: "We traded some words with Axl when we found him in the parking lot afterward, but at the end of the day the situation lacked much in the way of consequences" [Duff's autobiography, "It's So Easy", 2011, p 119]. This inability or unwillingness to solve problems within the band, especially with a band member who increasingly got the band in trouble, would remain a fixture of this lineup and would eventually cause such rife conflicts that band members would leave.

When we did that show, we were supposed to do the hour-long ride out there together, but Axl insisted on driving with his girlfriend Erin at the very last minute. We were all aginst it, as was Alan, but Axl convinced him that there was nothing to worry about. We got to the gig; Axl was nowhere to be found, but was apparently on his way. It came time to take the stage - no Axl - so Izzy and Duff and Stave and I got out there and started playing without him. Izzy and Duff sang "Whole Lotta Rosie" by AC/DC and a few other covers. We were opening for Alice Cooper but basically that set was a drunken jam fit for a bar - except we were in an arena. It got so bad that at one point we asked the audience to sing lead and then asked if there was a lead singer in the house. We were friends with the crowd for a minute, but that quickly changed; we ended up insulting them and throwing things at them. It was ridiculous. We stayed up there for the allotted amount of time and then retreated from a totally embarrassing disaster. We got out of there immediately and drove back to Hollywood, so pissed that we talked about kicking Axl out of the band that night and looking for a new singer [Slash's autobiography, p 216-217]
The night of the Alice Cooper gig, Axl showed up late again and then was unable to get into the venue. Izzy and I sang. At the time it was almost funny - though we were definitely pissed, too, and we absolutely trashed the dressing room. We traded some words with Axl when we found him in the parking lot afterward, but at the end of the day the situation lacked much in the way of consequences. We did the show, we got paid, and the crowd was there to see Alice anyway. That was that. For now [Duff's autobiography, "It's So Easy", 2011, p. 119-120]
In May [Steven's got the date wrong], we were given a great opportunity to do a single show with Alice Cooper in Santa Barbara. [...]On the day of the show, we all piled into our new white van (we got another one after Slash totaled the first), while Axl was just standing there, outside. We were yelling to him,"C'mon, Axl." He was all like, "Naw, I'll meet you there; some chick is gonna take me." [...] We were ready to go [on stage], but sure enough, someone was still missing. Next thing you know, we're supposed to be on in five minutes and everyone is screaming, "Where's Axl?" We stalled as long as we could, but we really had to get out there out of respect for Alice. At eight o'clock we hit the stage as scheduled. Without Axl, we just did our best and improvised. We did 'It's So Easy' and Duff sang. After that, we just performed blues jams. We would always include a blazing blues jam in our sets, so we still managed to rock out for the audience, and I don't think they felt incredibly cheated. Izzy and Duff screamed a few words here and there. Duff's tech, Mike "McBob" Mayhue, may have sung something, too. Bottom line was, without Axl present, we didn't deliver the true Guns N' Roses as promised. We just played, packed up our shit, and got out of there. Because of my worship for Alice, and my feeling about what Guns N' Roses was about, it was one of the most humiliating nights of my life [Steven's autobiography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, p. 122-123]
What happened was he, Axl, showed up later than everyone else and didn't get a backstage pass, and they wouldn't let him in. Meanwhile, we were onstage already, playing. We played the whole set without Axl, and I ended up getting really drunk and insulting the crowd. They were wondering what the hell was going on. They probably thought we were just some circus act or some-thing... [Metal Hammer, February 1990]
According to Steven, the band considered firing Axl after this incident:

Afterward, we were all pissed, and for one infuriating moment, we all considered kicking [Axl] our of the band. But we realized there was nothing we could do. The album had already been recorded [Steven must be thinking about the EP Live! Like A Suicide] and Axl was an integral part of our mage and sound, so we never actually talked about getting another singer [Steven's autobiography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, p. 122-123]
The next show was on Halloween, October 31, at Ackermann Hall in Los Angeles together with the bands Thelonious Monster, Dickies and Red Hot Chili Peppers.

Probably the most memorable show of this sort took place on Halloween, 1986. The Red Hot Chili Peppers, who were just starting their rise as a national act, and the Dickies were headlining a show at Ackerman Hall at UCLA, and we opened. We still had yet to enter the studio. We were feuding with Geffen about whether we had enough songs to warrant recording, and we still hadn't found a producer we liked. We reached a compromise with the label to put out a limited edition "bootleg" EP, Live! Like a Suicide, and we had finished it just before this show. That night we felt like we were finally making some forward motion. [...] For me, the cool thing about this show was that Black Flag's Henry Rollins watched our entire set from the wings of the stage and came up to us afterward and told us how much he liked our and. I considered him the most credible guy in rock, and he had a reputation as a guy who didn't mince words. He definitely wouldn't fawn over a band just for the sake of doing so. And we got the thumbs up. Kick ass! [Duff's autobiography, "It's So Easy", 2011, p. 119]
Henry Rollins attended this gig but had little positive to say about any of the bands except Guns N' Roses:

"I went to a show last night. I went to help the soundman set up his system. What shitty bands. What a poor excuse for music. I looked at the crowd all night. There was nowhere else to go. [...] The show was at a university. Those kind of shows are always a joke. There’s something about colleges that really sets me off. [...]The music, what a mess. All of it was so hollow. The opening band was called Guns n’ Roses, and they blew the headliners off so hard it was pathetic " [The Portable Henry Rollins, 1998].

"By 10-07-86, I was in Leeds, England, making my first solo album. Weeks later, I was back in Los Angeles.
Paying for my own record set me back quite a bit. Later that month, Rat Sound, who built Black Flag's PA system, called me and Black Flag roadie/friend Joe Cole, asking if we wanted to make 50 bucks each setting up the system for a show on Halloween night at UCLA. The next day, there we were, loading the same gear out of the same truck from Black Flag's last show.
Four bands on the bill that night. Chili Peppers headlining. The last band to load in was the opener. They were skinny and their gear was ragged. They had a lot of attitude. Joe Cole asked me, "Should we beat some of these hippies up?" I reminded him that we were working for them.

The doors opened, some people straggled in. The longhairs with the attitude hit the stage and their fans, all 50 of them, were up front. The singer said their first record would be out soon and started playing. Joe and I stood with the crowd and watched what sounded like the Sex Pistols incinerating Aerosmith. It was pretty damn good -- great, actually.

Joe asked me what I thought. I said they were going to be big, judging from the A&R men fluttering around the soundboard. The band was called Guns N' Roses.

It was a very memorable Halloween night
" [Los Angeles Weekly, 2013].

The next show didn't happen until December 21 at Fender's Ballroom in Los Angeles.

Excellent show, excellent show. It was excellent. [The audience were] like the LA Street Scene, but a little bit more in control [KNAC, December 1996].
That was probably one of the better shows we ever played. Fantastic, the people that were there. We went on an hour early, so it wasn't as full as by the time Cheap Trick came on. They were slamming. It was every kind of people you could imagine there, and everybody was thrashing [KNAC, December 1996].
The final show for 1986 took place at The Cathouse in Hollywood on December 23.


Last edited by Soulmonster on Mon 24 Jun 2019 - 20:54; edited 2 times in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 14:26

MARCH-DECEMBER 1986 - GEFFEN ALMOST DROPS THE BAND


As time progressed with no record, Geffen president, Ed Rosenblatt, was growing increasingly impatient:

"Signing the group was a crapshoot. I wondered many times if this was going to be one of those super-disasters -- the $100,000 down a rat hole. Tom [Zutaut] was just a young guy with a hot track record. But A&R people are the most important people at a record company. He believed in this band so strongly, and it was his confidence in the band that sold us" [New York Times, December 8, 1991].

Yet, when asking Zutaut when the band would have a record out, Zutaut could only reply:

"They're not ready yet. I don't know when they're going to make a record. But you've got to trust me. This is going to be the biggest band on the label" [New York Times, December 8, 1991].

One of the issues was that the band, according to Zutaut, didn't have enough good songs at the time, yet the band would pressure Geffen to record a record soon after being signed [New York Times, December 8, 1991].

They were broke and frustrated, but I didn't feel like they were ready yet. Until I felt 100 percent sure that they had enough material to make a great debut record, I wasn't prepared to line up a producer and set up a start date [New York Times, December 8, 1991].
In fact, Zutaut's insistence that they still needed to work on writing new songs made the band frustrated leading to fights between the band and Zutaut [New York Times, December 8, 1991]. The band would also use it's manager at the time, Arnold Stiefel, to try to overrule Zutaut's decision by going directly to Rosenblatt who was a close friend of Stiefel's. This caused further friction between the band and Zutaut [New York Times, December 8, 1991]. Rosenblatt, on the other had, trusted Zutaut's conclusion [New York Times, December 8, 1991].

I was so upset that they had tried to go around me, that I was ready to drop them [New York Times, December 8, 1991].
Slash would conform that the band was frustrated:

We didn't know why it was taking so long to get in the studio. But Tom kept pushing us to keep playing and rehearsing. It was hard to get us to buckle down [New York Times, December 8, 1991].
In June 1986 the band had ended their relationship with their manager Stiefel [Los Angeles Times, 1986.06.07]. At some point, Zutaut invited Tim Collins, Aerosmith's manager, to see the band play. When the band members came back to his hotel room, Collins checked into a second room to get some rest. In the morning, he learned that they had ordered $450 worth of drinks and food on his bill. He decided not to manage them [Rolling Stone, November 1988].

Talking about the period after signing with Geffen: And just about every single manager that we met was scared shitless of us [Spin, May 1988]


Last edited by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 14:51; edited 2 times in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 14:34

1986-1990 - THE 'DRUNK FUX' AND OTHER SIDEBANDS AND COLLABORATIONS


The band got an increasing number of friends and followers as they became more popular, including fellow musicians, both great and small, bikers, artists, and street people. One of these friends was Del James.

Del James: "I’ve been involved with Guns N’ Roses for as long as I’ve been in California, which is seven years. I guess that would make it about ’85 that I initially hooked up with them. And when I moved out, I went to a building that said “For rent,” and that was a pad West Arkeen was living in, and Axl was crashing on his floor, and Duff was living next door. So while we were walking through this pad West came out and he asked me if I drank, and back then I did, so I spent, like, the weekend there, and those became my first and only friends in California" [November Rain: Makin' F@*!ing Videos Part II, June 22, 1993].

Our friend Wes had passed out on Thorazines and I didn’t have a place to crash, and Del said I could crash at their place [November Rain: Makin' F@*!ing Videos Part II, June 22, 1993].

Together with Del James and other friends members of GN'R would form a jam band called the Drunk Fux.

We had this band called the Drunk Fux, where we played covers and just basically screwed the whole thing up. But it was okay. […] When we get together, we get completely wasted and book a gig and not show up for it cuz we'll all be too wasted [MTV, May 21, 1993].
Steven and Duff disagrees about this band:

Out of this drunken wasteland [= the Hell House] everyone kind of spontaneously formed a fun jam band called the Drunk Fux. Many different people were in that band, including Tommy Lee and Lemmy. It was just a jam thing really, and we played some free benefit shows around L.A. [...] Axl, West, and Del had their own little clique that wasn't really part of the Drunk Fux, and I couldn't give less of a fuck about it [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 85].
Duff recalls that the Drunk Fux was first formed later when Axl, Slash and Izzy went to New York City for the mixing of Appetite. As he says in his biography: During this time he started playing rhythm guitar in a side project called the Drunk Fux. Todd Crew [former bassist in Jetboy and great fan of the band] would join Drunk Fux playing bass after being kicked out of Jetboy. Steven was on drums, Del James was singing and West Arkeen played lead guitar [Duff's autobiography, "It's So Easy", 2011, p 122].

This contrasts with Steven's biography where he indicates that Drunk Fux was formed earlier and that Axl and his posse didn't want anything to do with it, while Duff indicates Axl was away when Drunk Fux was happening and that indeed Del and Arkeen, who were Axl's friends, sang and played in the band. It appears that Steven is wrong on this and that Duff is correct. GNRontour.com corroborates this by listing a Drunk Fux show in May 1987 with Arkeen and Del participating and one in January 1988 with Axl singing. That Steven is wrong is further corroborated by this quote from May 1992 from Slash:

It’s F-U-X, so we can say that (chuckles). […] It’s not really a band anymore. It was just a bunch of friends. There was West Arkeen, Duff, a guy named Todd that’s no longer around – which was pretty much the reason why Drunk Fux isn’t around anymore, because he passed away, and he was one of the really main members. There was Del James, who is a really good friend of ours (?), and I. […] So, it was a band that we just went out with a sort of like, you know, juvenile attitude and just – we’d go out and [muted], and we’d book a gig in a club and we’d just hang out. I never made one gig, myself. I would always be passed out in a road case in the back somewhere. That was the whole, like, little touch of Drunk Fux that I had. […] We had a great logo. We got some t-shirts made and that was cool (laughs). We won’t be recording soon, okay? [MTV Headbanger's Ball, May 1992].
Slash actually missed all the Drunk Fux because he was too wasted:

Slash actually didn’t make any of the gigs. Like, the first five gigs because he was always passed out in the back. It is just a kind of a fun thing, you know. And we always play in front of just, like, chairs [MTV, May 21, 1993].
According to Goldmine Magazine, in February 1989 a promotional CD was released with a band called Black And White featuring "Slash, Axl Rose, two members of Motley Crue and two members of Ratt" [Goldmine Magazine, May 1989]. Axl and Slash contributed a "guest rap" on the song "Rainbow Bar and Girls" [Circus Magazine, May 1989]. According to Circus Magazine, "Black and White" was a duo, but it doesn't say who played in this band [Circus Magazine, May 1989]. The promotional CD release coincided nicely with the American Music Awards, in which 'Sweet Child O' Mine' was voted Best Rock Single of the Year" [Goldmine Magazine, May 1989].

Also in 1989, it was reported that Axl was collaborating with Steve Jones from the Sex Pistols in his second solo record [Hit Parader, July 1989]. From this rumors spread that Axl would take over the singing responsibilities after Johnny Rotten in The Sex Pistols. Axl would deny this in an interview done in early 1990:

We just jammed with Steve Jones, that's all. He comes up to Slash’s, we talk on the phone. It’s like he’s a friend of the family you know? Slash is really into the guitar parts on the Steve Jones record. And I really like a lot of the songs. And we did the one Sex Pistols song together on it, “Did You No Wrong”. You know, so we try and get up and jam with him whenever we can. I mean, I slept through his New Year’s Eve gig and I was supposed to do three songs with him, man. But I hadn’t slept in, like, three days and now it's like I feel really bad about it. I definitely owe him one. ‘And the guy gets screwed over, man,’ he continued, smiling dolefully.

He did the Palace [Theatre, in Hollywood] and they put the curtain down when Slash and I were setting up at the side of the stage getting ready to do the encore, you know? They walked off stage, we were gonna walk right back on, and this guy shut the curtain and told the curtain guy to leave it ’cos he didn’t want the show to continue! So we went down and I grabbed the guy – you know, I was with Steve Jones and stuff – and I grabbed the guy and he was like, “I don’t like your hand on my shoulder.” I was like, “I don’t give a fuck what you like! Put the curtain up or I’m gonna go out there and start a riot!” But then they’d taken the drum-set down and once the mikes and the drum-set are down it’s over, you know? So it was like... fucked.

Then another time [at the Palace a few weeks before] we were supposed to do “Suffragette City” with Mick Ronson and Ian Hunter – Steve Jones and Slash and me. But then Steve decided he didn’t wanna stick around, so me and Slash got up and did “White Light/White Heat” with Ian and Mick. I didn’t even know the song and neither did Slash, we learned it really quick right before we walked on stage. I remember just following Ian around going ooh wooh, white light la la... It was fuckin’ great
[Mick Wall, GUNS N' ROSES: The Most Dangerous Band in the World, Sidgwick & Jackson, U.K. 1991, 1993].
Axl also added background vocals on the song "I Will Not Go Quietly" from Don Henley's album "The End of the Innocence" which was released in June 1989. To return the favor, Henley would step in to replace Steven on that year's American Music Awards [Circus Magazine, May 1989]. Steven was at the time in rehab. The song that was chosen was 'Patience' and band management would claim that since the original version of the song doesn't feature drums, Steven simply "made other commitments", yet when the band realized they needed a "drummer as a visual timekeeper, they called on Henley" [Circus Magazine, May 1989].

Slash, who was dating the famous porn star Traci Lords, would lend "his talents to a demo" she was making [Circus Magazine, May 1989].


Last edited by Soulmonster on Fri 5 Jul 2019 - 12:59; edited 3 times in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 14:38

SPLITTING THE LOOT


Early on, presumably before being signed to Geffen in 1986, the band hired the lawyer Peter Paterno to construct "a legal framework for what had been just a one-for-all-and-all-for-one-gang". The band had gotten in contact with him earlier when Vicky Hamilton had used him to draw up agreements. Paterno explained to the band that they needed a partnership agreement. As Duff said, "He did a great job lassoing in a bunch of guys and making sure we understood the implications of various aspects of the contracts among the band members and between the band and the label" [Duff's autobiography, "It's So Easy", 2011, p 100].

One of the first things the band argued over was splitting publishing royalties. Despite the band members contributing in complex ways to songwriting, they finally agreed to split everything equally across the board. And their lawyer enshrined it in writing [Duff's biography].

At some point, when working on Appetite, the band gathered in their manager's place (Alan Niven) in Los Feliz to sort our who would get song writing credits. They had already discussed this in 1986 (see above), and then decided to split everything equally (Duff's biography]. This time Axl ended up receiving more. Axl would shed light on this when he in 1989 said they had calculated that he wrote 41 % of the music of Appetite for Destruction, but that they still split the revenues "pretty close" to equal among the five members [Howard Stern, February 1989; RIP, April 1989].

According to Steven, during this meeting Axl argued for a bigger share and tricked Steven into getting 5 % of his, resulting in 25 % to Axl, 15 % to Steven, and 20 % to each of the three remaining band members:

Now, I thought it was kind of a formality because we had talked about all this before and from day one it was always supposed to be an equal share for everybody. But Axl had changed his tune. Axl wanted a bigger slice of the pie. Axl didn't think it was fair to split royalties evenly five ways on our songs. He believed he was entitled to more than the rest of us. The other guys were smart, they just stared at the floor. No one said a fucking thing. I don't know if Axl intimidated them or if they just knew that silence was the best way to deal with his ego. Well, I couldn't just shut the fuck up about it. The reason I wouldn't dummy up was I was so outraged. So right of the bat, I was like, "Screw you, I was here from the beginning, I worked on putting those songs together just as much as you." I had no trouble standing up to Axl because I was right. So now there's this deadly silence again, and it is obvious that its become a big fucking deal. Still, no one else is saying anything, so rather than get into a big argument, I proposed what I thought was a fair offer: "Considering Axl did write most of the lyrics, which is a huge fucking part, I'll give you five percent of my twenty percent." Axl shot me this look of not thanks, not of appreciation, but of arrogance and triumph. It was like he expected it. So I looked around the room because what I expected was for everyone else to follow suit and up the ante too, but the room went dead quiet again. I looked around and everyone kind of started taling about other stuff. The matter was over, settled, done. Axl was happy and I was like, "Fuck!" So it went 25 percent to Axl, 20 percent for each of the other guys, and 15 percent for me. The entire ordeal lasted only a couple of minutes [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 112-113]
In the October 1992 issue of RIP Magazine, after Steven had been fired from Guns N' Roses, Axl would talk about the mistake of giving Steven more than he felt he deserved:

At one point, in order to keep this band together, it was necessary for me to give him a portion of my publishing rights. That was one of the biggest mistakes I've made in my life, but he threw such a fit, saying he wasn't going to stay in the band. We were worried about not being able to record our first album, so I did what I felt I had to do. In the long run I paid very extensively for keeping Steven in Guns N' Roses. I paid $1.5 million by giving him 15% of my publishing off of Appetite For Destruction [RIP, October 1992].
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 14:40

MAY-DECEMBER 1986 - LOOKING FOR A PRODUCER


The solution to the problem of the band not having enough good songs for a full-length album, was to record a shorter EP. This served a two-fold purpose, it kept the band occupied while they could write and rehearse, and it would help create an underground following. The work on this record started in the late summer of 1986.

But they still needed a producer.

The original idea had been to travel to Britain to record their debut record [Los Angeles Times and L.A. Weekly, June 1986; Sound Connection, July 1986] with Bill Price (Sex Pistols, Pretenders) as the producer [L.A. Rocks, August 1986], but that didn't work out, so the band continued to look for a producer in the US. Bill Price would later mix the 'Use Your Illusion' records.

The band had clear ideas about what they wanted in regards to producers. According to Vicky Hamilton, at the day of signing the handed a list of possible producers to Tom Zutaut [Vicky Hamilton, "Appetite for Dysfunction", page 7]. But finding the right one was difficult. As Duff said, "Everybody wanted to take the edge off our music or to transform it into something they already understood".

Tom Werman, Mötley Crüe's producer, armed with a "case of light beer" [Juke Magazine, July 1989] "came down to rehearsal, covered his ears and left," according to Duff [Rolling Stone, November 1988].

Manny Charlton from Nazareth was flown in and the band worked with him for three days, according to Izzy [Guitar, September 1988] resulting in the famous Sound City Sessions bootlegs that were comprised of at least 27 tracks. But, as Axl would state it, "it just didn't feel right" [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1987]. Despite this, they recorded many songs with Charlton and were thinking about what to do with the master tapes:

We spent time with Manny Charlton from Nazareth. He came over because we were thinking bout having him produce the record. We were in the studio for two and a half days and we did everything live. We recorded 25 or 30 tunes. We never did anything with that album but we have the masters to it. It's something where we'll go back and pick through it. A lot of the stuff that comes out when your just jamming as a band is the best [Guitar, September 1988[/url]].
Geffen planned to "release [the Charlton tracks] as a kind of legal bootleg" [L.A. Weekly, June 1986] or "release some of the demo material as an 'authorized bootleg' " [Sound Connection, July 1986]. This first happened 32 years later when Appetite for Destruction was re-released in 2018.

Paul Stanley from Kiss was another of the would-be producers (some time before June 1986), but according to Duff, he was dismissed when he wanted to add double kick drums to Steven's kit [Duff's autobiography, "It's So Easy", 2011, p 118]. Other band members were altogether not impressed with Stanley:

Paul Stanley came down to one of our shows and hung out where we hang out. I'm looking at this guy watching what we do. He's a nice guy, but he didn't have a clue as to what we were doing. Everyone gets the basic idea: They're a rock 'n' roll band. But they don't get the formula [Los Angeles Times, 1986.06.07].
We kept meeting all these schmuckos, for example this famous rock star, I won't name any names, he just wanted to change the music. Like, "Don't Cry," they wanted to change the chorus and everything... we were just saying 'fuck off' [Endless Party Magazine, August 1987].
And Stevie's claim to fame at the time was that he had no tom toms, except for a floor tom tom, he had the simplest kit in town...snare drum, floor tom tom...kinda like the Cramps set, you know. The first thing this guy says, this famous rock star, he goes "You need tom toms, you need this, etc..." [Endless Party Magazine, August 1987].
Paul Stanley of Kiss saw one of our shows and became very interested in producing us. He contacted Zutaut, and Tom arranged for us to meet him. I was so stoked, I couldn't sleep. [...] Paul came to the apartment and sadly, almost immediately, the guys hated him. [...] To be fair, I am sure Paul felt he had to strut in with an authoritative manner to show us he could be in charge, but nothing, I mean nothing, he said resonated with us [[Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 107-111]].
[...] Paul came to us because he was interested in producing. Slash had him come over and I sat down and talked production with him and played him the demo. He wanted to rewrite two of our very favorite songs, so it was over right then and there [Hit Parader, December 1986].
We talked with Paul Stanley for about five minutes and he wanted to rewrite 'Jungle' and something else so that was the end of the conversation, and now he's going round saying he was going to produce the record "but these guys were too crazy," this and that. No, there was no chance of him producing the record. We talked to him once, that was it [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1987].
Yes, [Stanley] wanted to rewrite “Paradise City” or “Jungle”. We were driving back from Tijuana, and we brought back three or four bottles of Tequila, I don’t remember. We met him and he told us that he wanted to rewrite some songs, so we started to drink tequila and burp in front of him. Slash got to say something to the press. We didn’t let him produce anything (laughs) [Popular 1, November 1992].

Mutt Lange, the producer behind AC/DC's 'Back in Black' was another possibility, but he demanded $400,000 just to walk into the room (one million according to Axl in December 1987 [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1987]) plus a share of future earnings from the record. It was too expensive for the band. Could it be Lange that Axl was referring to in June, 1986, when he said the following: "We've been very busy with a lot of new pressures we've never experienced before. We've got to go have a meeting with some guy that's a millionaire. I don't have a cent in my pocket and I have to act like I'm more in charge than he is. That's really strange."

In this period, Axl also wanted Thomas Ray Barker as the producer [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1987]. It was also reported that the band met with Rick Rubin, probably in early 1987, allegedly because he wanted the band to make a song for a movie [Endless Party Magazine, August 1987].

By December 1986, the band was still discussing with Geffen on who would be the producer of their album, trying to find someone who would be able to do the band and their songs justice. It was reported in November 1988 that around this time (?) the band disbanded for a while, but came back together again [Rolling Stone, November 1988]

We recorded a couple of test tracks with different producers and [Geffen] decided it was "too radio". That was really nice to hear. [KNAC, December 1986].
It was very hard to find someone to produce the record because some of the main producers of our favorite material from the seventies have changed their styles, their approach, or burned out, you know, or people that the record industry won't work with any more, just because they don't know what they are doing because they are too into drugs or something [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1987].
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 14:53

DECEMBER 1986 - THE BAND RELEASES 'LIVE!? LIKE A SUICIDE'


To "all the people who have helped keep us alive".

--------------------------------------------------------------

In the summer of 1986 the band was struggling to find a producer for their upcoming debut album [see separate section] [L.A. Rocks, August 1986]. To do something the band and label decided to release a limited edition "bootleg" album. The band's newsletter from July 1986 would describe this as an "independently released" limited album with the title "Guns N' Roses Bootleg Album", and that it would be released within the month [Guns N' Roses Newsletter No. 5, July 1986]. This did not happen. In August it would be correctly be described as a limited edition "bootleg" titled 'Live! Like a Suicide" [L.A. Rocks, August 1986]. The idea was both to keep the band busy while they worked on new songs for the debut record and help to create buzz and enlarge the band's fan base.

The EP was eventually released in December 1986. It was released on the UZI SUICIDE logo, allegedly the band's own label but in reality it was released by Geffen Records itself to make it seem this was an independent release. The accompanying press release was sent out by "the Stravinski Brothers" and signed by "Alan G Stravinski," obviously Alan Niven [December 1986, Press release].

As a sidenote, the band would later use the Uzi Suicide label to sign other artists, including their friend West Arkeen. And Slash would joke that they also intended to release an exercise video on it, based on "Slash-aerobics" [Circus Magazine, May 1989].

The pressing of 'Live! Like a Suicide' was limited to only 10,000 copies to make it exclusive [Hit Parader, April 1987; Goldmine Magazine, May 1989]. The songs on the EP were 'Mama Kin', 'Nice Boys', Move To The City' and 'Reckless Life'. Originally, the band wanted four cover songs on one side (including 'Jumpin Jack Flash' and 'Heartbreak Hotel') and four original songs on the other [Concert Shots, May 1986].

Tom [Zutaut] had the idea for us to go in the studio and record an EP under our own label, Uzi Suicide, which was actually financed by Geffen. [...] Geffen wanted to put out the live album quickly and get people even more excited about us. It would also get us warmed up to record our full-length album [...] The idea was to have a "live" record with thousands of people screaming in the background, therey making is sound as popular as, or maybe more popular than, we actually were. So yes, we knew from the start that they were going to add an audience. We were cool with it. Just as long as it sounded right. We didn't want this album to sound tinny or cheesy. Geffen's engineers told us there would be too miuch shit involved (i.e., it would cost too much) to actually record a live record, so we were told to create the live audience effects in the studio [[Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 107-108]].
The songs on Live! Like A Suicide was recorded in Pasha Studios right next to Paramount Studios near Melrose Avenue in Hollywood and it took no more than "two or three days" [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 109]. Spencer Proffer was hired to produce and it was his studio [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 108]. The band made a mix-tape of their influences which was handed over to Proffer. The tape was called "Spencer's Easy Listening" and was meant to help him in creating the sound the band was looking for [RAW Magazine, May 1989].

We were all in the same soundproof room and we actually recorded those songs together to give it a "live" feel, instead of each performer laying down a separate track, then assembling the tune. The only stuff they overdubbed was the backing vocals. If you listen closely to "Nice Boys," you can hear Axl singing backup to his own vocals [[Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 109]].
After we finished the songs, Spencer added the audience. He used archived tapes of live performances by Dio and Quiet Riot and mixed the cheers in [[Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 108]].
The band would claim the time with Proffer only resulted in a demo [Hit Parader, December 1986], to keep up the illusion that the EP was recorded live. Slash, as late as September 1988, would still state it was a live recording [Guitar, September 1988], as would Duff and Steven in December 1988, even to the point of arguing that a live record is more accurate in presenting the band [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1988].

In May 1987, it was also said in an interview that they had argued "profusely" with Proffer, and "forcing him to leave the project"[RIP Magazine, May 1987], which suggests why Proffer was not used as the producer for Appetite for Destruction. Despite this, Steven would later claim he loved working with Proffer [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 108-109]. In December 1987, Axl would admit that the EP was recorded in Spencer's studio, despite him making the songs "sound really weak" [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1987].

The band would explain why they released the EP:

Because we wanted an inexpensive dedication to all the kids who helped us get by when we were really low and had no money and were living in abandoned apartments. The kind of record that not everyone will have, because we're only printing 10,000 copies initially [Hit Parader, December 1986].
There is covers on [Live! Like A Suicide] that we wanted to put out because we do them live and the people like them live, and we kinda wanted to do this like, 'this is for you', and this is something that we have been doing in our set[KNAC, December 1986].
It's like an inexpensive dedication to all the kids that helped us get going when we had no money[Hit Parader, April 1987].
Live, "Like a Suicide” is indicative of what this band was all about when we first got together. We didn't sit around in rehearsal studios saying we have to be like this or that. We wanted to go out and play live. We would write songs real fast because we had already booked the gigs. We were an angry bunch of kids. That Ep means a lot to me, because we wrote songs, got them together in an evening, and then went out and played them. The album has songs that we sat down and worked on and actually wrote and worked it out. "Suicide” was from the early days, the beginning[Guitar, September 1988[/url]].
The EP was finished just before the October 31 show at Ackermann Hall. 'Move to the City' received some airplay, especially in the Los Angeles area, as well as overseas, and the 10,000 copies of the first pressing were sold out in 4 weeks with no advertisement [Goldmine Magazine, May 1989]. In December 1986 the band were talking about a reissue [KNAC, December 1986].

The band would claim they financed the release of Live! Live A Suicide with their own money:

We financed it off… pretty much the bulk of money that we had, you know, accumulated there and there [Unknown source, June 1987].
So the purpose was to release a fake live EP allegedly released by the band itself, from their own money, to foster more hype about the band and build anticipation for the full-length record to come.


Last edited by Soulmonster on Mon 24 Jun 2019 - 20:57; edited 1 time in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 14:58

DECEMBER 1986 - ALAN NIVEN BECOMES THE BAND'S MANAGER


When Geffen signed the band they did not formally have any management, and it is likely they wanted someone more established than Vicky Hamilton. After having ended their relationship Stiefel in came Alan Niven, who, according to KNAC in December 1986, was originally meant to just help out with getting the EP Live! Like A Suicide out.

Alan Niven was part of Stravinski Brothers Management, together with Doug Goldstein [Kerrang! March 1989]. Niven became their manager and Goldstein would later become their tour manager.

Geffen assigned a personal manager for us, Alan Niven. He was a big, shit-talking tough guy with a British accent. He was also currently managing the established L.A. band Great White. I know the guys were hoping for Doug Taylor or Doc McGee to manage us, because they managed huge acts like Bon Jovi and Motley Crue. But Alan was raw and hungry and we would be there for us. We all liked him. He was uncompromising and brutally driven [...] and he was gonna bust ass, get us busy, and get us to the top [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 109-110]
The band was initially very happy with Alan as their manager:

Alan does more work in one day than any of these so-called professional big-time people that we have worked with. We've got a lot of work to do, and we need work done, too. [...] we need someone doing the job. [KNAC, December 1986]
The band would remark that one of the reasons they like him is that when “he took us out for drinks [at Barney’s Beanery], he showed us he could drink as much or more than we do" [Rock Scene, September 1987].
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 18:31

FINALLY THE BAND FINDS MIKE CLINK


As mentioned in previous chapters, a big problem was finding the right producer for their first album and they had tried out quite a few. But eventually they met Mike Clink. According to Axl, they met Clink at "The Rage", but it is not known what that was [Endless Party Magazine, August 1987].

Clink loved Guns N' Roses and had seen them live a few times. He did a playback and said, "This is how I think your record should sound." As Duff would say, "It was basically us live. And I immediately thought, That's exactly right" [Duff's autobiography, "It's So Easy", 2011, p 120].


[...] it took us a long time to find Mike Clink. And Mike Clink is like, we worked with him and it's basically like a co-produced album. But, you know, we got him for a lower amount of money [?], giving him the name, and plus then he in turn gave us full freedom to do whatever we wanted. Which worked really good for us. And he trusted me a lot in the studio, with all the vocal ideas, because most of the harmonies and stuff I came up with, like 'It's So Easy' and 'Paradise City,' I came up with the night I was recording those parts because I'd never had the opportunity to work on it before [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1987].
[...]we went with Mike Clink was because we’re so set in our ways that we didn’t want anybody to re-write our songs. So what we did for the album was, we signed up with an engineer, who was really hot shit. He produced the album. Basically he just got all the sounds, and produced it. He just basically got Guns N’ Roses on tape [Rock Scene, August 1988].
With my favourite punk bands, the bass was the loudest thing and led the way. And now as Mike Clink started to produce the songs that would make up Appetite, the bass was the loudest, roundest thing on the recordings. It had a lot of space. And it wasn't on the outside or underneath the way it was on a lot of records back then-Clink had it right in the middle [Duff's autobiography, "It's So Easy", 2011, p 121].
Mike is really, really good. He let us have a lot of freedom to do what we wanted to do. We were basically in the production of this record, you know, we were there like every step of the way, every step of the way. When we went to mix it, you know, usually these people don't have anybody there, we went there with the mixing, we were there when they mastered, we were there. And so when you get this record, you know, maybe it's not produced as well as something else you might hear that's done by the best people in the world, but that's because this is more real, this is us. This isn't somebody else doing it, this is us. It's our work [Unknown UK source, June 1987].
[Mike] pushes us to do a better job of what we want. […] He makes us analyze things [Rock Scene, September 1987].
Steven was initially not so happy with Clink, though:


[...] Our producer Mike Clink came up to me and suggested I change my drum setup. [...] Mike asked me to change "Anything Goes" and that really hit a nerve.

"Fuck you, don't tell us how to write songs." I got so pissed because you don't meddle with the music. I pouted, stomped around, and behaved like a real dick. [...]

So we tried his idea, and to my surprise, it came out great. [...] But I will be the first to admit when I'm wrong or out of line, and after we worked it out, I looked Mike straight in the eye and said, "I am so sorry"
[Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 116-117].
The band affected the non-smoker Clink in various ways:


Yeah, we all smoke a lot, and we were in the studio for a couple of months. He went to his doctor one day and he said, “Man, you gotta stop smoking.” [Rock Scene, August 1988].
We used to get him all drunk and shit [Rock Scene, August 1988].
You should have seen him. When we first met him he was Mike Clink and then after a while with us he was Mike Clink plus 15-20 years. After we finished the album there was a complete difference. Then he started going out, he started screwing around with all these different girls, he broke up with his girlfriend. Then he started getting difficult about jobs. He started getting real picky [Rock Scene, August 1988].
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 18:32

1987-1988 - WHO IS THE BOSS?


The internal rivalry in the band would be fully apparent in the 90s, but already in the 80s were the seeds for these conflicts sown.

In June 1987 the band members were asked how the band operated, and Axl would reply:

It’s democratic, like many other bands [Unknown French Publication, June 1987].
Still, Axl quickly took a leading position and would to an increasing extent describe the band as his, as in an interview with Steven Harris in December 1987:

Being asked if he is the moral head of the band: With the direction, yeah. With the direction and with, you know, my real strong believes and faith in what we do as artists, yeah. I'd say so [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1987].
A year later, Harris would interview Duff and Steven and took the opportunity to ask for their comments about Axl's comments in-which he claimed Axl said he had to take care of the rest of the guys in the band:

As far as he knows! [laughter] Fuck! Did he say that?! Yeah right! […] He wasn't laughing when he said that or anything? [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1988].
Yes, he is just there, every day, taking care of us! […] Don't get me wrong, we love Axl and we always will, but that's just the way he is. But we are all big boys, we can take care of ourselves [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1988].
During interviews Axl was often the most vocal, both due to his strong personality but also due to his band mates invariably being under the influence. Here is Karen Burch's description in April 1986: "Although I hate to focus solely on Axel Rose, the vocalist's personality certainly demands attention. Axel appears to be the creative force that drives the band. Soft-spoken and intensely serious, he prefers to converse mainly about "the music." While the band refutes that there are any one leader, per se, Axel emerges as the dominant figure [...]" [Music Connection, April 1986]. In this interview Slash would also famously quip that Axl wants to be the Ayatollah.

In the very early days, Izzy was more vocal, but as the band grew in popularity, he gradually slid into the shadows, allowing Axl and, to an increasing extent, Slash to front the band. As Izzy would state in September 1988:

I don't really enjoy being a center of attention. [...] It suits me fine. I don't even have to think about actually planning out what I want to say in interviews, or what topics I'm gonna talk about. It's funny, because I can walk through a club without anybody recognizing me, knowing me or bothering me, whenever I want to. [Axl and Slash], they're so out front, no matter where they go they get spotted [Circus Magazine, September 1988].
I never was the leader, in fact. I was the member that gave balance […] [Popular 1, November 1992].
Duff would echo this statement:

I don't give a shit. Slash and Axl are vocal and they like talking a lot. I mean, we're all onstage when we play, and that's what's most important. As far as magazines and stuff like that goes, it doesn't matter who does what. It's a band, and our fans know it is. They know it's not just Axl and Slash. There's no jealousy about that between anybody in this band [Circus Magazine, September 1988].
In late 1987, Axl would also indicate that any disagreement in regards to the musical direction of the band had been put to rest by late 1987, and that the band now was on the same page:

[...] we were practising in a one-room studio and I was standing outside because there was no PA, so I stood outside to listen clearly, in a parking lot, I heard 'Nightrain,' and 'Rocket Queen,' and 'My Michelle' coming together for the first time in rehearsal, right, and these guys were all okay, they were on top of it. I was like, my eyes were watering and I had chills, and I was like going, "We finally got the songs I've been looking for," and Izzy told me, you know, out [?], "Now I see what the fuck you've been talking about for the last three years." It's hard to convince someone, they don't know what they had, I'm real good at seeing a person's potential, okay. Sometimes so much so that it costs me problems because I see the potential in this person and I put so much belief in them, you know, but they never, but they don't have the guts to dig for what I see inside of them, you know, so some times that's been problems. But other times, like with Izzy, I was always pushing him with songs and now he's really glad I did and it worked out good for the both of us. [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1987].
Again, Steve Harris would confront Duff and Steven a year later with this comment from Axl, receiving the following response:

No, no, no [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1988].
We were going nowhere when we were in the studios. We didn't even have a record out the [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1988].
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 18:34

1987 - RECORDING THEIR DEBUT ALBUM


In April 1987, Axl described his vision for their debut album and beyond:

We’ve got our progressions already planned out. How we’re going to grow. This record’s going to sound like a showcase. I sing in, like, five or six different voices, so not one song is quite like another, even if they’re all hard rock. In the last year I’ve spent over thirteen hundred dollars on cassettes, everything from Slayer to Wham! – to listen to production, vocals, melodies, this and that. I’m from Indiana, where Lynyrd Skynyrd were considered God to the point that you ended up saying, ‘I hate this fucking band!’ And yet, for our song Sweet Child O’ Mine I went out and got some old Lynyrd Skynyrd tapes to make sure that we’d got that downhome, heartfelt feeling [1987.04.04].
In June 1988, Axl told Rock Scene Magazine that when they signed with Geffen they had 27 songs:

When we went into the studio initially, to do some test tracks and lay down some songs and see what we had together, we had about 27 songs together when Geffen first signed us [Rock Scene, June 1988].
In July 1989 he would also say that they originally wanted Appetite to be a double album:

[…] Appetite for Destruction was meant to be a double LP too, but Geffen got cold feet about putting out a double as a debut LP [Juke Magazine, July 1989].
And that the purpose was to make a consistent hard rock album:

We can only put so many songs on one, album, and we wanted our first record ('Appetite For Destruction') to be a full hard rock record from beginning to end [Kerrang! June 1989].
Preproduction rehearsals for Appetite took place at SIR Studios in Burbank [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 112].

Recording for Appetite took place at Rumbo Studios (Rumbo Recorders), at 20215 Saticoy Street, Canoga Park, CA, and happened over two weeks in January 1987. It has also been said the recording took three months and was finished by the end of March 1987 [Rock Scene, September 1987]. Rumbo Studios was chosen by Clink to keep the guys away from their wild lives in Hollywood.

When we started working on Appetite we were in a hotel in Manhattan Beach, which was like a forty-five-minute drive to Rumbo. I have no idea why we were so far from the studio. [[Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 116]].
Listening to the playback of recently recorded songs in Rumbo Studios: I think it's going to kick ass. It's against the - mainstream grain. It's definitely a case of you'll either love it or hate it - which is good, as long as you notice it [Kerrang! June 1987].
Well, it was done live, pretty much. The drums, the rhythm guitar, the bass are all live from the same room. So there's bleeding on each other's instruments, and tweets [?] on other's mics. Things like that. Just to get the most energy and good [?] to the songs [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1987].
Talking about how he stretched himself vocally, singing bass parts and reaching the F above high C, and that he’s pleased with his vocal performance, as is Geffen: Tom [Zutaut] told me if I lost my voice it was okay, I could use my rough tracks [Rock Scene, September 1987].
We go in, play, and try to do it the first or second take, and if what comes out is decent enough to use, you don’t go back and keep fixing it – you lose the spirit. When we did solos, I couldn’t stand going back and doing it more than three times [Rock Scene, September 1987].
My contributions to the record took six days, start to finish, and I was done. On the other hand, Axl would insist on doing his vocals one line at a time, and that took much longer. [...] It was beyond what a perfectionist would demand. And it soon became obvious to us that it was obsession for the sake of obsession [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 118].
We did the basic tracks in two weeks. We'd have all the amps set up in one room. We had the guitar amps isolated and the bass direct and Steve's drums were in the room and we played in the room off the drums, putting all the tunes down in two weeks. Once in a while Slash would do a live solo an he usually would go back and recut them. He is a perfectionist in a lot of ways. [...] When we were going to do that [= add scratch vocals to play along with] Axl got a sore throat so he ended up doing it later. There were previous recordings where we recorded with vocals [Guitar, September 1988].
[...] we did basic tracks in two weeks and then I went back in. Izzy did the basic tracks, that’s it. Otherwise what’s coming out of the left speaker is what we did in two weeks. Everything he did was in mono. I went back and did all the stereo stuff. Izzy is on the left, I'm on the right and I'm in stereo with the echo and slide stuff. I'm more distorted than Izzy. [...] I went in and did basic tracks and played along with the drums and bass and Izzy. I would screw around but keep the actual song going. Then I would go back later and redo the whole rhythm and all the leads in front of the monitors in the control room. I had the monitors cranked up really loud and would just play along. I can’t play with headphones [Guitar, September 1988].
We actually went in and recorded in pre-production. We picked the 12 songs we were gonna stick with, refined them, went a in, recorded them and put them on the record [Kerrang! June 1989].
With only two weeks for the recording, most of the songs were done in very few takes, like 'Sweet Child O' Mine' which was recorded in one take, while 'Think About You', one of the simpler songs, required more (Steven would say 50 takes while Duff would argue 8) [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1988]. Duff would later claim that the whole process has been rushed, and that they would spend more time on their second album:

Again, the success and the respect that we've gotten from the industry and from our company will just give us more time and more of ourselves to put into the next record. You know, we'll be able to write...like, the first one it was rushed, and while "these guys ain't shit, they gonna do shit," you know, and blah blah, so, and so we were kind of rushed, in a way mentally, and, and, eh... [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1988].
After all recordings for Appetite was done, Axl, Slash and Izzy went to New York to sit in on the mixing process. The guys who mixed the record was Steve Thompson and Michael Barbiero who had previously mixed the last Tesla record [Unknown UK source, June 1987].

Looking back, in early 1990, Axl would describe the process like this:

But what people don’t understand is that there was a perfec­tionist attitude to Appetite For Destruction. I mean, there was a definite plan to that. We could have made it all smooth and polished. We went and did test tracks with other producers and it came out smooth and polished – with Spencer Proffer. And Geffen Records said it was too fuckin’ radio. That’s why we went with Mike Clink. We went for a raw sound, because it just didn’t gel having it too tight and concise. We knew this. We knew the way we are on stage and the only way to capture that on the record is to make it somewhat live. Doing the bass, the drums and the rhythm guitar at the same time. Getting the best track, having it a bit faster than you play it live, OK, so that brings some energy into it. Adding lots of vocal parts and overdubs with the guitars, adding more music to capture… ’Cos Guns N’ Roses on stage, man, can be, like, out to lunch. Visually we’re all over the place and stuff and you don’t know what to expect. But how do you get that on a record? But somehow you have to do that. So there’s a lot more that’s needed on a record. That’s why recording is my favourite thing, because it’s like painting a picture. You start out with a shadow, or an idea, and you come up with something that’s a shadow of that. You might like it better. It’s still not exactly what you pictured in your head, though. And then you add all these things and you come up with something you didn’t even expect... Slash will do, like, one slow little guitar fill that adds a whole different mood that you didn't expect. That’s what I love. All of a sudden it’s like you’re doing a painting and then you go away and you come back and it’s different. You use the brush this way and allow a little shading to come in and you go, ‘‘Wow, I got a whole different effect on this that’s even heavier than what I pictured. I don’t know quite what I’m onto but I’m on it,” you know? “Paradise City”, man, that’s like, I came up with two of those first vocals – there’s five parts there – I came up with two and they sounded really weird. Then I said, look, I got an idea. I put two of these vocal things together, and it was the two weirdest ones, the two most obtuse ones. And Clink’s like, “I don’t know about that, man...” I'm like, "I don’t know either, why don’t we just sleep on it?” So we go home and the next day I call him up and now I’m like, “I don’t know about this.” But he goes, “No I think it’s cool!” So now he was the other way... So then we put three more vocal parts on it and then it fit. But the point is, that wasn’t how we had it planned. We don’t really know how it happened [Mick Wall, GUNS N' ROSES: The Most Dangerous Band in the World, Sidgwick & Jackson, U.K. 1991, 1993].


Last edited by Soulmonster on Mon 24 Jun 2019 - 21:02; edited 1 time in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 18:41

JUNE 1987 - THE BAND TRAVELS TO ENGLAND


We fought every inch of the way to get over here to play the Marquee. And that's a dream we've all had since eighth grade [Record Mirror - July 11, 1987].
________________________________________________________________________________

The band played few shows in the first half of 1987, only one show at Whisky A Go Go on March 16 and one show at the Roxy on March 29.

While the band was looking for producers, writing new songs, and battling with their record company and addictions, their EP 'Live! Like a Suicide', which had been released in December the previous year, went about without causing much stir except for in England where it gained cult popularity. The English music magazine Kerrang! even sent a photographer to Los Angeles to shoot the band for a cover article in early 1987 (The interview was released in June 1987). This interview took place at Rumbo Studios where the band was recording for their debut record.

The press comes out first in L.A. if you’re an L.A. band, and then (?) London picks up on it quickly. That’s why […] quickly Kerrang discovered us, found out about us. And they were really into us and the kids found out about us. And then, as soon as we were able to go over there we did, and that’s why we became more happening over there than in other parts of the country [MTV Japan, November 1987].
Six months after the release of the EP, in June 1987, and still without having released their debut record, the band travelled to London for three shows at the Marquee on June 19, 22 and 28.

[...] Alan [Niven] came to us and announced, "You all gotta get passports, we're going to England" [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 124].
Duff would describe the trip to England:

At first, we wanted to sleep on the plane. So someone gave us half of a J&B Magnum as a sleeping pill. Whiskey is a big emotion [or commotion?] stirrer among the band. Slash, our guitarist, thought that he was at a party, and wanted to leave through the escape hatch! And another one nearly started a fire by throwing a cigarette behind a seat. The captain of the 747 reprimanded us, and the cops were waiting for us in England, but, thankfully, our manager got it all settled.. [Hard Rock Magazine, October 1987].
Originally this was intended as only one gig, but the first show sold out quickly, so another was added, and a third. According to Steven Adler, the last gig was added while the band was taking the ferry across to Amsterdam [Steven's autobiography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, p128].

At least parts of the Marquee shows were taped "on a mobile unit by British producer Vic Maile" [Kerrang! March 1989]. Songs off this recording would variously be used as B-sides on the band's singles, including 'Whole Lotta Rosie' which was the B-side on the band's first single, 'Welcome to the Jungle' after being mixed by Mike Clink.

The first show on June 19 was not met with good reviews. Andy Hurt, writing for The Sounds, likened Axl's singing to "If a six foot-tall hamster masquerading as a GI had the misfortune to be captured by the Vietcong and subjected to the dastardliest of tweaks and prods, it should emit noises similar to those made by Axl. His voice is the voice of Bon Scott with one terrified bollock stuck on the plane, too petrified to take the freefall into the scrotum below" [Sounds Magazine, June 27, 1987].

According to Classic Rock Magazine, Axl, after having read read the devastating review, "was livid and led the whole band to the Sound's office in Mornington Crescent, north London. 'Andy Hurt?' he raged. 'He fucking will be if I find him!' But the reviewer was absent, so Axl contended himself with a warning note left with another member of the staff" [Classic Rock Magazine, July 2007].

Steve Sutherland, likely writing for NME, also gave the show a poor review and described the sound of the band as "weak AC/DC." Again, Axl decided to confront the reviewer as Sutherland would recall in 2005:

"I received a phonecall from the singer, Axl Rose. He said the band were on the way to the airport in a cab and he wondered if I’d be in the office so they could swing right by and FUCKING SORT ME OUT!! Needless to say, I had a pressing engagement elsewhere but I had to admire their balls" [NME, September 2005].

Axl also referenced the "weak AC/DC" description when introducing 'Whole Lotta Rosie' on one of the next gigs.

The two following shows did a lot better.

Playing in London was the first experience Guns N' Roses would have with touring abroad and being celebrity rock stars.

Bars close too early, they drive on the wrong side of the street, they talk funny. […] We got thrown out of a few clubs [Endless Party Magazine, August 1987.
Great hash [Endless Party Magazine, August 1987.
It was insane. We got there having really no idea what the response [would be], because our EP’s did really well over there – before the album. And we get there, and we go to the soundcheck the first night – it’s, like, 3:00 in the afternoon, actually – and there’s a line of kids, two blocks down, all knowing who we were, and we were going on and off [Musique Plus, August 1987].
So we had to have our security guards, right? I mean, for us it’s like, we just hang out. We don’t need security people, we’re not used to that, right? […] Anyway, so we go out and we go to hang out in London, right? And it’s like, all these kids are coming up and they’re asking for autographs, and they want their asses signed, and their chest signed... […] And I’m like, whooa! [Musique Plus, August 1987].
The band was also building a rumor as notorious troublemakers and the media would report that they were "kicked out from three of the most famous clubs in England," they "they smashed a shop window after they were refused entry" and that they "threw various objects through the window of the hotel that accommodated them" [Hard Rock Magazine, October 1987]. Additionally, Axl while in the company of Niven and Zutaut allegedly had an altercation with a security guard at Tower Record resulting in police being called for. Axl would describe this:

I wanted to break everything in there. I’d gladly drive one of these English cabs through their showcase! It’s very hard to keep your cool in this kind of situations [Hard Rock Magazine, October 1987].
In the aftermath Tower Records would apologize to Axl and send him jacket with the store's logo [Hard Rock Magazine, October 1987].

One of the clubs they visited in London was the legendary Limelight (the band would later play an acoustic gig at its sister club in New York on January 31, 1988). At this club it was reported that Slash got in a fight with Cobalt Stargazer, the singer of Zodiac Mindwarp, when he hit on his girlfriend, but Duff would later claim it was just exaggerated in the press (Endless Party Magazine, August 1987). They would also party with Lemmy from Motorhead [Endless Party Magazine, August 1987].

At soundcheck before the first show on June 19, 1987, the band tried 'Knockin' On Heaven's Door' for the first time, and debuted it on the first show at the Marquee. The shows themselves were a success and the band appreciated their popularity.

The gigs were great. We played three gigs at the Marquee and they were all sold out. Kids line up at three in the afternoon, like two streets down. We'd walk up and all these kids knew who we were just by sight. There's really no rock n' roll over there, so we got there and the kids were just waiting and waiting. All the old Hanoi Rocks fans. There's the fans there, but there's just no bands. The kids are looking for a band they can all cling on to [Endless Party Magazine, August 1987.


Last edited by Soulmonster on Thu 4 Jul 2019 - 19:00; edited 2 times in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 18:45

AXL: THE KILLER OF SMALL DOGS


According to Hard Rock Magazine, the Royal Society for Protection of Animals (RSPA) in the UK had tried to force the cancellation of the three June 1987 gigs at the Marquee after reading the June 1987 issue of Time Out Magazine where Axl is quoted as saying that he would like to kill all small dogs.

According to the Hard Rock Magazine (a French magazine), Axl had arrived for the Time Out Magazine interview in a bad mood after hearing that his two Maltese dogs had made a mess in his apartment in Los Angeles, causing an emphatic outburst against smaller dogs. No one in the room, according to Hard Rock Magazine, except the Time Out Magazine interviewer, had taken this outburst seriously [Hard Rock Magazine, October 1987].

Axl would later talk about how the rumors had spread that he hated smaller dogs:

Talking about his dog, Torque: That's the famous dog they said I'd go murdering[...] I don't like poodles. Little poodles. I told some guys everything about poodles makes you want to kill them so the next thing you know there's this magazine in England, and it wasn't even a rock magazine, it was like a magazine that talks [?] about all kinds of things in the world and stuff and it talks about this band in L.A. where this guy's a self-confessed poodle murderer. So then they have like the National Enquirer type papers over there, you know, that sadly started all this stuff, and all those things came out calling me a dog butcher and that I was beastier than Beastie Boys [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1987].

The band would later grow more and more frustrated with the media, especially in the early 90s.
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 18:48

1987 - CANCELLED TOURS


The label and band was scrambling to get the band out on the road to support the soon-to-be released debut album.

Playing with all these bands that we’ve listened to for years. Getting an opportunity to play with people who we respect. To go out there and to kick as much ass as we can! [Concert Shots, May 1986].
We’re looking for a tour bus. A big, black tour bus with a skull on the front and a harem inside, like an opium den [Rock Scene, September 1987].
I’d love to tour with AC/DC, Aerosmith, or Motley Crue [Metal Edge, March 1987].

But landing the right tours proved difficult. The band was gaining a very bad reputation, NME would later state it was due "because of their problems with the LA Police [New Musical Express, August 1989]. In addition, Appetite was either not released or initially not selling very well.

According to Steven in his biography, the first plans were to do a tour with Stryper or with Y&T, but these all fell apart [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 130].

An early 1987 tour with Iron Maiden was also allegedly in the works, but cancelled due to Axl's reputation [Hit Parader, October 1988], although the band would tour with Iron Maiden later in 1987.

They were supposed to open for Motley Crue from the beginning of their "Girls, Girls, Girls" tour from June 1987, but since 'Appetite' wasn't out yet, Motley went with Whitesnake instead [CGBG's Post-show Interview, October 1987]. Whitesnake would later drop out of this tour, and Guns N' Roses would step in in November 1989.

They also said a planned a European tour with Aerosmith in September 1987 that fell apart in "the 11th hour" [Kerrang! March 1989], allegedly because Aerosmith hadn't got their new record out [Endless Party Magazine, August 1987] or due to "finances" [Kerrang! October 1987]. This record was Permanent Vacation and it was released on August 21, 1987, so it doesn't make entire sense timing-wise. Aerosmith would tour this album in 1988 and Guns N' Roses would join them in July-September for that tour.


Last edited by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 18:51; edited 1 time in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 18:49

JULY 1987 - THE DEATH OF TODD CREW


As mentioned before, Todd Crew was a great fan and friend of Guns N' Roses and played with GN'R members in the Drunk Fux.

Todd had been part of the band's inner circle from the beginning. He was a shit-kicking, hard-drinking, exceptionally cool guy. He played bass in another band called Jetboy that originated in San Francisco. When they kicked Todd out of Jetboy, we were the first band to tell them, "Screw you, you're done as far as we're concerned. You're never gonna do shows with us" [[Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 119]]
After returning from their successful stint in England in June 1987, the band had about a month to kill before they would tour North America opening for The Cult. Todd was intended to stay with the band during the tour as Duff's bass tech.

In July Slash flew to New York City to meet with merchandising companies, and Todd Crew came with him. In Steven's biography he mistakenly claims that this happened when Slash flew to New York City for mixing Appetite, months earlier.

During their stay in New York, on July 18, 1987, three days before the release of Appetite for Discussion, Todd overdosed on heroin and died.

I don't know what happened exactly, because I wasn't there. I heard that he and Slash were partying, shooting heroin, and Todd passed out. Slash and Todd must have gotten separated at some point and Todd overdosed and died. [...] The band had friends who were so close, so devoted, that we considered them to be members of GNR who merely didn't appear onstage. Todd was one of these, and I truly felt I had lost a brother [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 119]
[Todd] died in a hotel room in New York a while back. We'd copped some stuff and he got it right there. I tried to bring him back... and he was like my best, best friend [Musician, December 1988].
The band was later to regularly dedicate live performances of 'Knockin' On Heaven's Door' to Todd's memory.

Now, if you have known of us, then you know that we recently, a couple of months ago, lost a friend of ours. A little over a month ago, I OD’ed, and I ended up in a hospital called Cedars-Sinai. I was in a coma for about two days. When I got out of the hospital, the first person I saw was a guy named Todd Crew. Todd used to be in a band called Jetboy, and one of the reasons he got kicked out – Jetboy sucks. One of the reasons he got kicked out, was for hanging out with us. I think we were more friends than the people he knew all of his fucking life. When I got out of the hospital, the first person I saw was Todd, and I really didn’t wanna see anybody I knew, because I didn’t know if I had any friends left. Todd came up to me, and gave me a hug and said, “You can’t do this to the family, man.” Two weeks later, Todd OD’ed here in New York. We tried doing this song without dedicating it to Todd, and every time we feel too fuckin’ guilty and we end up doing it anyway. And a friend told me that we won’t get over it till it happens again. So until then, this is for Todd. And this is “Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door.” [Onstage at The Ritz, NY, USA, October 23, 1987]
In 1989 Axl would be asked what his greatest regret is:

That I didn't talk to Todd Crew before he went to New York. I felt a massive need to talk to him out of concern for his well-being. But I wasn't aware enough to realize I didn't have the time I thought I did. I thought I'd have time later... [Rolling Stone, August 1989].


Last edited by Soulmonster on Fri 28 Jun 2019 - 10:03; edited 2 times in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 18:53

JULY 21, 1987 - THE RELEASE OF 'APPETITE FOR DESTRUCTION'


People are fed up with a lot of things. This is a good release. It’s refreshing to see something straightforward [Edmonton Journal, August 25, 1987].
[…] we're very proud of it. It's rock as you've rarely heard it before. We had a lot of opportunities to test these songs live and we saw how the audience reacted. This album is killer [Unknown French Publication, June 1987].
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Appetite for Destruction was released in the USA on July 21, 1987.

We got hold of everybody who was anybody n our lives to get together at the Hell House for the "unofficial world premiere." It was to be our first listen to our new album. [...] Slash and I hugged; we were so happy. We listened to both sides, pretty much saying, "Oh yeah, that's working, that sounds cool," throughout. [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 121]
According to Steven's biography, his happiness with hearing the final result was not subdued by the fact that Slash had changed a drum part on 'Paradise City' in postproduction [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 121].

The band had settled on 'Appetite for Destruction' as the name of the record, which was also the name of the chosen artwork for the cover:

[Welcome to the Jungle] was gonna be the title of the record until the title of the original painting was Appetite For Destruction, and we really liked it, cause I break everything around me anyway. That was the title of the Robert Williams painting. He named it. We ended up deciding we really liked it, so we just went with it [Rock Scene, June 1988].
When asked what the title means:

In my opinion, the way the title will be interpreted will be revealing about each one’s personality [Unknown French Publication, June 1987].
Being asked if there was anything they would have changed with the record if they could:

No, the only thing I would like to do is I wish we would have more time to mix but we were working on a release date. There were a couple of songs where I feel we didn't have the time to get just right. 'Paradise City' I think could have been a little clearer. But, you know, we were making two songs per day to make the release date, you know, and there were all kinds of reasons why we had to make that release date, like getting the record out before [?] down in the month of August, and things like that. There was all kinds of reasons why we had a certain amount of time that we have it get it done. So we just did the best we could in that amount of time, we didn't really compromise, you know, we still, I think, hit pretty close to the mount [?] we wanted to hit. There isn't really anything we want to change. There's two words in that whole record that I didn't quite say the way I wanted to, and I forgot which ones they were, didn't have time to go back to find them and redo them. And they are not out of key, so no one else knows it. I am the only one who personally knows it [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1987].
Artistically, with the album, I got exactly what I wanted. I wish we would’ve had a little bit more time to do some mixing. The guys were mixing our record, and one of them had heart problems and had to go to the hospital, which knocked off three days [L.A. Weekly, June 1988].
It doesn’t matter, it’s like there’s little things here and there, where you know you would have liked it a bit different, but it doesn’t matter cause it’s done. It’s there, and you might as well like it cause if you don’t you can put yourself into an early grave worrying about something that you can’t do shit about [Rock Scene, August 1988].
In March or April 1989, Slash would on the contrary claim their "first album wasn't all that good, I don't think" [Kerrang! April 1989]. Later on Slash would also indicate that the label had convinced them to discard some material for 'Appetite':

[Geffen] were pretty scared about the whole thing and they were just basically trying to get it done, so we gave up certain amount of material that we really wanted to do [MTV, September 1991].
In June 1988, Axl was asked if the record would have turned out differently if they had produced it themselves:

There may have been a different track or two just because we're working with other people, and when you're working with other people they have their input on which tracks are the best, and stuff like that. It didn't really bother us, not a whole lot. If we had more time, I think we might have gotten a bit more of a better mix.

Actually, the record's pretty much co-produced, but we got a really good deal from our producer since he wanted to break into producing, and get credits for producing. If we gave him full credit on the record, it would help him a lot in the business. But especially Izzy, Slash, and myself were there every step of the way, so it was pretty much co-produced. We were in on the mixing and stuff, and usually the guys who mix the records never have anybody in the studio when they do that. We were there the whole time
[Rock Scene, June 1988].
And Slash was asked in September 1988 to describe his and Izzy's playing styles on the record:

The funny thing about Izzy and I is that we each play what we want, and sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. It can be frustrating for me because he's very stubborn. He plays very lightweight, sort of Keith Richards style, whereas if I want a heavy riff, I'll want a heavy riff, I'll want us both to play it to make it really stick out. There's a lot of songs on our album I'm really not happy with that way: 'Welcome to the Jungle,' for instance. Sometimes Duff will beef it up, like the riff in 'Paradise City.' I'm a little more knowledgeable on guitar; Izzy's a good songwriter with a great sense of style [Musician, December 1988].
Looking back at the record:

When I hear it, it sounds a little bit immature to me, in some ways. It just sounds as old as it is. It's cool. There's nothing wrong with it. I'm still proud of it because even though it's years ago, there's nothing on it that I don't like. I still think the playing on there and the attack were really cool. There's certain things in the mix on certain songs, like in "Jungle," where it wasn't heavy enough for me. I think about that. As far as the experience goes, the only nightmare that I can remember from Appetite was trying to count in that "Sweet Child O' Mine" riff (laughs) [Guitar for the Practising Musician, November 1992].
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 18:55

APPETITE FOR DESTRUCTION - ARTWORK CONTROVERSY


The original artwork, a painting by the artist Robert Williams, proved to be controversial. Open for interpretation, it is by most people thought to depict an avenging monster about to attack a robot that has molested a woman.

Axl was the one who found the painting and suggested it as the album cover:

[Robert Williams]'s like a major underground comic's artist, and paints like one oil painting the size of a window a week! That painting was actually the size of a wall and sold in 1978 for like $10,000 and we leased it from him. But I found it on the cover of a book that he had put out, in a place called the Soap Plant in L.A. I found it and I thought "Wow, that is an intense picture, man." I'd never seen anything like it, and then I went back to buy it and it was gone.

Then I found it on a postcard, submitted it as a joke, and everybody liked it. I wanted it as the cover, but I thought we could never use it even though it was so intense. I just wanted to show everybody, and we all decided to use it. It was really weird that I found it on the cover of a book to begin with, because it's something that's out of print and it's a collector's item, and the Soap Plant shouldn't have had it to begin with. It goes for like $7,500 bucks now, and it was $11 dollars when I found it! When I met the artist and told him where I had found the book, he said it was impossible. So, it was really kinda like a coincidence that we found it. I think it was meant to be, cause even though it's been banned a lot of places, and Warner Brothers refused to print it, so we had to get an outside printer, but now they stockpile it in their warehouse because they get so many demands for it. Where at the time they were gonna make just a few, now and then. I feel that we've got this piece of art work, and some people just go "Wow, gnarly cover," but I think there's a lot of people out there that can really appreciate the artwork of it, and that's what I wanted to show them
[Rock Scene, June 1988].
How it came about, it was a joke. Axl brought this postcard with that art by this painter, Robert Williams. And we didn’t really want a hassle over our album cover. It wasn’t, like, we wanted to get our picture on the cover of the album just so you can see yourself on the cover. We just don’t want a hassle over it. So, it’s like, okay, we’re all laughing, you know? Fine, record cover, let’s go; let’s get it over with. And, personally – I mean, myself, I don’t think any of us saw anything wrong with it [Much Music, May 1988].
The band would defend the choice of artwork:

We didn't put that out to outrage people. I thought it was a very cool piece of art that would stand the test of time. I don't think it was encouraging sexual abuse at all. I think it's an idea in people's heads that she is attractive, a sexual fantasy. Like, this poor girl got abused and you're thinking about how your husband wants to fuck her so you're upset. People get scared of their own thoughts [Musician, December 1988].
There was really no significant reasons, you know, except for that it was a cool painting. You know, there was no discriminatory thing with that, you know, as far as women are concerned, you know, and anything like that. It was just a painting that looked really cool, it looked really dynamic, and it was, like, who wanted to sit for two hours and think about what was gonna be the cover. And we saw the picture, “Oh, that’s fine, yeah, sure - let’s use that”. (Laughs). And then there’s this line “Appetite for Destruction” on the bottom. And we said, “We don’t have to think about the title, either! [?] It’s perfect [Super Channel, October 1987].
Not to sound stupid or naive or whatever, or close-minded, we didn’t see any rape thing going on. It was, like, exactly what he said. It was a robot vendor getting robbed and she got knocked against the fence, you know? He couldn’t have just...[…] I mean, if you think we’re generally promoting rape - for someone seeing it like that, I could easily get on you for seeing it as a rape. You know, prove it was rape. Why do you think it was rape? [Much Music, May 1988].
I think that since it was such an outrageous picture, that, like, the skill and the talent involved in making it gets overlooked. And I wanted to be a part of, like, showing people, 'No, this is art' [MTV, November 1988].

But many people saw it differently and would accuse Guns N' Roses for being sexist and promoting rape:

There was a picture of a young woman lying on the ground obviously about to get raped by a robot. And just above, there's a hand which is about to crunch the robot up. That doesn't mean anything special. We liked the picture, that's all. But everyone came down on us and accused us of glorifying rape [New Musical Express, April 1989].
Robert Williams himself, would describe the painting this way: "Let me explain the painting to you. It has a red monster in it. The red monster is jumping over the fence. It is killing the robot, because the robot, in some way, violated the female vendor of small toy robots. […] What we’ve got here, is we’ve got an example of music and art merging. This album cover was not a commissioned commercial job to go on the record and in the music. This was a separate piece of art from an earlier period. We’re dealing with culture. Music and art, two things that ran together with mutual interest" [MTV, November 1988].

Warner Brothers was Guns N' Roses' parent label and they allegedly sent angry letters to have the cover replaced [Spin, May 1988].

[…] we got a few letters [Endless Party Magazine, August 1987].
We got some complaints from people, organizations, as well as David Geffen [Endless Party Magazine, August 1987].
Because of this, the Robert Williams artwork was removed to the inner sleeve and replaced with Axl's cross tattoo.

Big deal. We liked the artwork, but it wasn't something that we felt so strongly about that we'd die for it. After the first few thousand copies, it was changed to our logo [Circus Magazine, May 1989].
Only 30,000 copies with the original artwork was produced [Endless Party Magazine, August 1987].

But hiding the controversial artwork in the inner sleeve was not good enough, though, and in October 1988 MTV would report that stores selling the record were picketed by people protesting against the "pro-rape" and "sexist" inner sleeve [MTV, October 1988], resulting in some stores refusing to sell the record [Rolling Stone, November 1988]. And in 1989, Circus Magazine would report that "New Iberia, Louisiana recently passed an emergency ordinance that would subject any retailers who display the album to both jail time and a fine. At press time, the town council was trying to make it a state-wide ordinance" [Circus Magazine, May 1989].

The band was incredulous to the controversy:

I can’t believe everyone made such a big deal out of a postcard [Spin, May 1988].
It had a picture of this chick flashin’ her panties at you. […] The next album should have someone giving the finger on it [Rock City News, January 1988].
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 18:57

AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 1987 - OPENING FOR 'THE CULT'


In early August 1987 the band did a video shoot for their upcoming music video for 'Welcome to the Jungle' on August 2 at the Park Plaza Hotel Ballroom in Los Angeles.

Despite the problems getting tours, the band started their first proper tour in August 1987, opening for the Cult across Canada and USA.

Do you know how we got this tour? Because Ian Astbury, the Cult's lead vocalist, came to our first show at the Marquee, the one we got such a slagging for, and liked it so much he offered us the tour. So f**k those journalists who wrote those bad things, Ian Astbury liked what he saw, right? [Kerrang! October 1987].
The first show was in Halifax, Canada, August 14, 1987. On crossing the border to Canada, Axl was arrested for trying to bring in a stun gun, allegedly the only time in 1987 he was arrested [Spin, January 1988].

The best show of the tour, according to Izzy on August 25, would take place in Montreal on August 17, 1987:

The best show so far was... in Montreal. The people were just great. To have that response from people who’ve never heard of us, the album has just come out, it’s great[Edmonton Journal, August 25, 1987].
For their August 29 show at the Coliseum Theatre Stage in Vancouver, the press would claim the band would be "the first band to play Vancouver whose contract calls for the promoter to supply condoms (multi-colored)" [Province, September 18, 1987].

They would tour with the Cult until September 1987. Despite having just released Appetite for Destruction in the US, they band was given no airtime on MTV and no one knew who they were. It didn't help that the Canadian release data was 6 weeks after the US release date. For most shows they played for a small audience who were waiting for the main act.

Despite this, the band thoroughly enjoyed playing with the Cult and would praise how well they were treated by the headlining act. According to Kerrang!, Ian even "dashed out to get Duff a ripped black T-shirt to use as a headband" at one point [Kerrang! October 1987].

The Cult is great. I really like the direction their music is moving in and, as people, they’re so cool to us on the road. Hell, they even give us a sound check before the show. It makes the whole tour a helluva lot of fun [Calgary Herald, August 21, 1987].
The Cult are the first band we've met who really have treated us right. […] We've been having a great time with the Cult, and Ian seems to spend more time in our dressing room than his own [Kerrang! October 1987].
The Cult and GNR got along phenomenally well, and we had a great time together. They always had catering at sound check, great food that positively spoiled us. During our set, Axl made it a point to announce to the crowd how great the Cult was to us [Steven's biography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, page 131].
It was a good tour for us. Both bands got on real well together, and they were nicer to us than most headlining bands are expected to be. It was a good start [Kerrang! March 1989].
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 19:02

'APPETITE FOR DESTRUCTION'- LYRICAL CONTENT CONTROVERSY


We were signed by the same guy who originally signed Motley Crue to Elektra. And he told us to keep all the vulgar stuff in [The San Francisco Chronicle, August 30, 1987].
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

In addition to the controversy surrounding the choice of cover art for 'Appetite', the record had to have a warning sticker due to its mature lyrical content and swearing.

The sticker, the sticker are pointless. The sticker means nothing either way. And if I don't say the word 'fuck', or whatever, on the next record that is just because it wasn't put in that song. You know, it's nothing to do with… we don't write songs based on trying to get sales or anything else, we just write songs on how we feel and how we're writing that particular song. […] I would have said exactly what it says and everything on a big list, "This album contains the word 'fuck' at least 27 times" [Interview after Lakeland show, November 24, 1987].
The PMRC can't win - if there are warning stickers on albums, it's only going to sell more records. The whole rebellion thing is what makes everything so great. It keeps the wheels turning [Goldmine Magazine, May 1989].

The sticker would also be attached to the 1991 'Use Your Illusion' albums, and now Axl was a litte bit more critical:

The only drawback we've had is due to Tipper Gore, and her work to have stickers placed on albums. That really hindered us, I believe. […] Her efforts really hurt our sales in the States. The whole stickering thing took its effect because major record chains like K-Mart and Walmart, which are 50 percent of a band's sales, won't even carry our albums. You've got to realize that certain income families don't let their kids shop just anywhere. When I was growing up, we were a K-Mart family, so I speak from experience. You could look wherever you wanted, but you bought things at K-Mart because it's a little cheaper. I think the fact that Tipper Gore is closer to power is something that we'll have to deal with. I think the Gores toned down their act in order to get the vote, but I haven't forgotten what she's done. She did achieve her goal-first albums had to be stickered, then stores wouldn't carry stickered albums [Hit Parader, June 1993].


Last edited by Soulmonster on Tue 16 Jul 2019 - 14:42; edited 3 times in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 19:08

SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1987 - HEADLINING IN EUROPE AND USA


After touring with the Cult, the band had planned to open for Aerosmith in Europe, but they pulled out in the "11th hour" [Kerrang! March 1989] allegedly because Aerosmith hadn't got their new record out [Endless Party Magazine, August 1987] or due to "finances" [Kerrang! October 1987]. Instead of scrapping the plans altogether, they decided to headline with Faster Pussycats as their opener. The band thus went to Germany, Holland and UK as headlining acts from September 29 to October 8, 1987.

At the start of this tour Axl's voice was in a bad shape and the band was starting to feel exhausted:

[...] Axl's voice is getting to the point where he can't keep going. Everybody's been having a good time. The thing is, we're burned out[Musician, December 1988].
After having played two shows in West Germany and one show in the Netherlands, the band travelled to England for five shows. Axl looked forward to re-visiting England after having been there for the three concerts at the Marquee in June earlier that year:

We are looking forward to this so much. It's a chance to get out around the country and visit some of the places that fans travelled from to see us at the Marquee [in June earlier that year]. We had a blast in London earlier this year and I'm sure this tour will go extremely well [Kerrang! October 1987].
During their October 5 show at the Rock City in Nottingham, England, Axl was refused entry to the show when he came alone dressed in nothing but a bathrobe. Apparently, he had locked himself out of the tour bus and had to return with his security pass to be allowed into the venue [BBC, December 2015].

In particular, their October 7 show at the Bristol Colston Hall in in Bristol went well:

Last night, in Bristol, it was fantastic, people wanted to jump from the stands, and many of them ended up dancing on the PA. I don’t believe there’s any band that’s not able to lift the spirits of the people in Bristol. When we play at Hammersmith, I’ll ask people to see if there’s no other crowd as good as in Bristol – even though I may get into trouble if I encourage people to go too wild[Popular 1, April 1988 (interview from October 8, 1987; translated from Spanish)].
Bristol Colston Hall were full of slammers and stage-divers and people jumping off the balconies, jumping off amplifiers [Interview with Axl Rose, December 1987].

But after the tour, Slash would not be too positive about the five UK shows they did:

When [the next LP] comes out, we're all very adamant about going to England first to tour... It seems like out of everywhere we've played we've sort of, like, cut England short. We haven't given it, I dont think, enough of our time. I mean, we did a tour in England with Faster Pussycat, and there were a couple shows that were great, bit the whole tour itself was sort of half-assed. It was only five shows and I don't think we gave enough in a lot of those shows... [Kerrang! April 1989].
Axl would echo the statement of wanting to do more shows in England:

We miss England. We miss England. Japan was great, we miss England. I hope that when we will do our next tour we can plan out something really big and do it right for your [?]. We had a lot of fun when we did our last tour over there and we would like to make it a lot more special next time [Unknown Source, April 1989].
After returning to US, they toured the East Coast (October 16, November 1, 1987), supported by EZO who were also on Geffen Records which, according to Axl, "made it really easy just to do quickly" [Rock City News, January 1988].

The third show on this tour took place at a place called Hammerjacks in Baltimore, MD, USA on October 18. Apparently, Izzy got so wasted the band had to turn his amp down:

Izzy—he’s not usually the one to cause any trouble at all, but he got totally annihilated at this place called Hammerjacks—the most fucked place I’ve ever played. First, they got about thirty [uniformed] security guys that look like West Hollywood sheriffs. And Izzy got in arguments with them early in the day about some bullshit they were giving our crew, who were just trying to do their jobs. So Izzy got drunk, and was really hating this club. Then, right before we played, and there are more hassles, and Izzy’s fucking sick of everything, he walked into the club manager’s office and just whipped it out and pissed all over the guy’s desk—with the guy sitting there! It just blew their minds. Then we go on, and Izzy is so drunk we had to turn his guitar down, and when he realized what was going on, he unstrapped the guitar and threw it into the crowd [Original source unknown, but found in Watch You Bleed: The Saga of Guns N’ Roses by Stephen Davis, Penguin Group, 2008].
Slash would mention this gig in 1995:

I remember playing there. Hammer-jacks is the gig — I don’t know if you should print this or not — but it was the gig where... […] Me and Izzy got really messed up. When you're touring around in a bus, you get there in the morning, you have a day room at the hotel, you go to the gig way too early... and you get bored. […] I play well when I’m messed up. Izzy, on the other hand.... [laughter] So during the gig, he just sat on his amp. But he had a Marshall stack behind him, so he sat on the tiny lip of the bottom cabinet, and we just sorta covered for him. [...] I think he was pretty much turned off at that point [laughter] [The Baltimore Sun, April 9, 1995].
During this touring Axl was still "fighting a see-saw battle with a tenacious case of laryngitis" [BAM, November 1987]. Slash also fell out of the tour bus in October when travelling in upstate New York:

Slash fell against me and I fell out of the chair straight to the ground, about five feet. Concussion time. Knocked out. They thought I was dead [BAM, November 1987].
Some memorable shows during this period of touring Appetite for Destruction, was at the Hammersmith Odeon in London (October 8) which according to Mick Wall was a fantastic show [Kerrang! March 1989]; at The Ritz in New York City (October 23) where Dave Mustaine was thrown off the stage when he wandered on with a guitar in his hands ("We didn't know who he was. We just thought it was some weirdo out of the crowd" [Kerrang! March 1989]); and at CBGB in New York City (October 30, 1987) where the band debuted 'Patience'.

Next up was a show as CBGB, the famous punk rock club in Manhattan. Duff was particularly excited because his heroes Iggy Pop and the Ramones had played there. A lot of my favourites like Blondie and Talking Heads has started out there too. When we got there, I said, "Are you sure this is CBGB?" It was the smallest room, very, very intimate. It held only like fifty to seventy people. I just couldn't imagine that all those famous bands had played there. We performed an acoustic set and I rocked the tambourine. We debuted some songs that we hand't played publicly yet. The lyrics "I used to love her...but I had to kill her" from "Used to Love Her" got a huge laugh. And "Patience" got a very nice response. We also played "Mr. Brownstone" and "Move to the City". Someone yelled out, "Drum solo!" so I shook the tambourine wildly. Everyone laughed [Steve's autobiography, "My Appetite for Destruction", 2010, p. 145]
After the CGBG show Axl would talk about an incident that happened at the Gramercy Hotel in New York:

We stay at the Gramercy hotel here [in New York], and one of our friends, West Arkeen, the guy jumped over the counter. His dad had a heart attack and they didn’t give him the message, and then when he yelled at the guy, the guy jumped over the counter and hit him. And then three guys jumped in - it was at the hotel here in New York. So then he came up and got me. I went downstairs and two big guys come with a club. So I grabbed a huge metal sign, you know, and it was like a showdown, they backed off. And then the cops came and, you know. That’s, like, the most recent thing that’s happened [After show interview at CBGB's, NY, October 30, 1987].


Last edited by Soulmonster on Fri 28 Jun 2019 - 14:08; edited 3 times in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 19:11

THE BUSINESS SIDE OF THINGS


When the band started out they did everything themselves. Luckily, when it came to their own career and making it as musicians, the band was tenacious and driven.

The band happened top be pretty street smart and we always managed to take care of ourselves and all that crap. At the same time, there was an amount of naivete going into the whole thing. I mean, we were hip tp not getting screwed and all that stuff. We weren't going to be taken advantage of. But at the same time we had no idea where we were headed. Basically, the rule of the game was to make as much money as possible and not get screwed out of percentage. […] the amount of time I put into [guitar playing] was the same amount of time I put into the band. I would put in 12-18 hours a day[Scene Magazine, April 1988].
Slash designed most of the band's artwork [ref?] and would design the band's first t-shirt [Circus Magazine, May 1988].

I'm very business-oriented when it comes to knowing what all the figures mean and making sure we don't get ripped off[Kerrang! December 1988].
Later, as the band grew in popularity, they would argue that they were picking up on the business side of it:

We learned how to survive. We learned who's who in the music business. We learned how to tell when someone's full of shit. We've learned some hard lessons and had to pay some out-of-court settlements. At least we're smart enough to talk straight business now. If someone in this band is like, 'Okay, we're up against a wall' we have people - lawyers, other lawyers and other accountants - so that any mess we manage to get into, we can get out of [RIP, April 1989].
What I'd tell any kid in high school is "Take business classes." I don't care what else you're gonna do, if you're gonna do art or anything, take business classes. You can say, "Well, I don't want to get commercial," but if you do anything to make any money, you're doing something commercial. You can be flipping hamburgers at McDonald's, but you're a commercial burger flipper [Rolling Stone, August 1989].
Robert John: "as far as business goes, these guys really know what they're doing" [Rock Scene, October 1989].

Izzy and I had always done a lot of reading on Alice Cooper. Not only because we admired him, but also because we figured that anyone who could get this act off the ground had to be a genius ­and that would be his manager (Shep Gordon). So we'd always read as much as we could about Shep, and we met Shep in Long Beach that night [February 26, 1988], and we told him about how we'd read about him. And he said, "Yeah? Well, that's great, man, because I always used to go in and pull out my book on Elvis when we were first starting out." He told us that Elvis had in his contract that when he put out a record, every piece of RCA stationery must have the title of his new record on it, no matter which act it was promoting. Shep wanted to do that, and the record company said it couldn't be done - and Shep got his Elvis book and said "It's right here on page 42" [Cream, Septembert 1989].


Last edited by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 20:06; edited 1 time in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 20:05

NOVEMBER 3-29 1987 - OPENING FOR MÖTLEY CRÜE


After having played individual shows headlining around the US, the band opened for Mötley Crue on parts of their "Girls, Girls, Girls" tour in the US (November 3-29, 1987), something Izzy had been looking forward to [Concert Shots, May 1986]. Originally, Guns N' Roses was supposed to open from the start of the tour (The "Girls, Girls, Girls" tour started on June 19), but since 'Appetite' wasn't out yet Whitesnake got the job:

Well, we were gonna do it on the original beginning of their tour, but we weren’t ready. Our album hadn’t been put out yet. And so they got Whitesnake and they were real happy with that. But now Whitesnake is ready to start headlining on their own, and they like us and we like them, so it’s like, we’re ready to do it [CGBG's Post-Show Interview, October 1989].
So in November Whitesnake dropped out to headline their own tour and Guns N' Roses stepped in [Kerrang! March 1989].

Axl was excited about opening for Motley Crue and grateful for the how accommodating the headliner was:

They’re like, they’re rolling out, like, the red carpet. I mean, they’re giving us more lights than they usually give an opening act. They’re giving us more monitors and more things. […] They’re like, they’re really helping us, because they’re into what we’re doing. And like, someone told me the other day, Circus Magazine told me that Vince Neil said some nice things about us (?). I figure that any kid that has the Guns N’ Roses album has a Motley Crue album too, so it should be great [CGBG's Post-Show Interview, October 1989].
The Crue tour was a much bigger show then what the band was used to by then, and, according to Axl, the band "learned a lot about professionalism from that. Fuckin’ a lot" [Rock City News, January 1988]. The band also learnt a lot about partying and wild living:

Talkin' of sick. Y'now Motley Crue? Sick fuckin' guys, man! Real sick fucks, those guys! […] You wouldn't have believed these guys. Like they're doin' an ounce of cocaine each a fuckin' day. These guys are walkin' into fuckin' walls, man. And they're doing this shit... Y'know, havin' this chick tied to the bed and stuff. And they tried to get us into that shit too, just to fuck us up, right. Which is what happened. I mean, can you believe... These guys gave fuckin' Stevie fuckin' Ajax to snort all fuckin' night. Fucked him up. You don't pull that kinda shit on another musician! [The Face, October 1989].
Obviously, this was a raucous period of the band. Doug Goldstein, who was the tour manager at the time, would say "These guys are nuts. I mean, they keep me hopping, all the time. I'm getting about two hours sleep a-night. […] They are the craziest guys I ever worked for. […] I have to make sure that I always have enough alcohol. It doesn't matter if it's 8 am or when" [Interview after Lakeland show, November 24, 1987]. Slash would concur:

That was the craziest tour we'd ever been on [Kerrang! March 1989].
One incident happened when Slash and Nikki Sixx were wrestling, resulting in neck injury for Slash:

[…] Nikki Sixx fell on me when we were wrestling one night, and I dislocated three of the vertebrae in my neck, and I had to go onstage. So I was in agony and still had to play […] [Goldmine Magazine, May 1989].
But all in all, the band was happy about the tour and their increased popularity:

And then we went out with Mötley and that was that was pretty insane, you know, 'cause like any night that we did two nights in a row, the first night, you know, we got them going, but if we did two nights in a row when we came back to the second night they were like, "Whoa, now we know who these guys are. The first time people see us, a lot of times unless they've really heard us and are into us, they are more into watching and checking us out and watching every little thing. But by the time you do a second night they lose their minds. They're like, "Yeah, now I can let myself go. It's it's cool to act like I like these guys" [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1987].
Then we went out with Motley Crue, which was great. I mean, playing 15,000 seaters and stuff with bands like ourselves just fresh out of the clubs. It went over real well [Rock City News, January 1988].
Reminiscing about walking around at the arenas when they were opening for Crue and just freaking - our little band as a part of this huge, major thing [Circus Magazine, September 1989].
One of the shows took place on November 11 at the Cajun Dome in Lafayette, Louisiana. Not sure on whether the concert should be allowed to take place, a six-man delegation of local officials attended the earlier show in Mobile, Alabama on November 4, to find out if it "warranted any concern". This little mission was described in the Daily Advertiser on November 5. Some excerpts follow:

"Cajundome officials found a Motley Crue concert in Mobile to be “way better” than expected and anticipate “no major problems” when the rock group appears here Friday, the Dome Commission’s chairman said Wednesday. […] Bill Rucks III, speaking for a six-man contingent that previewed the act, said while it “may not be suitable to all people” a local assistant district attorney agreed it is “so far from” violation of obscenity laws as to not warrant serious concern. […] The trip followed complaints by several Lafayette citizens and groups that Motley Crue is not up to area legal and moral standards. […] Rucks added that performers used “tough language,” but claimed there was no promotion of drugs or Satanic views in the lyrics he heard " [Daily Advertiser, November 5, 1987].

The same newspaper also published an interview of the show:

"It was a 14-year-old’s fantasy and a parent’s nightmare. […] Even before the opening act, Guns and Roses, took the stage, the decibel level was deafening. When Guns and Roses did go on stage, sound levels became excruciating. There is little to say about the music. Each song was indistinguishable from the one before. This was the heaviest of heavy metal. […] Profanity was the order of the evening. Unprintable four letter words spewed forth with unpleasant regularity. The band even offered up a little of their own philosophy while commenting from the stage about the controversy that preceded their appearance here. “The apathy of the young,” said the lead singer, “is the strength of the old.” A telling point about the overall tender years of the audience members is that the singer followed that comment by asking if the audience knew what the word apathy meant. […] Musically, Motley Crue is light years ahead of Guns and Roses. Crue band members can and occasionally did play their musical instruments with a high degree of skill […]. And Lafayette was not spared the group’s cheeky salute as the drummer dropped his pants and mooned the audience. [...] The insult to the injury here is that neither band is especially good. Mediocrity rises to the top again. There is good rock ’n’ roll. There is even good heavy metal. The Motley Crue/Guns and Roses concert was neither. It was just a chance for the younger citizens of Lafayette to rebel " [The Daily Advertiser, November 7, 1987].

The last show of the tour took place at the Sportarium in Hollywood, Florida, on November 29, 1987. As customary, the headliners decided to prank the opener band:

We had one bomb explode on us once. And we didn't even do it! The guys in Mötley Crüe when we toured with them. Scared the shit [interrupted]. It was the first song [interrupted]. 'It's So Easy', and it comes in goes "bom-cha-bom-bom-cha-BOOOOM!" and I watched everybody in the band, standing in front, in one leap they were all behind me [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1988].
Scared the shit out of me, too! […] It was sick. It was the last show. They did it as a joke to us [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1988].
Presumably, later that very evening, Slash and Nikki Sixx visited the Rainbow club in Los Angeles for some post-tour partying. Sixx overdosed and was wheeled out of the Rainbow on a stretcher and rushed to the hospital where for a period of six hours doctors feared for his life [Hit Parader, November 1988]. According to Izzy, they should also have continued touring with Motley in Europe after the US tour, but this was cancelled when the guys in Motley had to "go into detox" [The Face, October 1987]. This was likely due to Sixx' overdose. This planned European tour with Motley is mentioned in other contemporary sources, and was planned to extend into 1988 [Interview with Steven Harris, December 1987; Rock City News, January 1988].

There were many similarities between Guns N' Roses and Mötley Crüe, something Sixx would acknowledge: "We've had our influences, and Guns N' Roses have theirs. We've toured together, and hung out together, and I think we call each other friends. That's cool. I don't see them as competition to us because we're all working towards the same goal - to play rock and roll for the kids out there. They're going through some of the things that we went through five or six years ago, and they're having a great time. More power to 'em. Bands like Guns N' Roses are what rock and roll are all about in my book" [Hit Parader, November 1988].


Last edited by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 20:08; edited 1 time in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 20:06

NOVEMBER 22, 1987 - THE OMNI, ATLANTA, AXL GETS ARRESTED


In Atlanta on November 22, at The Omni, when touring with Motley Crue, Axl jumped into the crowd to fight a security man he claimed pushed one of his friends [The Atlanta Constitution, November 24, 1987; Rolling Stone, November 1988]. According to Doc McGhee, the manager of Mötley Crüe, the security man was an off-duty cop [Nikky Sixx biography, 2008].

Charlie Brusco, the Omni's head of security would later describe the incident like this: "First strike, he hit an Atlanta police officer. Second strike, he hit a female Atlanta police officer. Third strike, he hit a black female Atlanta police officer. He’s going to jail" [Vulture, 2016].

With Axl detained, roadie Big Ron got on stage to sing 'Honky Town Women' and 'Communication Breakdown' [Rolling Stone, November 1988]. According to McGhee, he sang 'Communication Breakdown' four times, "not terribly well" [Nikki Sixx biography, 2008]. McGhee would also say that Slash sang "a few songs", including a Rolling Stones song [Nikki Sixx biography, 2008].

According to Brusco, he begged for Rose to be allowed to finish the show and finally the head of security said, "If he apologizes to the police officer in writing, we’ll let him go." Axl signed his apology, and security brought in the female officer who had been hit. Axl looked up and said, “Fuck you, you fucking jag-off cop.” Axl was then hauled to jail, and the show was canceled.

"I don’t think,” Brusco would say, "I did another Guns show after that" [Vulture, 2016]. To avoid a trial, Axl pleaded guilty to assaulting the police and paid a fine [Rolling Stone, November 1988] and was released the day after [Nikki Sixx biography, 2008].

The band members would remember it this way:

Two nights ago we did a show in Atlanta. At about the second song, I found myself on the way to jail. I won’t go into a lot of detail on that, but, basically, that was a case of people getting pushed around to sit in the back, people getting hurt to sit in the back; and people abusing their authority and guys going “Look, I got the lead singer!”. I’m gonna dedicate this to the “Atlanta’s finest” and to the guys that bailed me out. This is a song called “Out Ta Get Me”! [Concert at Lakeland Civic Center, Lakeland, FL - 11.24.1987]
This guy named Scott, he works in a record store up in Detroit, and he sells records, he’s got a Guns N’ Roses tattoo and stuff, and he comes to a lot of our shows. And the show is in Atlanta, at the Omni, and they make the people... the people can’t get in the aisles, people can’t come to the front of the stage, it’s a big law there; the security will get fined like $25,000 if people are in the aisles or anything. But some of the security doesn’t really seem to care about that, they like the job so they can push around kids. On the Friday night show [11.20.1987] there was this one guy particularly hassling the kids... and the kids don’t know, they come round to the front of the stage, they just think it’s a concert. And this guy like was being overly rough and I jumped off the stage into the pit, leaned on the barricade and grabbed him. [Band interview after the show in Lakeland, FL, 11.24.1987, “A Night In The Jungle”, MTV]
We just recently did a show in Atlanta, opening up for Motley Crue [...], and I [...] actually warned a security guard being a little shit and pushing the kids around, really proving that he was an asshole, and he called me out. So I dived down over the fucking rail, and before I got over the rail, the fucker hit me. So I got him about three times, and now I’m being charged with four counts of assault for hitting police that I never touched. These are the kind of people that can just suck my dick! You know, I’ve got nothing against fucking security. [?] you're out doing your job, but you don’t need to fucking push kids; not my friends that come here. These are the kind of people that get me down. They make me feel that somebody out there is out to get me! [Concert at UIC Pavilion, Chicago, IL - 12.18.1987]
I can think of a few people I wouldn't want to have [Appetite For Destruction] in their collections, like the Atlanta police. I don't want them to even have listened to it at all. [Rock Scene magazine, June 1988]
We played in Atlanta and Axl jumped off the stage to help out a fan who was getting beaten by these security guys. He never made it back on stage so we improvised a seven minute blues jam ["In The Classic Way", Guitar For The Practicing Musician, September 1988].
During one show, Axl jumped into the crowd to beat up a security guard who pushed one of our friends around, so he wound up going to jail and we had to do the show without him. We had a roadie come out and sing with us, and the crowd really dug it [Goldmine, May 19, 1989].
In Atlanta I dived in and I had police saying I hit them. I never did, but I had to plead guilty because we didn't have any money at the time. Lie? Yes, I guess I did lie once. I lied and said that I hit four cops. I guess we should reopen the case and take me to trial for perjury. But I didn't have $56,000 to pay them off under the table ["There's A Riot Going On!", Musician, September 1991].


Last edited by Soulmonster on Mon 24 Jun 2019 - 16:57; edited 2 times in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 20:08

SINGLES AND MUSIC VIDEOS FROM 'APPETITE FOR DESTRUCTION'


MTV and other music channels were very important in the 80s and music singles and accompanying videos were crucial to market sales.

The first single off 'Appetite' was 'It's So Easy/Mr. Brownstone' and it was released in the UK already in June 15, 1987, well before the release of the record. This was to coincide with the band playing their June concerts at the Marquee in London. According to a San Francisco Chronicle article from August 1987 [The San Francisco Chronicle, August 30, 1987], the single was accompanied with a music video that cost $85,000, and that was banned from MTV for "being too racy and violent." This is confusing since the band would make a video for 'It's So Easy' in October 1989, which would be banned due to sexual content. It could be that the Chronicle is talking about the music video for 'Welcome to the Jungle' which contained violent clips, but this video wouldn't be released until the next month, September 1987. So perhaps the band made an early music video for 'It's So Easy' which would later be edited with live clips from 1989? Or perhaps the music video for 'Jungle' was released prior to the single release?

The next single out was 'Welcome to the Jungle' and it was released on September 28, 1987 in the UK and in October in the US. It is clear that Axl already a year before had a plan for the music video's thematic content:

[Our first video] is going to be realistic and it might show a lot of violence so it might get banned. There's a lot of violence in the world. That's the environment we live in and we like to show what we live in rather than hide it and act like everything is nice and sugary.

Everybody likes to paint their pretty pictures, but that just ain't how it is. It just seems easier to know the rougher side [of life] than the more pleasant side just because it's more readily accessible
[Los Angeles Times, June 7, 1986].
According to Vicky Hamilton, the 'Welcome to the Jungle' video was partly inspired by the 'Faces Of Death' series of snuff video clips which Axl had studied in detail while living in her apartment [Vicky Hamilton, "Appetite For Dysfunction", 2014, p. 134]. The band had paid for news footage that didn't make it into the final edit:

There's a few changes been made to this video. We bought actual news footage that had been shown on television from NBC and CBS and ABC, but we had to cut a lot of that out [MTV Headbanger's Ball, October 24, 1987].
Despite cutting a lot of the footage out, the video was controversial and received little airplay. In July 1988 Geffen President Eddie Rosenblatt would refer to the low initial sales of the 'Welcome to the Jungle' single as a "flop".

The third single out was to be 'Sweet Child O' Mine.' The hope was that this ballad would boost record sales which was low for the first period after the release of 'Appetite'. It was released in August 1987. For the video to 'Sweet Child', Axl again had plans:

We did "Sweet Child" the other night and I wasn't thrilled with it. I like where we have the band playing live, and working on that. Other than that, I have to see what came out. We filmed a lot of stuff with us just hanging out, so I have to see that. What we did, the filming, was pretty fun, but some things came up, like "Sweet Child" is used when they roll the credits to the movie Bad Dreams, and we had come up with this whole concept of how we were gonna film our video in an insane asylum, then when we went and saw the screening of the movie and no one, including our manager, knew that the whole movie was filmed inside an insane asylum! That kind of shot down all the fun. I really wanted to do the conceptual footage, and we really didn't do any for this video. So that's the part that I guess, that little bit of acting, that I like doing [Rock Scene, June 1988].
Axl would later get to make conceptually complex music videos for singles for the Use Your Illusion albums.

'Sweet Child O' Mine' became a very popular single and won both an American Music Award (AMA) for “Favorite Single, Pop/Rock” and the MTV award for “Best Metal/Hard Rock Video” [Geffen Press Release, September 1991].

In January 1989 the released 'Paradise City' and they also decided to make a video for their first single, 'It's So Easy':

[…] well ... we're gonna have a home video, at some point. So we wanted to do some stuff that was, like, no-holds-barred, uncensored things... Not worrying about whether MTV's gonna play it, y'know? Just go out there and do a fuckin' blown-out realistic video... […] I don't really give a shit [if MTV plays it], to tell you the truth... I mean, we've done three videos already- four videos now, with 'Patience' - and this is more or less just for us, so we're just gonna put the harshest stuff in it, you know, and leave it like that. I really don't care if MTV or anyone else plays it or not, it'll just be there all the same, and if people wanna see it bad enough, they'll find it . .. [Kerrang! April 1989].
The concluding single from 'Appetite' was Nightrain, released in July 1989, without an accompanying music video.


Last edited by Soulmonster on Sun 23 Jun 2019 - 9:51; edited 2 times in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 20:15

DECEMBER 1987 - OPENING FOR ALICE COOPER


The Mötley Crue tour ended after Nikki Sixx' overdose on November 29, and the band, who had planned to continue touring with Motley in Europe [The Face, October 1989] was without a job. Fortunately, the band got a call from Alice Cooper asking them to open for him for two weeks in December (December 3-19, 1987) [The Face, October 1989].

We said, 'Alice Cooper... Fuckin' A!' Hey, I grew up listening to y'know "Sick Things", "I Love the Dead". It was a lot better than fuckin' reality. So we did 'em. Alice was cool. He's still... Y'know... "Alice" [The Face, October 1989].
Opening for Alice Cooper was monumental because me and Izzy, it's funny, we leave Alice Cooper onstage and go backstage to get our showers and have an old Alice Cooper taped in, you know, in the deck playing, and not because we were on tour with Alice Coopers but because it's stuff we listen to. And I go, "Wait a minute man, we'll shut the tape off and go out and watch it live for the first time in our lives" [Interview with Steve Harris, December 1987].
The first show took place at La Villa Real Special Events Center in McAllen, TX, USA, on December 3, 1987. While touring in South America in late 1992, Axl would mention how Mexico is one of his favorite countries to tour in and that the McAllen show in 1987 was particularly good due to all the Mexicans attending:

We did a show in McAllen, Texas when we were opening for Alice Cooper, and there was 5,000 people and the majority was Mexican. It was one the most exciting crowds we’ve played to [Telefe, December 4, 1992].
The band then went to Dallas, Houston, San Antonio, Midland (this show was likely cancelled due to too few tickets sold [Odessa American, Dec. 8, 1987], Cape Girardeu (?), and Louiseville.

This was an eventful tour, with Steven breaking his hand and having to be replaced with Fred Coury and fights (see below).

The band would remember the shows with Alice Cooper this way:

We were the epitome of Red Dog surviving on the road. Plus we had to play in the corner of the stage because Alice’s stage set was so large [Rock City News, January 1988].
Everybody in the band on the Alice Cooper tour was really cool to us, they dug it. They’d be walking down the halls going, “Welcome to the Jungle”, you know. And we hung out with Alice and was like, you know, this is a great band and stuff, and we did photos with him [Rock City News, January 1988].
The last night of the tour he was getting off the stage, and me and Axl were hanging out on the side, and he goes by and says, “Hey man, thanks for everything” [Rock City News, January 1988].


Last edited by Soulmonster on Fri 21 Jun 2019 - 20:19; edited 2 times in total
Soulmonster
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 9269
Plectra : 57186
Reputation : 785
Join date : 2010-07-06

Back to top Go down

THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS - Page 2 Empty Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 2 of 8 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum