APPETITE FOR DISCUSSION
Welcome to Appetite for Discussion -- a Guns N' Roses fan forum!

Please feel free to look around the forum as a guest, I hope you will find something of interest. If you want to join the discussions or contribute in other ways then you need to become a member. Registering is free and easy.

Cheers!
SoulMonster

2018.09.28 - LA Times - Interview with Slash

Go down

2018.09.28 - LA Times - Interview with Slash

Post by Soulmonster on Sat Sep 29, 2018 5:40 am

Clay Marshall wrote:Slash is back with the Conspirators, but won't rule out a new Guns N' Roses album

Three years ago, Slash received an unexpected phone call that forced him to rethink everything.

At the time, the man born 53 years ago as Saul Hudson – who rose to fame in the late 1980s as the cigarette-dangling, Les Paul-playing, top hat-wearing lead guitarist of Guns N' Roses – had spent more than a year touring the world in support of his third solo album.

With the tour winding down, the group, featuring vocalist Myles Kennedy and a band of backing musicians called the Conspirators, had started writing material for a new album. The plan was to record and release it in 2016.

Then the phone rang. And the artist, who had long traded rock ’n’ roll recklessness for stability and independence, was being asked to revisit his past.

The call set off an unlikely chain of events that would answer the prayers of hard rock fans who made GNR's landmark 1987 debut “Appetite for Destruction” the bestselling debut album of all time. Axl Rose, the group's razor-lunged vocalist and its last remaining original member, wanted to mend bridges with the guitarist, who left the band in 1996 due to musical and personal clashes.

“When Axl and I had our first conversation in 20 years, it was really great,” Slash says from an office inside his Snakepit Studios, a house on a quiet residential street in the San Fernando Valley that he recently purchased and subsequently converted into a recording facility.

“It was a huge load off my mind for him and I to talk, because there's been so much bad blood perpetuated over the years by the media.”

Soon after, the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival announced the headlining act for its events in the spring of 2016 – a partial Guns N' Roses reunion featuring Slash, Rose and original bassist Duff McKagan. Knowing that additional GNR performances (which would ultimately include shows at Dodger Stadium, the Forum and Staples Center) would follow, Slash broke the news to Kennedy and his Conspirators band mates.

A new album would be postponed indefinitely.

“I went to the Conspirators guys and said, 'Look, I'm going to do this Guns N' Roses thing. I have no idea where that's going to go,'” Slash recalls. “Of course, the Guns N' Roses thing turned into this juggernaut, but I was always looking for a gap to be able to go back and finish what we started with the Conspirators. I had no intention of putting that to rest just because Guns N' Roses was happening.”

Slash says that while his Conspirators band members supported his return to GNR, he felt a sense of guilt over leaving them hanging.

“We'd been doing this up until that point for pretty much five years straight, so that, I felt bad about,” he explains. “But Guns was a major part of who I am, and I was so happy to be doing something positive with that [again].”

During a late 2017 break in GNR's “Not In This Lifetime” tour – which concludes in South Africa in November and already ranks as the fourth-highest grossing tour of all time, according to industry trade publication Billboard – Slash made good on his word to resurrect the Conspirators.

“We got together and started revisiting some of those old ideas [from 2015],” he says. “We had a great time getting back in a room together. I felt better because I'd put everybody in a state of limbo for a year and a half, so it was really good to get together and work on the record.”

The result is “Living the Dream,” which Slash and many rock critics believe is his best work since the demise of Velvet Revolver, his mid-'00s super-group that featured the late Scott Weiland (Stone Temple Pilots) on vocals. Though the album – recorded largely at Snakepit on a modest 16-track console – salutes the timeless classic rock sensibilities of groups such as Aerosmith and AC/DC, it also draws on unexpected funk, boogie, blues and garage rock influences.

“I'm not into this whole thing where rock ’n’ roll has to be something that sounds like something in the past,” he says. “There's an element for me as a musician that is pretty broad [in terms of] influences, but not every band that I'm in are you able to do that kind of stuff. With the Conspirators, I've found that almost anything I write we can do, as long as Myles wants to sing it.”
Still, he's aware that the riff-driven style of rock he champions isn't necessarily the current flavor of the month. “I'm a guitar guy,” he says. “But where music is right now, and where rock ’n’ roll is in 2018, you just sort of have to accept that new rock ’n’ roll isn't as commercially viable as hip-hop or Top 40. I don't even know what rock ’n’ roll's place is in the industry [today], but as long as it's genuine, it will always be there.”

Earlier this month, Slash, Kennedy and the Conspirators played their first show together in nearly three years, a private concert for satellite radio contest winners at the Whisky a Go Go, one of a number of local clubs where GNR cut its teeth. The initial leg of the “Living the Dream” tour officially began two nights later; it will wrap up with a performance at the Palladium on Oct. 16.
Onstage at the Whisky, the band – Slash, Kennedy, bassist Todd Kerns, drummer Brent Fitz and rhythm guitarist Frank Sidoris – showed no signs of rust during a nearly two-hour set. Highlights included the world premieres of five songs from “Living the Dream,” as well as a swaggering, 13-minute rendition of Guns N' Roses' “Rocket Queen.” Unlike a GNR show, there were no pyrotechnics or video screens – just a stage with five musicians, a drum kit and a wall of amplifiers.

“I really, really dig playing in the Conspirators,” Slash says. “It's just a little, simple rock ’n’ roll band, and I love that. There's really not a lot of bells and whistles, and there's not a lot of outside pressure. I love the idea that we're going to play clubs and do this sweaty, toe-to-toe, raw rock ’n’ roll thing. I think I've always needed that because Guns N' Roses became such a big thing with so many moving parts and so many people involved.”

Slash expects to spend much of 2019 on the road with the Conspirators, but considering the success of the GNR tour, he understands fans' desire to see that group take the next step in its comeback and record new material. “I don't want to say anything that's going to make people start thinking something [is happening], because there's nothing set up,” he says.

“But it's definitely on my mind. I know it's on Axl's mind, and I know it's on Duff's mind. It's one of those things that you don't want to put a timeline or a deadline on. You just let it be, and it will happen when it happens.”

It's a surprisingly Zen-like perspective for someone who was once a symbol of rock debauchery and whose exploits were chronicled in a 2007 autobiography that featured the tag line “it seems excessive, but that doesn't mean it didn't happen.”
“I didn't have much of a future left if I kept going down that road,” Slash, now 12 years sober, says.

“When I finally came to terms with [addiction] and decided that I was not enjoying it anymore, all that energy I was putting into copping and using just went straight into music. I think it's really helped me to become a better player.”
Source: [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
avatar
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 8511
Plectra : 54962
Reputation : 749
Join date : 2010-07-05

Back to top Go down

Re: 2018.09.28 - LA Times - Interview with Slash

Post by Soulmonster on Sat Oct 13, 2018 6:47 am

Blabbermouth had an article recently where they transcribed parts of an interview Slash did with Clay Marshall at LA Times. I haven't been found that footage/interview. I believe it must be from the interview in the first post here, which wasn't included in LA Times' article. Where Blabbermouth found this, is unknown to me. Anyway, here is Blabbermouth's excerpts of Marshall's interview with Slash not published in LA Times:

During a recent interview with the Los Angeles Times about his new solo album, "Living The Dream", GUNS N' ROSES guitarist Slash spoke at length with writer Clay Marshall about a number of topics. Some select "outtakes" appear below (as transcribed by BLABBERMOUTH.NET).

On whether there's a dream "guest star" situation for him equivalent to Axl Rose touring with AC/DC:

Slash: "I can't think of anything off the top of my head. The Axl-doing-AC/DC thing, I went and checked that out, and it was awesome. I was probably as skeptical as anybody because of the iconic status of the band, and he pulled it off and it was great. I'm probably a little bit more intimidated about the idea of having to fill someone's shoes — someone that I look up to or had a big influence on me. If I was going to get that phone call, I'd want to do it in a band that no one would expect me to be in."

On his new recording facility, Snakepit Studios:

Story continues after advertisement


Slash: "It's nice to have a spot that's yours, and you're not under the gun for lockouts or that kind of thing, where you can just go in and the only people around are yourself and your tech and your producer and engineer, whatever it is, and just be able to hang out all day without any time constrictions. That is definitely cool."

On his sobriety:

Slash: "I was always passionate about guitars and music, and that's really at the end of the day, along with a couple other little things, [what] really saved me. I'm really fortunate, because for a lot of people, their only inspiration came from using. I didn't have that problem, so when I came out of it, I got really into playing and getting better at what I was doing. The only thing I've noticed the difference is, I tend to play with more energy and a lot faster than I did back when I was drunk — which led to some great long notes, but..."

On the defibrillator he still has in his chest:

Slash: "I had the option to leave it in or take it out, but taking it out meant an operation where they were going to have to disconnect the electric wire from my heart. I was like, 'Eh, just leave it in.' But I'm in good health. I haven't had any issues like that since basically 2002. That was the last incident. It was just because I never explained to the doctor when they put it in — you have to know the lowest threshold for your heartbeat and what's your highest, and I didn't take into account the adrenaline from performing, so it was set at certain place. When I'd go out and get going, playing, it would kick in, so I had it adjusted and I didn't have that problem again."

On whether he still gets excited playing iconic venues in his Los Angeles hometown:

Slash: "There's still that sort of feeling like when you were a kid, and all those places you sort of looked on with that dreamy sort of [perspective]. That never really totally leaves, no matter how many times you play there. I remember with GUNS, just recently playing The Forum, it still holds that allure from when you were young and fantasized about playing those venues."

On the best advice he received from AEROSMITH's Joe Perry:

Slash: "The only piece of real, sort of direct advice he ever gave me was way back in 1988, I think it was, when he told me. I called him up from Japan at one point to tell him that Izzy [Stradlin] was in a bad way. I think he thought I was talking about Izzy like I was talking about myself, but using Izzy. He was like, 'I'll tell you right now — he needs to get help, but then if you do that, don't come back to me if you fuck up. I'm not here for that. It's not a destination, it's a journey,' which is a classic Alcoholics Anonymous line. That's always sort of stuck with me. Other than that, Joe's not really what I would consider an advice-giver. That's one of the reasons I like him so much — he's a wealth of knowledge, but he's not sort of telling you what you should do."

On his past comments that being a rock star is "an intersection of who you are and who you want to be":

Slash: "For me, I think that really having a perspective on it now, when I was a kid coming up, with the exception of the top hat, I was exactly the same [as I am now]. Being Slash the guitar player is an outlet for me that Slash the regular person on the street, day-to-day, there's an extension of that that I could never be as myself, but it's very relative. In other words, the guitar's that outlet that sitting here, I don't have."

On his feature film production company, Slash Fiction:

Slash: "I've got four different movies in different stages of development right now, so that's a whole other thing that I'm juggling all this at the same time. I love accomplishing shit, so it's great, because it's all moving and it's all sort of pointed in a direction of getting done or arriving at a positive place. They're all really great scripts and I've got two deals done and I've got two pending. They're horror/thriller. The thing with me is really good, intelligent, story-driven [and] character-driven dramas that have a scary twist to them. It's not slasher movies; it's not gore. That's fun for me because it's something outside of music that I'm still involved with music because there's a score, and if I can get to a point of doing a couple movies a year and just have a steady thing — they don't have to be huge or anything — that's exciting, so that's something I'm looking forward to."

On his goals for 2019 and beyond:

Slash: "Next year is all touring [with THE CONSPIRATORS], but going beyond that, obviously I'm not going to not mention wanting to do a GUNS record along the way. It's not a personal challenge or anything, but I would love to see a GUNS record get done and have it be, to us, really great. That would be awesome. I'm looking forward to THE CONSPIRATORS tour. I'm really happy with the record. For the most part, that's it — do this tour, let's hope for a GUNS thing, let's just keep it all going."

Slash released "Living The Dream", his fourth solo album (and third with Myles Kennedy and THE CONSPIRATORS), on September 21 via his own label, Snakepit Records, in partnership with Roadrunner Records.
avatar
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 8511
Plectra : 54962
Reputation : 749
Join date : 2010-07-05

Back to top Go down

Re: 2018.09.28 - LA Times - Interview with Slash

Post by Blackstar on Sat Oct 13, 2018 8:04 am

Yes, Blabbermouth has been posting transcribed excerpts in four different articles. I realised it's outtakes from this L.A. interview but I made a separate thread for the first article and then added the other three ones:
2018.09.DD - Slash interview with Clay Marshall (excerpts)
Do you think we should merge it with this one?

I looked for the source (I guess it's an audio one) but I couldn't find it either.
avatar
Blackstar
ADMIN

Posts : 957
Plectra : 7815
Reputation : 57
Join date : 2018-03-17

Back to top Go down

Re: 2018.09.28 - LA Times - Interview with Slash

Post by Soulmonster on Sat Oct 13, 2018 8:27 am

Ah, I missed that! No, let's just keep it as it is Smile We don't know for sure it was actually published by LA Times, so it is probably better to not attribute it to them.
avatar
Soulmonster
Tour plane captain

Admin & Founder
Posts : 8511
Plectra : 54962
Reputation : 749
Join date : 2010-07-05

Back to top Go down

Re: 2018.09.28 - LA Times - Interview with Slash

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum