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THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri Jan 18, 2019 9:59 pm

Maybe a chapter on groupies?

Matt: Every night's a fuckin' party, man. Chicks, beer, you name it. Take any chick you want, man. It's just like being in a candy store [VOX, October 1991].
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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Sat Jan 19, 2019 2:14 am

HOW THE BAND MEMBERS DEALT WITH AXL DURING THE 'USE YOUR ILLUSION' TOURING

"It's been said that you can't consider yourself fully acquainted with Axl Rose until you have at least once wanted to tell him to fuck off. Those who know him well, though, rarely do. Because it's apparent to anyone who spends any time with him that for all of Rose's seething rage and vicious wordplays, for all the time he spends lashing out at the rest of the world, he usually isn't fighting anyone but himself" [Rolling Stone, September 1991].

---------------------------------

For quite a while, the band's approach to Axl had been to leave him alone rather than confront him. As one band member was quoted as saying to VOX journalist Nick Kent: "Nowadays we just let Axl do pretty much what he feels, 'cos he'll only do it anyway" [VOX, October 1991]. Kent would also write that Axl had insisted on the 'Use Your Illusion' albums being so long, had insisted that Skid Row should open on their tour (despite band members despising them), calling for the resignation of Alan Niven, and what music would be played over the PA before the shows [VOX, October 1991]. Many articles would also imply that the label was afraid of him and his temper and behavior and would rather accommodate him than put the foot down. Simply put, "Axl runs the group" [VOX, October 1991].

In July 1991, Matt would praise Axl's stubborness:

Axl's so fuckin' great. Anything he does or says, it's just because that's the way he really is. He's beyond real, ya know. I've never seen anyone dare to talk shit to him, ever. I love that [VOX, October 1991].
Yet, only a month or so later, Matt would be the one that attempted to confront Axl when he refused to return to stage in Mannheim in August:

Matt Sorum tried a novel approach when Axl left; maybe to a "new" guy it was the obvious thing to do. He went to find Axl and confront him. He was turned away by Axl's security detail [Duff's autobiography, "It's So Easy", 2011, p. 194].
So Matt went down to Axl's van to rally him, but as he got down there, he ran into Axl, who had emerged to head back to the stage. Matt was so fired up, though, that he got in Axl's face regardless, to the degree that it almost got physical.

"What the fuck are you doing?" Matt yelled. "Get back onstage!"

I ran up and got between them, because it wasn't a good situation. Axl can get completely psycho when he decides to fight and Matt weighs twice as much as I do - and he plays the drums - so it wasn't exactly a good place for me to be. Axl went back to his van, and it didn't look like he was coming out again
[Slash's autobiography, p 343-344].
And in late August, as the band visited England for their August 31 show at Wembley, it was rumored that unless Axl "continued to be difficult to work with", Matt would quit the band [Music Life, November 17, 1991]. In November, when Axl hosted the rock show Rockline, he was confronted wit the rumors that Matt would leave the band because of "arguments and that he can’t deal with the hysteria on the tour":

It got emotionally high and the tensions got high with everybody at different points. But, you know, Matt is working his ass off and he’s great. […] As Matt puts it, it’s like, you know, now and then you get the road blues. […] Matt is amazing, you know. And it’s a real pleasure to introduce him to the world in the way he de [Rockline, November 27, 1991].

In early 1992 Slash would describe himself getting labelled a mediator in the band due to his closeness with Axl:

Well, I know Axl real well and a hell of a lot better than anyone’s gonna know him from reading the press. I know where he’s coming from and I may be a little more level-headed so I guess I get labelled as the mediator at this point. With Axl though, a lot of it comes from just unbridled sincerity. Everything about him as a performer and a singer comes from his personality, so the shit that makes him crazy or the shit that he finds hard to deal with is, at the same time, what makes his talent, you know? […]Sure, shit goes down and I keep it together, but with me it’s pretty simple. It’s ‘Get the fuck up there and plug in that guitar and go!’. With him it isn’t that simple. There’s a lot going on part from the three hours that we spend up there and it’s that shit that affects him [Raw Magazine, March 4, 1992].


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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Sat Jan 19, 2019 2:17 am

A chapter about Axl and GN'R running into problems with other bands during the 1991-1993 touring.

Mick Wall: "Upon their arrival at the Maracana, Axl Rose announced that neither he nor Guns N’ Roses would take the stage that night if a) Judas Priest used any of their pyrotechnics; b) played more than one encore, c) didn’t cut their set by at least 20 minutes and d) used the motorcycle.

Eventually, after much to-ing and fro-ing of messengers between the opposing dressing rooms, it was agreed to allow Priest to play their two encores and Rob was told he could keep the motorcycle. But Priest were still forced to drop five numbers from their set... and the use of their pyrotechnics was definitely ruled out.

But if Guns N’ Roses thought that putting a vice on the performance of Judas Priest would make their own entrance more plausible, the results had exactly the opposite affect, Priest turning in a show that left the Maracana audience stunned and howling for more.

Rob Halford, in particular, was brilliant, the best I’ve seen him in years, and the band were - as advertised - pure steel.

IF ANYTHING, being treated like that only made us more determined to put on a really hard show,” said a still- pouring-with-sweat Halford afterwards. “You know, I think it sorts out the professionals — the men from the boys. I mean, we’ve dealt with all this before.

“And I think that, more than anything, when people try and pull a stunt like that on you it always backfires on them. It’s like, what are you trying to prove here anyway? Do you think that by taking away those things you’re gonna restrict the band’s ability to get a crowd reaction, or affect our performance as musicians?

“There’s no way! We’ve been around too many years to let something like that affect us. Out of all the people at this Rock In Rio festival, Priest have got the longest history. We’ve made more albums, we’ve done more festivals, we’ve done more tours.

“So it’s easier for us to handle but I still can’t understand that kind of attitude problem. It just doesn’t make sense.”

And neither did the pallid attempt at an explanation by one of the road crew offered to Steffan Chirazi and I the next day.

“Guns got pissed off when New Kids On The Block used their side-stage ramps without asking the other night,” he said with the kind of wide-eyed chewing gum sincerity only a true American flunky can summon, “and now they’re paranoid about everything.”

Well, he got that part right.

I didn’t know what to say. Steffan did, though. “Well,” he huffed as though he were about to spontaneously combust, “I think it’s come to something when Guns N’ Roses can be victimised by a bunch of miming useless twats!” Out of the mouths of babes and burger princes, as they say..." [Kerrang! January 1991].

Axl would vehemently deny this:

"We went onstage early because Judas Priest had pulled off on their own accord, and then said that we asked them to leave the stage early, trying to make us look bad. We had told Judas that they could play as long as they wanted, they could have whatever they wanted. The only thing they couldn't have, which the fire marshal wouldn't allow, was their pyro. Then Rob Halford is in magazines saying that I wouldn't allow him to have his Harley. I heard about that during the day. One of the guys who worked with us was in my room with a walkie-talkie, so I grabbed it and said, "Tell Robbie he can have anything he wants." There was no way I wasn't going to allow Judas Priest to do whatever they wanted, because I didn't want bad vibes. Judas Priest was one of the major influences on my singing because Rob Halford is one of the technically best in the world at what he does. And for me to tell them that they couldn't have their Harley is stupid! This guy was saying that I wouldn't allow it, which was a lie!" [Musician, September 1991].

During the Rock in Rio shows, Axl also had problems with Dave Mustaine from Motorhead:

"When we played at Rock In Rio II, Dave Mustaine of Megadeth had been trying to get me to hang out with him the whole show. He had all kinds of people coming up to me and asking me to talk to him and so on. But due to my past experiences with Dave Mustaine, every time I've talked to him, no matter how good the conversation or how good I thought things were, a couple of days later he would try and pull a fast move, backstabbing, just to get himself some coverage. It's just somebody I didn't want to hang out with. It was handled nicely. The only person I spent time with in any of the bands was Billy Idol. We came back to L.A. and Dave's on the radio saying that they won't be playing any dates with Guns N' Roses. That there were deaths at the show. Guns N' Roses shouldn't have played on the night that they played and all this other stuff. What Dave didn't realize is that Guns N' Roses was one of the reasons there was a Rock In Rio II. The people who ran the television station down there and were major financers wanted to see Guns N' Roses. The owner of the television station wanted to see Guns N' Roses" [Musician, September 1991].
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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Sat Jan 19, 2019 2:21 am

JULY-OCTOBER 1992 - TOURING WITH METALLICA

The band had attempted to tour with Metallica earlier. Already in early 1988 they had tried to get onto the Monster of Rock tour with Metallica, but was refused [Spin, may 1988]. They later had a European tour in the autumn of 1988 planned, but this was shelved when they needed a break after the Aerosmith tour [Sounds Magazine, August 1988; Kerrang! July 1988]. According to Blast Magazine, the interest was mutual: "Metallica's new album is tentatively called And Justice For All. The band is planning a world tour and hopes to take Guns N' Roses with them for at least some European dates" [Blast! May 1988].

There's an element in Metallica that's the same with us. We couldn't really go out and do gigs with Slayer, but with Metallica it's not so much the style of music we play, it's more an attitude of going out and generating a lotta energy. Although, we're a helluva lot sloppier than Metallica! Rock 'n' roll is based on attitude [Sounds Magazine, August 1988].
We've thinking about tours, like, our favorite new bands out, like Metallica. We're friends with those guys and stuff and we're trying to work out something with those guys. But it's like, you know, they're going like we are, [?] we think that might be a monster show [KJJO 104, August 1988].
But first in the beginning of 1992, after the release of 'Illusions', were rumors spreading again that Metallica and Guns N' Roses would tour together [Dayton Daily News, January 10, 1992]. Slash was confronted with the rumors that Skid Row would also be part of the Metallica tour:

Well, I don’t think the Skids are gonna be on it. We’re talking about doing it with Nirvana but we need to see where those guys are at. Metallica, Nirvana and us sounds pretty good to me. I went and saw Nirvana last night and they’re pretty good friends of mine so hopefully that’ll help even though we’re very different bands [Raw Magazine, March 4, 1992].


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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Sat Jan 19, 2019 2:23 am

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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Sat Jan 19, 2019 6:47 pm

RIOTS

Another chapter that will be moved later.

Slash: "I read something in a magazine - it might have been a quote from me or from Axl, I can't remember - where it said we liked seeing an audience at the point where everybody's about to beat each other up and that we get off on that kind of thing... that we've generated that much excitement, that much intensity. [...] But to correct myself on anything I might have been quoted as saying in the past, I don't really want to see anybody beating themselves up, because crowd violence is not a pretty sight. […] Any individual getting hurt during a rock show really isn't what it's all about... But it is a fine line because you do generate that much of power where you can get people to go crazy like that. And it makes you crazier, and suddenly it can be like the whole place is about to explode! And that's great, but to get the crowd going that nuts you have to be able to find a way to stop it going any further from that point. You have to find a way to cool out or something fuckin' heavy will happen..." [Kerrang! April 1989].

Slash: "There's been a couple of gigs where we've had to consciously slow down a gear... Donington, of course, was one of them. There was another gig, in Upstate New York on the Aerosmith tour, which was particularly intense, too. After we got of stage, the medics booth outside, where all the casualties pass through, was just loaded with kids..." [Kerrang! April 1989].

Axl: "We generate a weird type of excitement. I mean, Izzy put it best, "When you're doing a ballad and people are killing each other in a crowd like in Weedsport, New York, beating the crap of each other, then something's wrong." We don't really understand it. We like the energy, you know. And everybody likes you to see a good bar-room brawl or something, but when it turns into such a mess, I mean, a bar-room brawl is a movie, it's not real life" [MTV Documentary, November 1989].

Duff: "There's some fierce stuff happening there, you know. It's a lot of pain and a lot of.....Uhm, violence, you know. When we get together it's a lot of violence.... and it's just a lot of stuff. We've lost a lot of friends last couple years, together all of our, you know, lots of friends, you know. It's a lot of stuff we've gone through together, and we get on stage all five of us together, it comes out" [MTV Documentary, November 1989].

Duff: I mean, I’m not trying to one-up on any... okay? But I’ve been in, like, 30 (?). 30 bands, you know? And it’s not like this. It’s different, you know? I think maybe because, I mean, it’s always on the edge. It’s always... Anything could happen any time, a riot could break out, because we’re so much on the edge [Backstage on June 7, aired on Much Much, July 1991].
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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Sat Jan 19, 2019 6:49 pm

OCTOBER 30, 1996 - SLASH LEAVES THE BAND

A quote for the future, a little premonition:

"The volatile chemistry between [Axl and Slash] puts them in the highest class, yet their inherent passion and pyromanic personalities will inevitably blow the partnership assunder sooner or later" [RAW Magazine, May 1989].

Slash being asked if he can see himself leave the band: Not really. I don't look at things in those terms, much. I'm not the kind of guy that has a secret Plan B ready to swing into operation if anything should ever go wrong with this band. We love each other too much as friends for me to worry my ass off about whether we might split up one day [Kerrang! July 1988].

Slash: "Sometimes you go 'What the fuck is it for?' Then you try to look where to escape to and there's nowhere to go. We been doing it for so long that we really would all feel sorta lost and lonely if it fell apart and we had to go out and do solo records. Because it wouldn't be Guns. None of us could reproduce that. Axl's got so much charisma - he's one of the best singers around. It’s his personality. He can go out and do something. What freaks me out is if the band falls apart, I'll never be able to shake the fact that I'm the ex-Guns n' Roses guitar player. And that's almost like selling your soul" [Rolling Stone, September 1991].

Slash: "No, my bond with this group is pretty much in my blood. What can I do? It's like if I have to put it down to, 'Well, do you want to keep playing? Or, 'are you gonna get out?' I want to keep playing and that's what keeps me alert and dealing with some of the really crazy shit that goes down" [RAW, October 1991].
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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Wed Feb 06, 2019 2:06 am

GEAR

A chapter on equipment:

As discussed previously, Slash had been trying out different guitar before joining GN'R and in his first period in the band, with a B.C. Rich Mockingbird being a favorite show guitar. This changed some time before the release of Appetite, when he got a Les Paul copy from Alan Niven, a "handmade yellow flame-top with zebra [Seymour Duncan] Alnico II pickups" [Guitar Player, December 1991]:

Slash: "I got a handmade '59 Les Paul copy, built by a guy who makes awesome guitars, better than anything the company produces now—nothing against Gibson. I think that's when I turned into a Gibson freak—Gibson and Marshall. That's been my standard until this album" [Guitar Player, December 1991].

This guitar would be Slash's primary instrument for recording 'Appetite':

Slash: "For the first record, I must have gone through 10 guitars trying to find one I liked. And I couldn't afford to buy some ridiculously expensive Les Paul. When our former manager showed up with this one, it became my main studio guitar. […] [I used it] for almost everything on Appetite and then for most of the heavier songs on Use Your Illusion" [Guitar Player, December 1991].

On the 'Illusions' Slash would also use other guitars:

Slash: "Some fucking great guitars—a '58 V and a '58 Explorer. There's a certain nasal sound that you can hear on "Heaven's Door," "Locomotive," and a couple of other songs—it's almost [Michael] Schenker-sounding. That's just the tone control on the V, no wah pedal. There were a couple of other guitars that people aren't used to hearing me play: I used one of those small-scale Music Mans like Keith Richards has. There's a Travis Bean that I use for slide on "Bad Obsession" [Illusion I]. When I first got into slide, I went to a Joe Perry Project show; he had a Travis Bean, and it sounded killer. So when I saw one in the paper, I bought It. It has a gorgeous mahogany body with this real subtle rainbow in the finish—it's almost airbrushed. I played maybe 20 different guitars on Use Your Illusion: a Strat, a Dobro, a 6-string bass, a banjo, some acoustics. But the sound that I'm recognized for is my Les Paul through a Marshall half-stack. […] I have several Guilds—a nice 12-string and a couple of great big dreadnoughts. I used a Gibson I-100 too" [Guitar Player, December 1991].

On the question of whether there would ever be a Slash signature Les Paul:

Slash: "At one point they had an idea for a Slash Les Paul. I gave them my best live guitar; they had it for six months, trying to get the weight and density and everything right. God bless the guys who worked on it, 'cause they're really cool, but they sent me four instruments and none of them sounded anywhere close to it. I'm sort of pissed off at Gibson, because in the six-odd years that I've been with them, I've only gotten three gold-tops that I can use live. And I've spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on old Gibsons. We just cannot seem to get a sound that I'm happy with from the new ones" [Guitar Player, December 1991].

In 1991 Slash got a new B.C. Rich:

Slash: "But a while ago I bought another [B.C. Rich] from this guy I met at the Cathouse [an L.A. club] one night. I used it in the video for "You Could Be Mine." B.C. Rich saw the video and were ecstatic" [Guitar World, February, 1992].

Duff: "The basses that I use, the Fender Jazz Specials, are slightly different. My basses are made an RCH longer, to allow for the strings flapping. My particular model was only made for a year or two. It's got sort of a Jazz neck and Precision body. It has a Precision pickup and a Jazz pickup in the back. The first bass I bought, the white Fender Jazz special, that I bought at the Guitar Center, had inadvertently been screwed up when they made it. As opposed to the neck being perfectly conical, mine is half eggshaped. Somebody in the shop filed it too much. I was so used to that bass, that when I went to try other basses, something wasn't right. It's like, wait a minute, something's different with these other Jazz Specials. I went down to the custom shop, and sure enough, they spun it through this graphic computer and found what was wrong-or, for me, right-with the bass. So now I have all my necks custom-made exactly like that one" [Guitar for the Practising Musician, April 1992].

Duff: "I just retired my original white bass. It's at home. But, like I said, I had to get the other basses made exactly like it. Me and John Paige at Fender worked together. It took a long time. I didn't know it was gonna be this difficult" [Guitar for the Practising Musician, April 1992].


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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:21 am

SLASH'S SNAKEPIT

Already back in August 1991, when Guitar Player interviewed him, Slash was thinking about doing a record with another band:

Slash: "But if we take a long hiatus again, I'd like to put out, not really a solo record, but something with another band—a temporary thing that I'd control. It would be geared towards an almost heavy metal funk-rock concept—music with killer rock and roll vocals and the most awesome riffs. Almost like "Jungle," only a little bit tighter and heavier. A long time ago, Aerosmith got close; Beck has a couple of magic moments too. But I don't want it to be a guitar record where I'm off on some solo trip, 'cause I think that's really boring" [Guitar Player, December 1991].
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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:52 pm

NOVEMBER 23, 1999 - THE RELEASE OF 'LIVE ERA'

Duff: "Yeah, we’ll doubtless record and video shows on the next tour. In fact, we’ve already done some dates in Japan that way" [Raw Magazine, July 1989].
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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri Feb 08, 2019 10:57 pm

GOING SOLO

Band members quickly realized that they had musical ambitions that went beyond the confinements of "Guns N' Roses".

In 1988, Axl would dismiss the possibility of doing a solo record:

I hope I'll be really satisfied after [releasing the follow-up to Appetite]. I don't want to go solo, but there are areas I'd like to explore - maybe movies - where I might not be able to stay in the band to do it[Musician, December 1988].
But in 1989 the tune had changed:

I want to do five records in two years[RAW Magazine, May 1989].
And those five records were, as written by Raw Magazine, "the next studio one (possibly a double), the live one, his own solo LP plus two EPs, firstly a Punk covers record and, secondly, another acoustic set, this time with X-rated versions. And then there's the films..."[RAW Magazine, May 1989].

He would further elaborate on a solo record in 1990:

I can imagine finding people that play really good that I want to do songs with and see about possibly putting a solo project together at some point, but not getting the same effect. But I can't really see trying to duplicate what Guns N’ Roses is, because Guns N’ Roses is so much more than we ever thought it really would be[MTV Famous Last Words, August 1990].
Slash would also entertain the possibility of doing a solo record:

I plan on doing one one day. I'm sure [Axl] does as well[Circus Magazine, May 1989].
By August 1991, Slash would state that he intended to do a record with another band if Guns N' Roses experienced a long downtime:

But if we take a long hiatus again, I'd like to put out, not really a solo record, but something with another band—a temporary thing that I'd control. It would be geared towards an almost heavy metal funk-rock concept—music with killer rock and roll vocals and the most awesome riffs. Almost like "Jungle," only a little bit tighter and heavier. A long time ago, Aerosmith got close; Beck has a couple of magic moments too. But I don't want it to be a guitar record where I'm off on some solo trip, 'cause I think that's really boring[Guitar Player, December 1991].
In 1992 he was asked about a solo record again:

Ha! As far as me doing my own thing, I haven’t given it much thought because I’ve been too busy concentrating on Guns. It’s kept me pretty occupied and I can’t really look at anything other than day by day, that way I don’t get any nasty surprises when things fuck up![Raw Magazine, March 4, 1992].
But the first one out was Duff. In 1991, he had started working on his solo record. As reported by The Seattle Times: "While here next week, McKagan will spend a day recording a song dedicated to Wood at a local studio, working with local musicians. It's for a solo album he hopes to release later this year. Lenny Kravitz and Sebastian Bach have already recorded tunes with him, and he's asked Prince to join him in L.A. in two weeks to complete the project" [The Seattle Times, July 1991]. In October 1991, it was reported that Duff had "already signed the deal with Geffen, has got Lenny Kravitz involved and says Prince might sing on several tracks" [VOX, October 1991].

I got Lenny Kravitz, he’s singing one song. And Sebastian from Skid Row, he’s going to sing on another song. Slash is putting some leads on here and there. And Prince, hopefully he wants to do it. He’s like an inspiration to me as far as songwriting goes, big time. It’s turning out pretty cool. I’ve got eight tracks done, all my tunes[Circus Magazine, November 1991].
In February 1992, Duff would say the record was coming out in the summer and that it was on Geffen [Video Interview, February 1992]. The same month, Slash was asked about Duff' solo record:

[…] it’s not so much a solo record as a record [Duff] did working with all kinds of different people. It’s one of those records which came from the fact that he had a load of songs hanging around. He started recording it when me and Axl were doing guitar and vocals on the last album and he had dead time. He was just keeping busy. It’s gonna come out after the tour’s over. It sounds pretty good some of it although I haven’t heard the whole thing. There’s a song on there that I have to play on. It’s got to get finished[Raw Magazine, March 4, 1992].
It's basically something I wanted to do since I started playing guitar. We had some down time last spring, before we hit the road, so me and [producer/engineer] Jim Mitchell started cutting tracks. I play drums, bass and rhythm guitars. Slash plays some lead, I play some lead and Snake [Dave Sabo, from Skid Row] plays some lead. Sebastian [Bach] sings one song. It's working out very cool. We're recording it here and there, no big rush. The working title of the record is Believe in Me. It's different from a Guns N' Roses record, because it's stuff that I've written all on my own, a lot of times when I was alone. There's a lot of heavy Duff-isms. […] This is something I've always wanted to do. And it's not to differentiate myself from Guns N' Roses. I've wanted to do this since before Guns, but now I have the opportunity and the resources. Hey, I'm not trying to depart from GN'R - everyone knows that - it's just my own little trip. You know, I've been touring since I was 15, and I'm 27 now. The time is right[RIP Magazine, March 1992].
For the April issue of Guitar for the Practising Musician, Duff would discuss his solo record and say he intended to release it in the summer or fall because he wanted to tour it together with Slash:

I got a solo deal with Geffen. The record's called Believe in Me. I recorded the majority of it while we were on the road, which kept it pretty fresh. I've been recording all over the place, from London to Seattle. I did some drum and piano tracks in Dallas for a song called "Lonely Tonight," where I went in after we played three hours. It was four in the morning and I recorded till one or two in the afternoon. […] At first I was going, 'Okay, we'll try doing it this way.' Jim, who engineered the Guns N' Roses record, is co-producing it with me. I didn't know if it would work or not, or if you'd be able to tell by the tracks that I was tired. But you get a second, third or fourth wind, and it puts you in this state of mind. I don't know how to explain it, but it's great. Matt played drums on one song. Rob Affuso from Skid Row did drums on one song. I did drums on the rest of them. Bas sang on one song when we were in London, and Rob played drums in Denver and Snake played guitar on one song. I pulled some real bluesy stuff out of him that he didn't realize he had. I turned off all the lights and lit some candles. It's piano, bass, and just a kick and a snare. It's real bluesy, low, subtle. We just got him in the mood. It took a wile but he just let go. I said to him, just pretend you're on a porch somewhere. […] I'm almost done recording, but I'm not going to release it till late summer or early fall, because I'm going to tour on it. I'll play rhythm guitar and sing, Slash is going to play lead, Mac will play drums, and this guy London McDaniel is going to play bass. Teddy, who plays with us now, is gonna play keyboards, sax and harmonica[Guitar for the Practising Musician, April 1992].
This has been a dream of mine, since I was 15, to do something myself. I was always a big Prince fan, especially of the early stuff, like Dirty Mind, that he did by himself. Now I'm afforded the chance to do it. Some of the songs are bits and pieces of stuff I've written years ago. I have an 8-track up at my house, and I've got 40 or 45 complete songs[Guitar for the Practising Musician, April 1992].


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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Sat Feb 09, 2019 12:55 am

THE BUSINESS SIDE OF THINGS II

Slash: "You know, as far the business side of things go we have to be able to get up in the morning and do shit, otherwise it just flies over your head and it’s too late. I’m constantly on top of it and Axl is too on a daily basis. It never stops. It’s cool because I’m in my element and I enjoy it. […] normally we wouldn’t talk about it, but since we’re getting picked apart so much we might as well tell people what goes on. It’s a huge contrast to when we’re on stage. It has nothing to do with music. I’ve always done business for the band ever since we started. It’s just the way I am. I dig the challenge of doing the business as much as I like to Rock out. I’ll take the latter over the former any day, but someone has to do. If you want something to be done you have to do it yourself. Our manager (Doug Goldstein) is great but you have to communicate what you want because his final decision may not be the right decision for what we do as a group. Financially it may be, but not as far as what you believe in as a Rock band" [Raw Magazine, March 4, 1992].

Slash: "The last tour we did cost us two million dollars and we didn’t make a penny off the tour except for maybe the ‘T’-shirts that we sold. The truth is that I’m still watching my money. We put so much back into the group that we won’t really see anything until a long time down the line when we’ve sold records consistently. We haven’t even re-negotiated our contract so that might never happen. To me that means I still feel the same as I always have. I’m happy though, but it’s like that old Jimi Hendrix quote which goes ‘The more money have, the more Blues you can sing’. People like to see the glamour that surrounds bands. They like to think that that’s what it’s all about and it isn’t" [Raw Magazine, March 4, 1992].

Slash: "One of the few indulgences is getting drunk. Otherwise we’re always working. I get up in the morning, and I know this is gonna sound terrible, but I get on the fuckin’ phone to take care of business and get more dates, dealing with promoters and shit. Being on stage is great, the travelling is fine, but doing what we do is far from glamourous and I think people probably wouldn’t last five minutes doing what we do. I don’t mean that to sound bitter because it isn’t, but there’s times when we’re slaving away and we can’t even get jet-lag anymore because we just don’t sleep. At the same time people have paid to come and see us and they don’t give a shit and you’ve got to be able and deliver every night, whether you’re sick or not. There’s no work compensation in this business. I’m not knocking people who lead regular lives because that’s their choice and they probably complain in the same way as anyone else, but we ain’t just out here living an easy life" [Raw Magazine, March 4, 1992].
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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Sat Feb 09, 2019 3:32 am

GUNS N' ROSES AND NIRVANA

Slash talking about the rumored tour with Metallica and the possibility of Skid Row being part of it:

Well, I don’t think the Skids are gonna be on it. We’re talking about doing it with Nirvana but we need to see where those guys are at. Metallica, Nirvana and us sounds pretty good to me. I went and saw Nirvana last night and they’re pretty good friends of mine so hopefully that’ll help even though we’re very different bands [Raw Magazine, March 4, 1992].
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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Sat Feb 09, 2019 8:55 pm

THE F@*!ING VIDEOS

A chapter about the music videos and what they meant.

In the March issue of RIP Magazine it was said that the band planned a documentary detailing the making of the music video for 'Don't Cry' that "will answer all the questions about the clip and what it all means" [RIP Magazine, March 1992]. It was also said that Axl "wants to experiment with music, film and video, and produce clips that will no doubt redefine the genre for the MTV generation" [RIP Magazine, March 1992].
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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Sat Feb 09, 2019 11:44 pm

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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Sun Feb 10, 2019 4:46 am

THE UNRELEASED ALBUM

After the release of 'The Spaghetti Incident!?' in 1993, Guns N' Roses would not release a new album until 'Chinese Democracy' in 2008. But the band hoped to work on new, original music already in 1991:

Axl: We’re already starting to work on new material now with an 8-track on the road, and hopefully we can fire something out by the end of this, rather than wait forever [MTV, May 1991].

Slash: Yeah, we were talking about getting right in the studio [after the release of the Illusions] and doing another one. Just eight or nine, ten songs, you know? [RAW, October 1991].

In addition, the band would claim they had many songs and song ideas not used after releasing the 'Use Your Illusion' albums:

Axl: "No, we started with 56 songs… […] ... you know, and we cut it down to 30. And we decided which ones were important out of that, and kind of put different things on the side, on the shelf, that we weren’t really into, and recorded the most important ones now. And we kinda wanted to get things - we wanted to clean the closet, you know. Because when we set out to make Appetite, we had some of these songs already then, and we wanted to get rid of all those songs so that we could have - be fresh to start, and whatever we do next time is brand new for us. […] I have no idea [what we are going to do with them]. There’s just parts and stuff. And we kinda like took the best things from those. Slash is, though, one who really has a backlog of some material, and I don’t know what he plans to do with that" [Rockline, November 27, 1991].

Axl talking about how he has changed through therapy:

Axl: "I really think that the next official Guns n' Roses record, or the next thing I do, at least, will take some dramatic turns that people didn't expect and show the growth. I don't want to be the twenty-three-year-old misfit that I was. I don't want to be that person" [Rolling Stone, April 2, 1992].


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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Sun Feb 10, 2019 5:02 am

NOVEMBER 23, 1993 - THE RELEASE OF 'THE SPAGHETTI INCIDENT!?'

Axl talking about why they wanted to release a punk rock cover record:

Axl: You know, I’ve got made fun of for liking The Ramones. And then, you know, eight years go by and then everybody that was making fun of me is sitting around watching Rock ‘N’ Roll High School - and loving it. And I want a lot of these people to hear songs that they didn’t hear. I mean, there’s selected cuts that you can’t really find the original recordings that they’re on, and B-sides and stuff of songs we think really rocked and way, way influenced us. And we also do a tribute to Steve Bators. We did Ain’t It Fun with Mike Monroe, and it was really strange because when we did it, you know, both of us in certain places, without even trying I ended up sounding a bit like Steve, you know. Candles would flicker and bells would ring for no reason, and we’re like, “Steve’s here.” (Chuckles) [MTV, May 1991].
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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Fri Feb 15, 2019 7:31 pm

I will just archive this quote for the future, probably where I will discuss Slash alleged objection to change in musical style:

Slash: "I love playing ballads, I have to admit. It gives me a chance to express a bit more of the subtle and slower side of my playing" [Guitar for the Practising Musician, April 1992].
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Re: THE HISTORY OF GUNS N' ROSES - IN THEIR OWN WORDS

Post by Soulmonster on Sat Feb 16, 2019 9:41 pm

ACCOLADES

Another chapter I haven't really decided where to place. It's about the musical skills of the band members. I mean, GN'R was popular because of their songs, but individually, band members have been praised as musicians, especially Axl and Slash. So this chapter will deal with that, praise from others (non-band members) and their own words.

Axl

I’ve been singing since I was five years old. I sang in church from the age of five until I was 15. It was a Pentecostal holy roller church, eight miles out in the country. I played the piano in church [Spin, January 1988].[/i]
I grew up as a kid listening to Elvis Presley and gospel records, you know, and then when I got older I got into greatest hits in the 70s and all that stuff, and I played piano for years so I was really into anything to do with piano, Elton John and Billy Joel and stuff like that. But then when I started singing, you know, hardcore rock and roll I was really into Dan McCafferty of Nazareth [Unknown UK source, June 1987].[/i]
Despite this, according to Spin in May 1988, Axl never wanted to be a singer "because he didn't like his voice" [Spin, May 1988].

I'm like a second baritone, and I just worked on widening my range, to get a high range. And so then I just try to find the way to use it. Use the whole thing rather than limit myself [Headbanger's Ball, May 1988].
One of Axl's great strengths as a singer is his versatility:

[…] it was a challenge to write a song that I could use the low voice in. Because sometimes we'd write a song and when I started singing it in the lower voice, it was like we'd stop and say "That's out. It's not going to sound right." Eventually, we came up with "It's So Easy," and it just happened to sound right. It reminded me of Iggy Pop and stuff. So that's how that came about. And Mr. Brownstone" reminded me of the Stones, and I always liked making fun of Mick Jagger in the studio and playing around with it and stuff - and people seemed to like it. So it was like "Whoa OK, I'll work on this." So I worked on the vocal awhile until I was happy with it [Cream, September 1989].
Slash

For me, it's like certain compliments come from different sources and I take them in different ways... Like, getting Best Guitarist in Kerrangl- that right there is one of the all-time greatest compliments, right? […] And then not only does t happen, but I find out Gibson's putting out a Slash model Les Paul... And this is all completely fuckin' amazing stuff that I would never have dreamed of happening to me when I was a kid! […] But instead of letting it go to my head, the way I honestly feel about it is, like; really don't see my playing as being truly worth that, y'know? I tend to put it down to record sales and 'cause it's hip to like Guns N' Roses right now. […] I mean, it would be a real joke if I was to start thinking of myself as the world's best guitarist, because that's just not true, and I should know... […] I mean, God, I would hope I'm twice the guitarist now than I was when we recorded the first album. But in another way, it gives me the energy and motivation to really play my ass off on this next record, so I can at least prove myself of being even just a little bit worthy of all the praise and attention I've had and the band's had this last year or so. […] It's fatal to believe in your own hype... I've seen it happen to people in other bands - they win some poll and immediately they start walking around thinking they're the fuckin' greatest! Believing too much in your own image - it's instant brain death [Kerrang! April 1989].[/i]
You know, I've been voted 'Best Guitarist' in the polls conducted by a number of magazines across the world. But this doesn't mean I'm the best in the world. It's simply that my band is really popular [RAW Magazine, May 1989].[/i]
We were never really thought of as a band that was musically gifted. We were just another one of those loud rock ’n’ roll bands that fall over on stage and they’re funny. At this point in time, I think we’ve gotten past those hurdles, where we can express ourselves and people are actually listening. […]I’m no longer just the guy that said f— on TV. I’m a guy who can actually play [St. Petersburg Times, December 27, 1991].[/i]
After the release of the 'Illusions', Slash would get a lot of praise in credible magazines like Guitar Player and Guitar World:

Being called "the father of the back-to-basic movement of guitar playing: I don't feel that way. I'm real proud of the work that went into these records, although most of the stuff was spontaneous. The guitar parts on Appetite were more worked out. With Illusion, I just did the guitar lines the day we recorded. In order to give each song its own unique quality, I'd do all the overdubs for one song before moving on to the next. And to this day I can't remember some of what I played. I can't duplicate it live. So I feel puny as a guitar player. I like what I do and I know where it comes from, and I'm proud of the fact that it is for real. But I'm way far removed from feeling like the father of anything [Guitar World, February 1992].[/i]
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