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SoulMonster

1991.07.16 - Tacoma Dome, Tacoma, WA

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1991.07.16 - Tacoma Dome, Tacoma, WA

Post by Soulmonster on Mon Aug 13, 2012 12:16 am

Date:
July 16, 1991.

Venue:
Tacoma Dome.

Location:
Tacoma, WA, USA.

Setlist:
01. Perfect Crime
02. Mr. Brownstone
03. Nightrain
04. Live And Let Die
05. Bad Obsession
06. Dust N' Bones
07. Double Talkin' Jive
08. Civil War
09. Patience
10. November Rain
11. You Could Be Mine
12. 14 Years
13. Welcome To The Jungle
Godfather Theme
14. Rocket Queen
15. Knockin' On Heaven's Door
16. Sweet Child O' Mine
ENCORE:
17. Estranged
18. Paradise City

Line-up:
Axl Rose (vocals), Izzy Stradlin (rhythm guitarist), Slash (lead guitarist), Duff McKagan (bass), Dizzy Reed (keyboards) and Matt Sorum (drums).

Next concert: 1991.07.17.
Previous concert: 1991.07.13.
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Re: 1991.07.16 - Tacoma Dome, Tacoma, WA

Post by Soulmonster on Tue May 13, 2014 7:09 pm

Preview in The Seattle Times, July 12, 1991:

On The Stage And Off, These Guys Are Hot -- Smokin' Guns

By Patrick Macdonald

The first time Guns N' Roses played here, fewer than 20 people showed up. That was in 1985 at the old Gorilla Gardens near Pioneer Square, and it was the band's first show outside its hometown of Los Angeles.

On Tuesday, the band plays the Tacoma Dome and all 15,000 tickets have long been sold out.

A lot has happened to GN'R in the intervening years - like becoming the biggest rock band in the world. It has also become the most controversial, with trouble stalking its every turn.

Not since the early days of the Rolling Stones has a band become more famous for its offstage behavior than its music. Bandmembers' struggles with alcohol and drugs, lead singer Axl Rose's manic depression (controlled by Lithium), in-fighting within the group and legal battles inside and outside the band have been aired publicly time and again.

Typically, the current tour has been marked by controversy, with reports of riots, arrests and increased security.

Little is said about the music, even though the band has sold 15 million copies of its only album, "Appetite for Destruction," and another 5 million of its eight-song EP, "GN'R Lies." The only other pieces of music it has released - a cover of Dylan's "Knockin' On Heaven's Door" from the "Days of Thunder" soundtrack, and "Civil War" from "Nobody's Child," the Romanian orphan-relief compilation - have also been big hits.

It's new single, the powerful "You Could Be Mine," from its forthcoming release of two albums in one day (set for Aug. 27), "Use Your Illusion" Vols. I and II, also looks like a hit. Featured on the soundtrack of "Terminator 2," the video of the song intercuts performance shots with action scenes from the movie, and includes Arnold Schwarzenegger as the Terminator stalking the band (he concludes they're not worth wasting bullets on.)

GN'R's music is the grittiest, most honest hard rock to hit the airwaves since glam bands and corporate heavy-metal took hold in the 1970s. Rock fans embraced the music long before lurid tales about the band began to surface, even before most people knew what the GN'R reprobates look like. When the savage "Welcome to the Jungle" and the warm rock ballad "Sweet Child O' Mine" hit the airwaves, hard-rockers sat up and took notice. Here was music to sink your teeth into, the kind of stuff that hadn't been heard since the heyday of Aerosmith, the Stones and Led Zeppelin.

What makes Guns N' Roses great is the band's open-throttled, no-holds barred, give-it-all-you've-got approach to every song. Rose is an amazing vocalist who growls, squeals, rasps, warbles and screams (he has more voices than Linda Blair in "The Exorcist"), in order to get his points across. He's fascinating to listen to because of the drama of his delivery, the earthy directness of his lyrics and the extent to which he is willing to take his voice. He also has a distinctive performing style, with his patented side-to-side sway and athletic dance moves.

Slash, the lead guitarist, works perfectly with Rose, much like Keith Richards with Mick Jagger. Like Richards, Slash (whose real name is Saul Hudson) comes up with the perfect solo to complement every song. He has a light touch, playing notes instead of chords, and showing influences ranging from classical to jazz and the whole vocabulary of rock guitar. It's not surprising he has been asked to play on a variety of other artists' albums, including recordings by Michael Jackson, Bob Dylan, Alice Cooper, Lenny Kravitz and Les Paul.

The curly-haired, often top-hatted guitarist presents an almost comical picture - Danny Sugarman, author of the forthcoming unauthorized biograpy, "Appetite for Destruction: The Days of Guns N' Roses," put it best when he described Slash as "a dark cross between the Mad Hatter and Cousin It."

Izzy Stradlin is the band's second guitarist, playing rhythm. Duff "Rose" McKagan, a former Seattleite who joined the band only days after he arrived in L.A., after answering an ad Slash placed in a music magazine, plays bass. Both he and Stradlin contribute to the songwriting. Steven Adler, the original drummer of the band, was kicked out because of drug problems and has been replaced by the thoroughly professional Matt Sorum, formerly of the Cult. Keyboardist Dizzy Reed is along for the tour but is not a permanent member.

The show is opened by the very hot Skid Row, whose latest album, "Slave to the Grind," made its debut at No. 1 on the Billboard Top Pop Albums chart two weeks ago. The flamboyant band, fronted by Canadian lead singer Sebastian Bach, is best known for the anthemic rockers "18 and Life" and "Youth Gone Wild."
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Re: 1991.07.16 - Tacoma Dome, Tacoma, WA

Post by Soulmonster on Tue May 13, 2014 7:26 pm

Review in The Seattle Times, July 17, 1991:

Energetic Guns N' Roses Leaves Fans With Many Sound Memories

By Patrick Macdonald

Guns N' Roses and Skid Row last night at the Tacoma Dome.

Guns N' Roses' first head-lining stadium tour finally hit its stride last night at the Tacoma Dome. The tour got off to a bad start earlier this month with some troubled shows, including one in St. Louis that ended in a riot in which 75 people were injured.

But last night that seemed far away as the band put on a spectacular 2 1/2-hour show that was one of the best concerts here in years. Axl Rose and his boys were full of energy, sprinting around the huge multileveled stage while delivering spirited, challenging, powerful rock 'n' roll.

Lead singer Rose pulled out all the stops, using the full range of his compelling voice to underscore the stark, sometimes agonizing images in his songs about contemporary life and relationships. He screeched and howled and wailed and rumbled, and sometimes sang tenderly, as in the new love song, apparently called "November Rain," during which he accompanied himself on grand piano.

He whirled around in a red kilt, his ponytail flying, later changed to bicycle shorts, donned an American flag for a show-stopping "Civil War," and at the end of the night jumped off the stage into the audience. It took several minutes, and a half-dozen beefy security men, to extricate him from the crowd. He complained that somebody tried to pull his pants off.

Never before has guitarist Slash seemed so central to the band's sound. He's impressive on the records, but last night he was brilliant, holding the whole thing together with spare, aching, fascinating, varied solos. He had the assurance and ease of masters like Eric Clapton and Keith Richards, combined with the crackling raw electricity of youth. He played bottleneck, blues, several snippets of Jimi Hendrix, and the theme from "The Godfather," along with some of the sweetest rock solos ever heard in these parts. The normally taciturn performer, who usually hides behind his mop of tangled curls, actually spoke a few times, saying the show and crowd were by far the best of the tour.

Bassist Duff McKagan, a Seattle native, also demonstrated his worth to the band with solid bass and lots of backup singing. Rhythm guitarist Izzy Stradlin was most visible in his role as a second lead singer, although his songs tended to be weaker than Axl's. New drummer Matt Sorum was thoroughly professional, and keyboardist Dizzy Reed, who Axl said was now a permanent member, added much to the songs with his rich, bluesy piano solos.

At least half the songs were new, from "Use Your Illusion" Volumes I and II, the two albums due out next month. Judging from last night's songs, the albums have more variety, and are more substantial, than previous releases, while just as powerful and uncompromising. Several of the songs, especially the driving "Double Talkin' Jive," the romantic epic "Estranged" and the dark "Bad Obsession," about addiction, rank with the best of GNR.

The group's biggest hits, "Welcome to the Jungle" and "Sweet Child O' Mine," are at least five years old, but it was obvious the band is not tired of them. They were highlights of the set, along wih "Patience," "Paradise City" and Dylan's "Knockin' on Heaven's Door." Paul McCartney's "Live And Let Die" seemed an odd cover - it was too clean, too pop for GNR.

The St. Louis riot did have its effect last night - at one point Rose stopped the show, and threatened to end it, when a bottle rocket hit the ceiling. He referred to St. Louis several times, blaming the stadium management and police there for the riot, saying he and the band had nothing to do with it. And, of course, security was tight inside and outside the dome, with police everywhere, lots of extra fencing and barriers for crowd control, and thorough searches at the door.

The show was opened with an unusually long set by hard-driving Skid Row. The band, whose new "Slave to the Grind" LP shot to No. 1 its first week out, tried hard to show it was rebellious, but came off more like petulant children.
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Re: 1991.07.16 - Tacoma Dome, Tacoma, WA

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