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SoulMonster

1992.07.29 - Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, USA

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1992.07.29 - Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Tue Feb 07, 2012 5:32 am

Date:
July 29, 1992.

Venue:
Giants Stadium.

Location:
East Rutherford, USA.

Setlist:
01. Nightrain
02. Perfect Crime
03. It's So Easy
04. Mr. Brownstone
05. Live and Let Die
06. So Fine
07. Attitude
08. Bad Obsession
09. Double Talkin' Jive
10. Civil War
11. Patience
12. Welcome to the Jungle
13. Rocket Queen
14. You Could Be Mine
15. November Rain
16. Sweet Child O'Mine
17. Knockin' On Heaven's Door

Line-up:
Axl Rose (vocals), Gilby Clarke (rhythm guitarist), Slash (lead guitarist), Duff McKagan (bass), Dizzy Reed (keyboards) and Matt Sorum (drums).

Quotes:
At the Giants Stadium show at the end of July, Axl barely made it through the set due to the state of his voice. He was adviced by his doctor to rest it for a week, so we cancelled the next three dates [Slash's autobiography, "Slash", 2007, p. 358]
Next concert: 1988.08.08.
Previous concert: 1992.07.26.


Last edited by Soulmonster on Thu Sep 06, 2012 8:31 am; edited 3 times in total
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Re: 1992.07.29 - Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, USA

Post by 666 on Tue May 15, 2012 4:20 am

Was at this show. Axl left the stage midway thru KOHD claiming he got hit by a lighter and he never returned. Long fucking day. Faith No More opened. Long wait in between for Metallica who then played for over 3 hours. Then a looooong wait for GNR and then Axl leaving early left a bad taste in everyone's mouth. The crowd was definitely thinned by the time GNR came on. More of a Metallica crowd for sure.

I saw the same show a few days previous. Same type of thing. More of a Metallica crowd and by the time GNR came on, thousands of people had left and those that stayed were relatively quiet. I never thought GNR and Metallica were a good mix to tour. Metallica were on top of their game at that point and were blowing GNR away.
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Re: 1992.07.29 - Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Tue May 15, 2012 4:42 am

Thanks for sharing that. Do you agree with Slash about Axl's voice being shot?
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Re: 1992.07.29 - Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, USA

Post by 666 on Tue May 15, 2012 4:48 am

I can't say that I remember but I saw them 3 times on the UYI tour and we've all heard how his voice was then. Most people think that was his high point live but at the same time, his voice sounds ripped to shreds. Listen to when he would do the intro before SCOM--it might have sounded cool but it also sounded as if he swallowed glass.

I will say this though--despite how "shot" his voice sounded then, he was always in key unlike 2001-the present.
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Re: 1992.07.29 - Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Tue May 15, 2012 5:02 am

Heh, I was always a bit ambivalent about that chainsaw voice myself. I think he sings much better today without that excessive rasp, although I am not particularly fond of the really aerial, thin voice he sometimes produces when he sings in the really high register. It needs some fattening up, but not necessarily with rasp.
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Re: 1992.07.29 - Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, USA

Post by 666 on Tue May 15, 2012 5:05 am

Technically speaking, he is a much better singer now than he was then but for some reason or another, it seems he cannot make it thru a whole concert with a quality voice.

The really high pitch though is nothing new. Listen to the Hollywood Rose stuff or the AFD demos and it's there. I personally think the rasp happened because of damage to his voice and/or touring excessively and being tired. That's an opinion based on no scientific knowledge though haha.
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Re: 1992.07.29 - Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Tue May 15, 2012 5:15 am

Yeah, it's odd how quickly his voice can go from bad to good during a show. I guess some old songs are just too hard for him now.
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Re: 1992.07.29 - Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, USA

Post by 666 on Tue May 15, 2012 5:20 am

The one song that he's consistently good on is KOHD. He uses his nasal voice for the verses which puts no strain on his vocal cords at all. He usually sounds pretty good on the sing along parts.
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Re: 1992.07.29 - Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Wed May 07, 2014 10:08 pm

Review in Los Angeles Times, August 9, 1992:

POP MUSIC : Rock's Dream Team : They said the Guns N' Roses/Metallica tour could never happen, but the bands worked it out over dinner at Le Dome
August 09, 1992|ROBERT HILBURN | Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic. and

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — The 48,000 rock fans at Giants Stadium are impatient as the clock moves past the midnight hour. It has been almost 90 minutes since Metallica ended its blistering set, yet there is still no sign of Guns N' Roses.

"Where the hell is Axl?" shouts a young man wearing a bright new Guns N' Roses T-shirt.

Other fans near him raise their fists as if also demanding an answer.

"Yeah," screams another youth. "Maybe he's in jail in St. Louis."

The fans nearby howl with laughter.

The truth is most Guns N' Roses concerts have proceeded without incident since the "Use Your Illusion" tour began more than a year ago, but a few highly publicized accounts of lead singer Axl Rose's going on stage late--or leaving it early--have made fans of the Los Angeles-based hard-rock band ready for anything.

It was, in fact, an early exit during a St. Louis-area concert last summer that contributed to a riot that resulted in misdemeanor assault charges being filed against Rose. An Oct. 13 court date has been scheduled.

But tonight's delay has nothing to do with Rose, a fact that contributes greatly to the backstage calm of Guns N' Roses' manager Doug Goldstein.

The reason for the long time between acts, he says, is the unusual nature of this historic tour featuring America's two leading hard-rock bands, the '60s equivalent of a Rolling Stones/Who package.

Because each group could headline stadium tours on its own, rock insiders and fans were surprised last spring when they announced they would tour together this summer--a journey that includes stops Friday at Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego and Aug. 22 at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena.

Because it is such a rare pairing, the tour--like the current "Lollapalooza" traveling festival concept--is being watched closely in a concert industry that has found in the '90s that it is not recession-proof after all.

"I think this tour will have a huge effect," said Gregg Perloff, president of Bill Graham Presents, the San Francisco-based concert production firm. "You have two major headliners playing together in a historic package. Other acts who normally tour alone are going to look at what is happening here and think it makes sense for them, too.

"This tour is a return to the spirit of the '60s and '70s, when you had lots of bands playing together . . . a time when you could see the Who and the Grateful Dead together.

"I'm also excited about the 'Lollapalooza' concept, which mixes music with other elements, from performance art to crafts, and allows greater socialization . . . something you can do every year, like going to the state fair."

As he sits in a production office at Giants Stadium, Goldstein explains the delay in Guns N' Roses' taking the stage: "The wait isn't because anybody is late. It is because each band is doing a full show, which means we have to take down all the Metallica equipment, which is three truckloads of gear, before ours goes up.

"We could have cut a lot of corners--and saved a lot of money--if each band did shorter sets and used the same (staging), but the whole idea was to make this tour unique. The only reason it's happening at all is that the bands wanted to put on the kind of show that they loved when they were teen-agers themselves."

And why haven't we seen more dual headline tours in recent years?

Goldstein smiles.

"I could probably give you a hundred reasons," he says. "But it really boils down to two: ego and greed."

They said it would never happen.

That's the provocative line used in some ads for the 24-date Guns N' Roses/Metallica package--provocative because it is true on many levels.

First, there's the matter of ego.

Regardless of how you try to neutralize the issue by advertising the tour as a "co-headlining" affair, the closing act is invariably looked upon by most fans as the real headliner--therefore the more important or popular band.

So, the first question to be resolved on a dual headline tour is: Who agrees to go on first?

Then there's the money.

The rule of thumb in rock is that a headliner receives about 60% of the gate at a stadium show. If you figure a gross of $1.2 million for a stadium date, Guns N' Roses or Metallica would walk away with about $720,000 if they headlined their own shows.

But production costs escalate on a twin-headline event, so the headliners on a Guns/Metallica-type bill will walk away with $500,000--or about $250,000 each, according to one insider's estimate. That's a handsome $6 million when multiplied by 24, but far less than the potential $17.2 million from a solo stadium tour.

On that basis, Guns N' Roses and Metallica are doing the stadium shows for about the same money each receives for a successful show in a much smaller arena.

Other questions raised by the tour:

- Were the bands compatible? Metallica's mostly male heavy-metal fans may get into a turf war with Guns N' Roses' more mainstream (and co-ed) hard-rock fans. That could lead city officials around the country to worry about crowd control.
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Re: 1992.07.29 - Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Thu May 08, 2014 12:15 am

Review in Los Angeles Times, August 1, 1992:

Rockin' With Axl, Bruce, Metallica . . .
POP BEAT
August 01, 1992|ROBERT HILBURN | TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Two of the year's most important pop tours crossed paths here this week, leaving audiences not only with lots of memories, but with a few questions.

* Who walks away the winner in the much-heralded Guns N' Roses-Metallica matchup?

* Is it possible for Axl Rose to get through an entire performance without some kind of incident?

* Is Bruce Springsteen, blessed with two albums' worth of strong new material, playing it too safe by devoting half his time on stage to old songs?

* Or is it asking too much of his longtime fans to do without both the E Street Band and "Hungry Heart" in Springsteen's first U.S. tour in more than four years?

First, the Guns/Metallica show, a 7 1/2-hour affair that lasted until 2:35 a.m. Thursday morning at Giants Stadium in the Meadowlands complex across the Hudson River from New York City.

Though both groups express admiration for each other in interviews and strenuously deny any "battle of the bands" rivalry on a tour headed toward Southern California, it's hard to imagine the 48,000 fans at the show not filling out personal score cards on the way home. Picking a favorite is part of the fun of this rare pairing of two stadium-caliber acts.

The long affair started off with a winning 45-minute set by Faith No More, a band that shows considerable independence and integrity in its new album, "Angel Dust."

Rather than race after easy sales by churning out clones of the song "Epic," which made its last album a runaway bestseller, the San Francisco-area quintet moves in interesting, if less accessible new directions in the album. While sacrificing some immediate sales, Faith No More may be building a more solid foundation for itself.

Metallica, which followed at Giants Stadium with a 2 1/4-hour set, already has a solid foundation, thanks to a series of albums and performances in the '80s that established the quartet as a sort of thinking man's heavy metal band.

Without abandoning the intensity and relentless assault associated with the genre, Metallica has written songs that moved, musically and lyrically, beyond the bombast and cliches of basic metal.

Still, there isn't a lot of range to a Metallica performance, especially in a stadium where the emphasis is on power, not nuance. In a stadium setting where many mainstream hard-rock fans may be seeing the group for the first time, this could be a severe limitation.

But Metallica--one of rock's most consistent entries--played with such lean, persuasive force Wednesday that even the mainstream fans appeared caught up in the power and precision of the group.

In the closing barrage of tunes--including the accessible "Nothing Else Matters," "One" and "Enter Sandman"--the band stepped up an even more dynamic level, matching sonically the fireworks extravaganza that accompanied some of these tunes.

When lead singer James Hetfield raised his hand in salute to the wildly enthusiastic audience at the end of the stirring set, there was some question whether even a band as seductive as Guns N' Roses could successfully follow Metallica.

For one thing, Guns is a much less consistent band than Metallica, one controlled on stage by the emotional mood of Axl Rose. When on target, it can be the most captivating band in American rock. But there were some nights on its lengthy arena tour when it was discouragingly flat.

An added handicap Wednesday: the show's length. Guns didn't go on until after midnight and it was easy to picture some of the weary Metallica fans heading for the exits early, especially on a weeknight.

Yet Guns lived up to the challenges, holding the crowd to the end with a blistering performance, complete with literal and figurative fireworks of its own. Rose seemed especially comfortable and confident, racing around the stage with his normal intensity, alternating vocally between his patented shrieks and tender crooning. The rest of the band, notably guitarist Slash, also seemed inspired.

As the concert headed toward a spectacular finale, however, it came to an abrupt halt when Rose stormed off the stage during the group's version of Bob Dylan's soothing "Knockin' on Heaven's Door."

The rest of the band continued playing for almost five minutes with bassist Duff McKagan taking over the vocals before announcing that Rose had left the stage because he had been hit in the groin by a lighter thrown from the audience. McKagan then announced the show was over--about two songs--or 10 minutes--ahead of schedule.

It's not uncommon for unruly fans at outdoor hard-rock shows to hurl objects, ranging from coins to fireworks, at the stage, and Rose has repeatedly warned audiences that he won't stand for it.

Crowd reaction was mixed.

There was some booing by fans who thought Rose was being a spoiled brat, which is how he is frequently portrayed in the press. Mostly, however, the crowd accepted the announcement and headed for the parking lot.

A band spokeswoman Friday announced that the lighter wasn't the only thing bothering the singer at Giants Stadium. He was also suffering from a severe sore throat. In fact, the group's next three concert stops were postponed because of the ailment.

So who was the winner?

In this case, both bands benefited from this unique pairing as the inherent competition brought out the best in them. The tour includes stops Aug. 14 at Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego and Aug. 22 at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena.

At Springsteen's concert Tuesday night at the Brendan Bryne Arena, also in the Meadowlands complex, he spotlighted 10 songs from the new "Human Touch" and "Lucky Town" albums in the first half of the three-hour-plus performance. They ranged from the rousing celebration of "Better Days" to the haunting drama of "Living Proof."

During this 70-minute sequence, Springsteen and his new band, complete with five backup singers, turned purposefully to old songs--including "Darkness on the Edge of Town" and "Badlands"--to comment on or clarify the feelings expressed in the new material.

But he only included four of the new songs in the 15-song second set, thus shifting the emphasis to the past. While some of these songs, including the acoustic "Thunder Road" and "Cover Me," still work in the context of the performance, some of the other choices, including "Bobby Jean" and "Hungry Heart," do not carry the contemporary revelation of such new material as "Book of Dreams" or "Real World."

Mostly, however, the show was classic Springsteen--still a man of considerable heart musically and supreme instincts as a performer. At times, you miss the various elements of the old E Street Band, especially Clarence Clemons' saxophone. At other times, however, the band performs the new material so well that the change of musicians isn't an issue.

The most moving moment in the show was perhaps the end when Springsteen closed with the haunting "My Beautiful Reward," a song of benediction from one of the new albums.

It was a moment as captivating as hearing "Born to Run" for the first time in the mid-'70s--and it is remarkable that he can continue to come up with moments like that after all these years. Tuesday's show was part of an 11-night run at the arena. Some of the 20,000 fans came to celebrate the old. The lucky ones realized that there is still much to enjoy and learn. The tour includes stops Sept. 24, 25 and 28 at the Los Angeles Sports Arena.
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