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SoulMonster

1991.07.02 - Riverport Amphitheatre, St. Loius, USA

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1991.07.02 - Riverport Amphitheatre, St. Loius, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Sat Dec 10, 2011 6:47 am

Date:
July 2, 1991.

Venue:
Riverport Amphitheatre.

Location:
St. Louis, USA.

Setlist:
01. Perfect Crime
02. Mr. Brownstone
03. Live and Let Die
04. Dust N' Bones
05. You Could Be Mine
06. Patience
07. Double Talkin' Jive
08. November Rain
09. Welcome to the Jungle
10. Civil War
11. 14 Years
12. Rocket Queen (stopped)

Line-up:
Axl Rose (vocals), Izzy Stradlin (rhythm guitarist), Slash (lead guitarist), Duff McKagan (bass), Dizzy Reed (keyboards) and Matt Sorum (drums).

Notes:

Quotes:
I regret what happened last night [KSHE-FM, July 3, 1991]
Fuck you St. Louis and God bless America! [Onstage Dallas, July 8, 1991]
Everybody thinks it is just because we were wimped out on photos being taken But you can only put up with so much shit from one or two members of the crowd. It's distracting to have flashbulbs go off in your face. They're not supposed to bring cameras, right? There was a handful of security guys who weren't paying attention to the audience at all. They were turned around - watching us. Axl told one guy, "If you don't take care of this, I will!" But the guy didn't react. I don't know if it was miscommunication or if he was just not interested. We've been jumping into crowds our whole career - that's how we do things. So Axl dived in to go after the flash. When we finally got him back onstage, he just walked off. We had already played an hour-and-a-half kick-ass set, but a couple of people started throwing things, and then someone jumped onto the stage - that brought out a few security guys. At that point, the crowd got off on rushing the authority and tearing up the amps - the whole fucking grandness of it. [...] We decided we were the only people who could take control, so we started to go back onstage. But by then the kit and all my cabinets were gone. These people were fucking ripping into the metal MESA/Boogie grilles to get to the speakers! Some guy ran off with a lot of guitars - they caught him. Our crew and our own security were the wall defending our equipment. Some of our guys got stitches. Backstage, there were people on stretchers, bleeding, and cops coming through on stretchers. It was real intense. [...] They rushed us out in a van, all huddled together. We saw cop after cop going in the opposite direction. They're trying to blame us for it, and in a small way, I'll say it was our fault, but there were so many other factors involved [Slash - The Hands Behind the Hype, December 1991]
That was something stupid. I won't comment on that because I don't want to be negative. It happened and it was ridiculous. There was people injured and that pissed me off a lot. I can't enjoy people being hurt in a show. That was bullshit! It was one of the worse nights, like the Donington show were those kids died. That was horrible [Popular 1, July 2000]
Y'know everybody is trying to pick on us because of the taking of the picture. But it wasn't about that really. It was one of those things that sorta built up. Okay, there were some security guys- we're talking about the front line house people right? And the guys are fucking standing there with their arms on the stage watching the band, okay? And there was this gang of guys, and they're taking pictures and shit. And Axl says to the security 'are you gonna do anything about it?' And the security are like 'Oh, yeah dude, rock 'n' roll man!' That's security. So Axl just decided to take care of it himself. He says, "Well, if you're not, I will!' That's Axl- bam, right in there. "We kept the suspense beat going, but when he got backstage, it was like "Fuck this" and he threw his mike down and walked off. That's just the way he is all right? It makes us look like a bunch of fucking pansies and that's not the case. It's like 'C'mon, there's a fucking rule. No cameras. Everybody's bootlegging us. Get the fucking guy and stop it.' I mean, there's enough people taping us and shit. They make a fortune. "I used to bootleg shit, I used to scalp tickets- I know! If we don't see it, then we don't see it. I don't give a fuck. I ain't crying. But if the guy's in the front row and it's like click, click, click, this flashing going on, you gotta tell the security to get the guy. "St. Louis turned into such a violent situation, y'know, we lost all our equipment. Like one of Izzy's cabinets we found out by the concessions stands! My amps were out on the lawn, monitor boards... I was wondering what the fuck would make anybody sit there and dig into a metal grate to get into the speakers in a speaker cabinet. And when we say the lighting truss, they stole half the guns logo. "There were cops. There was blood everywhere. And we had to sneak outta the gig. Y'know we tried to go back on, but the kit was down and that made us realize... it's just the band and the crowd. The more authority you stick in front of the crowd, the more cops and SWAT guys, even though they're doin' their job, the worse the crowd gets. Because we're a rebellious band and our fans are like "Fuck this! We'll kick your ass and we'll kick that guys ass and we'll storm this fucking thing", right? So we have to say 'OK, listen, just don't be an asshole okay? We're only a band, y'know We're as weak as the next guy and, y'know we're up here playing and it's a sensitive subject anyway [Metal Masters, 1992]
That was the most violent act I've ever witnessed in my life. But I could feel that something was going to happen long before the riot broke out. There was an unmistaken ugliness in the air that night. It broke out so fast that there were no way we could have stopped it. We were afraid that someone was going to die, ourselves included. We had hardly gotten off the stage when people started to tear the place apart. They brought down these huge stacks of speakers and completely ripped my amps to shreds. We had to hide in a van to escape from the parking lot, and even then we weren't sure that we were going to make it out of there[Guitar World, January 2000]
Axl had a beef with a guy in the first few rows who had a video camera. Axl mentioned it to the venue security and they did nothing about it. Their attitue and the guy's blatant disregard really set Axl off, so he jumped out into the crowd to take his camera away. When he jumped down, it was great, we kept playing that suspenseful riff that starts of "Rocket Queen," and I thought the whole moment was killer. When Axl got back onstage, everything felt triumphant for a second...then he grabbed the mike, said something like, "Because of the bullshit security, we're going home," slammed the mike own, and walked offstage.

The band kept going. We'd gotten good at improvising to fill dead space - drum solos, guitar solos, jams - we had a bag of tricks to keep things moving whenever Axl made a sudden exit. We kept jamming, and I went over to the side of the stage. "Where is he?" I asked Dough.

He looked at me with a pained expression. "He's not coming back."

"What do you mean he's not coming back?" I shouted, still playing the riff.

"There is no way he is coming back, " Doug said. "There's nothing I can do."

We were about ninety minutes into our set, which was our minimum, contractually, but the plan was to play a two-hour set and the crowd wasn't close to satisfied. They knew there was a lot more lfet. I would have done anything to get Axl back onstage at that point.

"Ask him again!" I yelled. "Find out if he's really not going to." I should have by Doug's expression that there was no use.

Once it was final, we had no choice: the band put down our gear, and it was like pulling the plug on the stereo - the song just ended on a question mark. That entire arena sat there expecting something to happen, but instead we walked offtstage without a word. And that set them off. We had no idea how much that set them off.

We all gathered in the dressing room, Axl wasn't there, and the mood was pretty solemn, to say the least. And that's when the racked started. We could hear this pounding; even through the doors, it sounded like mayhem. Axl suddenly came into the dressing room and said, "Let's go back on."

We went down the hallway toward the stage and it was like the scene in the Beatles' Yellow Submarine where they're walking through a hall and it's normal but every time they open a door there's a train coming at them or a cat screeching: we'd open a door and there was yelling, we'd open another and see people on stretchers, cops with blood all over them, gurneys everywhere, and pandemonium. At the time we were shooting a documentary, so we have a lot of it on film.

The St. Louis locals weren't having our cancellation - they tore the entire building apart; they did things that I didn't think were possible. It was daunting, if anything - we learned not to fuck around with crowds to that extent. Axl, at least, should have been more wary from that point on not to take an audience to that level of agitation ever again
[Slash's autobiography, p 339-340]
The show started about an hour late - which by this point almost counted as on time. We played about an hour and a half, and were in the middle of "Rocket Queen" when all hell broke loose. For reasons that don't matter - they were immediately eclipsed not only by the coverage of the incident but also in the moment, onstage, as events unfolded - Axl dove into the audience to try to address something the house security had not. His foray didn't last long, and I helped him upright as he lunged back onstage. He then strode to the mic and announced that because security hadn't done their job, he was leaving. He slammed the mic down and stormed off. We quickly followed.

For about ten minutes, we waited in the wing, unsure what to do. Since we all had our own dressing rooms and staff and Axl had hurried off to his, we didn't know whether or not he was planing to return. We thought he probably would. The crowd seemed to think so, too.

Unlike a lot of venues, this one had a huge set of sliding doors at the back of the stage tat could be closed and locked with chains. Most of the equipment not visible from teh audience was already in a position to be locked backstage. After that first ten minutes, the tone of the crowd changed and people began to throw stuff at the stage. The crew started to shift some of the items in front of our set out of harm's way - guitars, amp racks.

Every time crew members went out now to grab something, all sorts of shit rained down. It was coming steadily. Most dangerous of all were the venue's plastic chairs with pieces of their metal frames still attached. Those were heavy. I could hear the thuds and they landed on the stage and bounced off the walls. [...]

Axl re-emerged from his dressing room and we offered to go back out and play to calm things down. It was too late.

Security tried to push the crowd back from the stage with a fire hose. But the crowd got the hose and backed our entire crew, the house security, and all the local cops behind the sliding doors. Kids were climbing our hanging speaker towers, destroying our monitors, smashing lights.

We hunkered down backstage. We were lucky. In a lot of venues there is no chained door and the crowd would have taken over the entire venue. Once the gates were closed and the kids had the stage, the crew did not go back out - there was no reason for anyone to risk opening a door and poking their head out to see what was going on.

But we could hear it all. Screams, crashes, the thunder of thousands of feet. Boom, boom, boom, WHOOSH. Rumble, rumble, boom, AAAAAAAAAAAH! Shouts, more thunder, the scraping groan of large objects being pushed around.

Another twenty minutes went before forty or fifty police cars came screaming in and backup police stormed and retook the venue.

The band was shoved into a small van and told to get on the floor so we weren't visible. Slash's hat was sticking up. The driver asked him to take it off. When the van drove our of the enclosed part of the venue and into the parking lot, I could hear the mayhem had spread outside. As we pulled out of the parking lot, I peeked out the back window - I could see speaker cabinets and pieces of our pianos. Kids had gotten tired of carrying them or dumped them when the cops showed. Clots of cops ran around with batons and pepper spray. Kids ran this way and that. Medics rushed around treating bloodied fans. Police had people in cuffs. It looked like a war zone
[Duff's autobiography, "It's So Easy", 2011, p. 186-188]
Next concert: 1991.07.08.
Previous concert: 1991.06.30.


Last edited by Soulmonster on Wed May 07, 2014 6:42 am; edited 1 time in total
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Re: 1991.07.02 - Riverport Amphitheatre, St. Loius, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Wed May 07, 2014 6:40 am

GNR Tour Disrupted After Melee : Axl Rose Apologizes for Missouri Concert Riot
July 04, 1991|CHUCK PHILIPS | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES

Guns N' Roses canceled a concert tonight near Chicago after the rock group's sound equipment was destroyed during a melee Tuesday night following an abbreviated performance outside St. Louis.

"It was a full-fledged riot," Carl Middleman, a reporter for St. Louis radio station KSHE-FM, said Wednesday.

The disturbance erupted at the Riverport Amphitheater in Maryland Heights, Mo., about an hour and a half into the concert when Axl Rose, lead singer for the best-selling Los Angeles rock band, stormed off the stage.

Moments before, Rose--one of rock's most controversial and impulsive figures--dove from the stage in an effort to grab a concertgoer's video camera himself, according to an eyewitness. But the fan eluded him.

Rose then climbed back on stage. After chastising the security guards for allowing the camera in the arena, the rock singer threw down his microphone and walked away.

Police said that about 2,500 of the 19,000 fans then stampeded the stage, destroyed the band's drums and amplifiers, tore down chain-link fences, ripped shrubs out of the outdoor theater and demolished two large video screens.

"It was a total melee," said Middleman, who witnessed the incident from the 12th row of the amphitheater. "I don't know if Axl was provoked or not, but he seemed to fly off the handle. I think he could have handled himself better."

Maryland Heights (Mo.) Chief of Police Neil Kurlander was conducting an investigation Wednesday into the matter, but no charges against Rose or the band had been filed, according to the St. Louis County Prosector's office.

An estimated 60 people were injured, several having to be carried out on stretchers, according to Maryland Heights Police.

The number included 13 law enforcement officers, whose injuries ranged from a broken kneecap to cuts. Sixteen people were booked on suspicion of riotous behavior and released. Physical damage was estimated at more than $200,000.

According to the police report, it took an estimated 400 police with nightsticks and fire hoses about an hour and a half to bring the rioting fans under control.

But Rose, who left the amphitheater with his band as the disturbance grew, called KSHE-FM about two hours after the incident to express his concerns about the riot.

"I regret what happened last night," Rose told KSHE-FM deejay Jim Ellis.

In a statement to Associated Press after the incident, Maryland Heights police Sgt. John Wachter said, "This is the first incident we've seen in which a bandleader attacked someone in the crowd, and that is what precipitated the riot," Wachter said. "I know groups don't like to have (their pictures taken), but they should have exercised a little more judgment."

Along with numerous other bands, Guns N' Roses has frequently complained about unauthorized camera operators and photographers at concerts.

The band, whose first two albums have sold more than 12 million copies worldwide, has often made headlines on stage.

Two weeks ago, the band showed up 2 1/2 hours late for a performance at Long Island's Nassau Coliseum. An angry Rose then went into a tirade against the group's record label, Geffen Records, and various publications, including Rolling Stone magazine.

Last month, the hard-rock group was fined $5,000 when it ignored a curfew at an Indiana arena. Authorities said they acted mainly because of Indiana-native Rose's remarks to the crowd, in which he berated the "scared old people" of Indiana, and compared the state to a Nazi concentration camp.

Opening two years ago for the Rolling Stones at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, Rose threatened to quit the band, claiming drugs were destroying the group.

Earlier, some of the band's lyrics were criticized for being anti-homosexual and racist, though Rose denied the charges, insisting the lyrics in question were simply "social realism."

Rose was arrested last October for allegedly bashing a neighbor with a bottle, although prosecutors later dropped the case for lack of evidence.

Holly Huetter, spokeswoman for Chicago-based promoter JAM Productions, said the Guns N' Roses' show planned for tonight in Tinley Park, Ill., will be rescheduled.

The band hopes to have new equipment in place in time for its Kansas City date Friday, a Geffen spokeswoman said.

Guns N' Roses is scheduled to headline the Pacific Amphitheatre in Costa Mesa on July 25 and the Forum in Inglewood on July 29, 30, Aug 1 and 3.

"We have every intention of going on with the Guns N' Roses shows as scheduled," Claire Rothman, general manager of the Forum, said Wednesday."

Despite its controversial reputation, Guns N' Roses has been widely praised by some rock critics as the best entry in the long line of bands that deal with youthful aggression and rebellion in the tradition of the Rolling Stones and the Doors. Its tunes, ranging from "Welcome to the Jungle" and "Mr. Brownstone" to "Sweet Child o' Mine," touch on both the temptations and consequences of "fast-lane" behavior.

The group's snarling new single, "You Could Be Mine," is featured in the film "Terminator 2."
Source: Los Angeles Times, July 4, 1991.
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Re: 1991.07.02 - Riverport Amphitheatre, St. Loius, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Thu Apr 07, 2016 7:19 am

No St. Louis gig on the 2016 "Not In This Lifetime" tour:


Guns N’ Roses Won’t Make Up With St. Louis Just Yet

In 1991, Guns N’ Roses played an infamous show at the Riverport Amphitheatre, just outside St. Louis. While the band was performing, Axl Rose noticed a fan in the audience taking pictures. He tried to send security out to kick the fan out or to confiscate the camera, but he kept seeing the guy taking pictures. So eventually, Rose jumped into the crowd to attack the fan, and he ended up fighting with both audience members and security guards. When he got back onstage, he promptly stormed off, and the rest of the band joined him. The crowd that night, in what’s been dubbed the Riverfront Riot, tore the arena to pieces, resulting in 60 injuries and hundreds of thousands of dollars in damage. Rose was later charged with inciting a riot, though the charges were dropped.

After that show, GN’R continued to blame the city and the security for the riot. Rose wore a “St. Louis Sucks” shirt onstage, and the band included “FUCK YOU, ST. LOUIS” in the Use Your Illusion liner notes. Last week, the band announced the dates for its quasi-reunion tour, with Slash and Duff McKagan back in the fold for the first time in decades. When the band first announced the cities they’d visit on this tour St. Louis was on the list. But when they announced the actual dates, there was no St. Louis stop.

When it looked like they were actually coming, the city’s Riverfront Times wrote, with mixed feelings, about the idea that the band might return to the city. It won’t happen. The Riverfront Times now reports that the band wasn’t able to find a suitable venue in or near St. Louis:

Most tours of this magnitude are planned well in advance, but we’re working on GN’R time. GN’R has every intention of coming back but can’t make it happen on this tour… When Guns N’ Roses teased the 2016 tour last Friday, the actual tour routing was still in development, and the expectations was that all 21 cities would be included. Over the subsequent days as the routing and logistics were being finalized it became evident the calendar would not allow for the tour to make a stop in St. Louis.

A quick personal story here: My first concert was a year after the Riverfront Riot, and it was Guns N’ Roses, Metallica, and Faith No More on the Washington, DC opening date of what would become a massive and ill-fated stadium tour. I don’t know how I convinced my dad to take me to that; it involved something like straight A’s on my seventh-grade report card. My dad basically hates all rock music. This was a major coup.

Guns N’ Roses came onstage an hour and a half late, which was a thing they always did at the time, though I didn’t know that when I was 12. My dad kept itching to leave, saying they weren’t coming and there was about to be another riot. When they did finally make it onstage, the last Metro trains were about to leave, and we only got to stay for four or five songs. (I heard the opening notes of “Welcome To The Jungle” as we were walking across the parking lot. It was heartbreaking.)

But three songs into the show, I did get to see one classic, vintage Axl Rose moment, one that’s deeply inscribed on my memory. “They told me not to say anything derogatory about St. Louis,” Rose said. “Well, St. Louis can suck my dick.” He then went off on a long rant about how the city doesn’t know how to host a rock concert. My dad happens to be from St. Louis. And I just sat there, on pins and needles, watching his blood boil. It’s amazing to think that, 25 years after that St. Louis show, those tensions might still remain.

Source: http://www.stereogum.com/1869708/guns-n-roses-wont-make-up-with-st-louis-just-yet/news/


Last edited by Soulmonster on Thu Apr 07, 2016 8:17 am; edited 1 time in total
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Re: 1991.07.02 - Riverport Amphitheatre, St. Loius, USA

Post by denitza on Thu Apr 07, 2016 7:41 am

[quote="Soulmonster"]No St. Louis gig on the 2006 "Not In This Lifetime" tour:




2016 is correct :-)
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Re: 1991.07.02 - Riverport Amphitheatre, St. Loius, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Thu Apr 07, 2016 8:17 am

Doh!
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Re: 1991.07.02 - Riverport Amphitheatre, St. Loius, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Sat Jul 02, 2016 6:37 pm

Because of the riots at the St. Louis gig, the next scheduled gig on July 4 was cancelled:

Cancelled show, after St. Louis riot

It wasn't the first Chicago area show the band canceled over the years, but this show at the then-named World Music Theatre had to be postponed after the lead singer incited a riot at a St. Louis show two nights earlier, which injured 64 people and caused $200,000 in damage to the theater. This show wasn't canceled due to police fears of another riot, however, but because the band didn't have enough undamaged equipment to perform, according to a July 4, 1991, Tribune article.

Tinley Park
Source: http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/music/ct-guns-n-roses-chicago-htmlstory.html
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Re: 1991.07.02 - Riverport Amphitheatre, St. Loius, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Thu Jul 20, 2017 9:51 pm

Daniel Durchholz wrote:A letter to Axl Rose from a survivor of the ’91 riot

By Daniel Durchholz Special to Go! Magazine

Hi, Axl.

It’s been a long time. Twenty-six years. Twenty-six!

The last time I saw you, I was in the eighth row — what was left of it — at what was once called Riverport Amphitheatre. You were in the crowd, too, six or seven rows ahead of me, starting a fight with a motorcycle gang.

I think we can both agree that that is never a good idea, right?

Since we’ve never had the opportunity to talk, I wanted to write a note just to say thanks, because that night — as crazy and dangerous as it was, with all the injuries, destruction of property and psychic damage it wrought on your St. Louis fans and the city in general — was a great night for me.

At the time, I was an arts editor at the Riverfront Times and attended along with Thomas Crone, one of our staff writers. I wasn’t even covering the show, per se, but something told me I should be there and that I should bring along a reporter’s notebook, as well.

Those are common instincts for journalists, of course. Showing up is 80 percent of life, as Woody Allen reminds us. And though I was never a Boy Scout, I’ve always taken their motto, “Be prepared,” as gospel.

When the [stuff] hit the fan, though, and the concert erupted into a riot, the thing I was not ready for — because who would have expected it? — was that Crone and I would simply hang in there and report the story. Other journalists fled, leaving us as the only reporters on the inside of a major story that was unfolding right in front of us.

I can still remember certain details vividly: rioters swinging from cables under the light and speaker rigging on the stage, the sound engineer warning me there would be “massive death” if it fell down; police trying to hold the stage by shooting a fire hose at the crowd, though it lacked sufficient water pressure; a man jumping into the stream, then pulling down his pants and waving his penis at the cops.

Ah, good times.

There were other things, too: a man with a gash on his shoulder and blood on his face running madly up the aisle; another, his head strapped down, being carried out on a stretcher; Crone being viciously jabbed in the kidneys by police trying to clear the lower bowl as I shouted that we were members of the press.

The cops’ response was a string of vulgarities unfit for publication — here, anyway.

“We’re reporters, I pleaded.

“That’s nice,” another said, as they dumped us down a steep staircase.

He was right. It was nice, though it didn’t really seem so at that moment.

Because the RFT was a weekly newspaper — still is — and I’d have nowhere to publish my account of the riot until days later, I spent the rest of that night calling everyone I knew at Rolling Stone, MTV News and other media outlets. Breaking news just wants to be free, but this was in the pre-internet, pre-cellphone era, and I couldn’t just put it out there on social media.

In a long and convoluted way, which I won’t trouble you with here, I can say that the fact of my staying on the case that night and then fighting so hard to get the story out led to pretty much everything that has followed for me — a job editing a music magazine, writing books, doing radio and continuing to cover music even to this day. It’s been great.

What have you been up to since that time?

Oh yeah: “Chinese Democracy.” Well, nice going on that.

On the upside, I do have to say congrats for getting St. Louis’ own Richard Fortus in the band. He’s one of the best, which is something we knew even before you did. Well done.

And Tommy Stinson! A rock ’n’ roll hero if there ever was one. I’m sad he’s no longer with the group, but I was always glad to see him get a regular check courtesy of you. He deserved it.

Also, I’m glad to see you’re back with Slash, Duff, Dizzy and the other guys. This is how it should have been all along. There’s no recapturing those wasted years, but there’s still now, and we have to do the best we can with that, right?

I do have to say we’re still a little sore about that “(Expletive) you, St. Louis!” that you put in the liner notes of “Use Your Illusion.” But at the time, the feeling was probably mutual. So let’s just forget about that.

Meanwhile, welcome back to town. I trust the same thing won’t happen again. I know you said back in ’91 that people were throwing bottles at the band, and that’s what upset you. Fair enough. But it was someone taking pictures with an instamatic camera — remember those? — that actually set you off, and that’s why you dived into the crowd and started a riot.

Well, it’s a new century, and now everybody has a smartphone, which means everybody has a camera.

So … smile, Axl! We’re glad to see you again, more or less.

All the best,

Dan

Daniel Durchholz is a freelance music writer in St. Louis.
Source: http://www.stltoday.com/entertainment/music/a-letter-to-axl-rose-from-a-survivor-of-the/article_4a920128-0a02-5861-b93c-f1e883bf2337.html
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Re: 1991.07.02 - Riverport Amphitheatre, St. Loius, USA

Post by Soulmonster on Fri Jul 21, 2017 5:04 am

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Re: 1991.07.02 - Riverport Amphitheatre, St. Loius, USA

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